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Old 22-06-2013, 13:55   #76
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Re: Checklist For Voluntary Crew

Great posts, and nice chance to play a bit, too! Back to the point, what can a captain do to insure the best possible experience for his crew, I am speaking prior to departure?
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Old 22-06-2013, 16:01   #77
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Re: Checklist For Voluntary Crew

Hi! Prior to boarding... I would want my crew to know how to plot a course on a chart with an alternate plan, just in case; be familiar with the chart's legend. A knowledge of boat's terminology. A knowledge of a few knots tying and their usage. An understanding of rules of the road for sailors. An understanding of wind direction and sails. Understanding/interpretation of weather forecast. Basic VHF radio knowledge. First Aid/CPR knowledge would be a plus.
While underway...the crew will learn hands-on navigation, sails trim, anchoring and docking, night watches, basic boat maintenance, man-overboard procedure, emergency procedures, radio usage/navigational aids/positions reporting, troubleshooting various issues if warranted, isolating an electrical issue, basic repairs while underway, boat's limitations, a recovery from a sandbar if it occurs, sailing in inclement weather, dinghy/outboard handling/towing, scouting for supplies and provisions, usage of PFD and foul gear/safety harness, water/fuel/power consumption and replenishment, to just name a few.
In a given fifteen-day cruise, there will be plenty of time for water sports activities and dinners ashore.

Mauritz
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Old 22-06-2013, 16:43   #78
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"While underway...the crew will learn hands-on navigation, sails trim, anchoring and docking, night watches, basic boat maintenance, man-overboard procedure, emergency procedures, radio usage/navigational aids/positions reporting, troubleshooting various issues if warranted, isolating an electrical issue, basic repairs while underway, boat's limitations, a recovery from a sandbar if it occurs, sailing in inclement weather, dinghy/outboard handling/towing, scouting for supplies and provisions, usage of PFD and foul gear/safety harness, water/fuel/power consumption and replenishment, to just name a few."

Must get downright boring, if the crew already know this.

Personally I just sail the boat.

Dave
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Old 22-06-2013, 18:17   #79
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Re: Checklist For Voluntary Crew

Quote:
Originally Posted by Teknav View Post
Hi! Prior to boarding... I would want my crew to know how to plot a course on a chart with an alternate plan, just in case; be familiar with the chart's legend. A knowledge of boat's terminology. A knowledge of a few knots tying and their usage. An understanding of rules of the road for sailors. An understanding of wind direction and sails. Understanding/interpretation of weather forecast. Basic VHF radio knowledge. First Aid/CPR knowledge would be a plus.
While underway...the crew will learn hands-on navigation, sails trim, anchoring and docking, night watches, basic boat maintenance, man-overboard procedure, emergency procedures, radio usage/navigational aids/positions reporting, troubleshooting various issues if warranted, isolating an electrical issue, basic repairs while underway, boat's limitations, a recovery from a sandbar if it occurs, sailing in inclement weather, dinghy/outboard handling/towing, scouting for supplies and provisions, usage of PFD and foul gear/safety harness, water/fuel/power consumption and replenishment, to just name a few.
In a given fifteen-day cruise, there will be plenty of time for water sports activities and dinners ashore.

Mauritz
If you want to teach me all that on a cruise, sign me up.
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Old 22-06-2013, 18:42   #80
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Re: Checklist For Voluntary Crew

Hi Adventure! This was a reply to an OP who asked about what he should know as a crew member, prior to boarding. I suggested what I consider an adequate amount of knowledge prior to boarding, and what I would teach during a two-week training cruise. I have done this cruise/training three times, a few years ago. This is to be used as a framework for a would be crew member to aim at, during his/her crewing hands-on training. I no longer sail boats. I fly to remote destinations whenever I can; float plane time sharing replaced sailing. I'll gladly answer any of your questions. Sail away!
You're in Australia! I sailed the Great Barrier Reef; SCUBA diving off Heron Island and Lizard Island. I would like to visit western Australia, someday, for more diving; the region south of Perth.

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Old 22-06-2013, 19:23   #81
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Re: Checklist For Voluntary Crew

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Originally Posted by Teknav View Post
Hi Adventure! This was a reply to an OP who asked about what he should know as a crew member, prior to boarding. I suggested what I consider an adequate amount of knowledge prior to boarding, and what I would teach during a two-week training cruise. I have done this cruise/training three times, a few years ago. This is to be used as a framework for a would be crew member to aim at, during his/her crewing hands-on training. I no longer sail boats. I fly to remote destinations whenever I can; float plane time sharing replaced sailing. I'll gladly answer any of your questions. Sail away!
You're in Australia! I sailed the Great Barrier Reef; SCUBA diving off Heron Island and Lizard Island. I would like to visit western Australia, someday, for more diving; the region south of Perth.

Mauritz
If someone has a problem, don't make it yours!
Hi Teknav
I live in Perth and previously in Queensland and scuba dived from Cairns and Lizard Island. A mate of mine from Vancouver camped on the island for four years in the 1970's. Since then I too went into aviation. About 3 years ago imported a Varieze from Wyoming but have sold it. Looking for a cheap single seater-Hummelbird that I can fit into or a Sadler Vampire. Went to Oshkosh show last year. Time shareing a float plane is not something I've heard of. Like you are in a syndicate?

Right now planning a bit of coastal sailing up the West Australia coast in a small salboat when I get it. Next time you are whizzing by, give me a tingle.
Cheers
Norm
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Old 22-06-2013, 19:55   #82
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Re: Checklist For Voluntary Crew

Hi Norm! A syndicate has usually a negative connotation, in the US. I am a retired engineer with friends/former colleagues the world over. In the 70's, as a novice SEL pilot, I used to buy 10-15 hour block time on Piper Archer/C-172. Fast forward a few decades later...a few former colleagues have access to corporate aircraft, which can be used privately under some agreements; hence the "time-share" operating and maintenance cost. None of us can afford to own a $10 M USD float plane.
Going back to SCUBA diving in South-Western Australia. I dove the Mediterranean Sea, the Red Sea, the Caribbean, and South Pacific (Great Barrier Reef and French Polynesia) but never the Indian Ocean. Finding a clean fuel source in remote islands could be difficult, considering the flying range of the DHC; around 400 miles. A lot of logistics to work on. Will certainly keep in touch! Take care!

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Old 22-06-2013, 20:26   #83
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Re: Checklist For Voluntary Crew

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Originally Posted by Teknav View Post
Hi Norm! A syndicate has usually a negative connotation, in the US. I am a retired engineer with friends/former colleagues the world over. In the 70's, as a novice SEL pilot, I used to buy 10-15 hour block time on Piper Archer/C-172. Fast forward a few decades later...a few former colleagues have access to corporate aircraft, which can be used privately under some agreements; hence the "time-share" operating and maintenance cost. None of us can afford to own a $10 M USD float plane.
Going back to SCUBA diving in South-Western Australia. I dove the Mediterranean Sea, the Red Sea, the Caribbean, and South Pacific (Great Barrier Reef and French Polynesia) but never the Indian Ocean. Finding a clean fuel source in remote islands could be difficult, considering the flying range of the DHC; around 400 miles. A lot of logistics to work on. Will certainly keep in touch! Take care!

Mauritz
I don't have personal diving experience here but Ningaloo reef and some islands near Exmouth, all north of Perth, come up as the place to go for diving. That area is renound for whale sharks if you like to do things big.
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Old 22-06-2013, 20:43   #84
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Re: Checklist For Voluntary Crew

Having done many deliveries with inexperienced crew, I don't mind turning them on to how I do things as long as they are willing and able to learn. One of the worst passages I had was with a guy who came very highly recommended by a couple of skippers he had sailed with previously. Unfortunately, even after some questioning, it wasn't until we were about 3 days from any port that it became apparent that he was a manic-depressive who had forgotten or decided not to take his meds. Thank goodness my son was the third crew member and we ended up tying this guy up in his bunk (totally uncontrollable, throwing crap around the cabin and screaming) and returned to our port of departure. Called an ambulance, managed the immigration issues and hired another crew member to make the trip from PV back to LA.
I always interrogated prospective crew members about drug use and possession of drugs over dinner after a few cocktails and never got stung in over 30 years of deliveries. I'm sure I was scammed on occasion but we never got apprehended, even after a few dog searches by ICE on arrival in the US.
You do build up a cadre of crew who want to sail with you so it simplifys the recruitment issue over the years but as a skipper you need to be fair, respectful, firm, confident, knowledgeable, patient and a good teacher. Other than that, you can be a complete dick! Phil
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Old 22-06-2013, 20:46   #85
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Re: Checklist For Voluntary Crew

Hi Norm! While diving Rangiroa - French Polynesia, I saw hammerheads, lemon, black tip, white tip and tiger sharks; a shark heaven. I don't mind diving in shark areas. Rottnest island, off Western Australia coast looks like a decent place to fly to, sail to remote islands and dive. The waters surrounding Rottnest are very inviting; just browsed a dozen shots. Flying from Texas to WA will take about 3-4 days, commercially; a lot of logistics to consider. Probably a locally charterered bare boat would be a good option, for the diving. I'll keep you posted!

Mauritz
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Old 22-06-2013, 21:03   #86
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Re: Checklist For Voluntary Crew

Hi Phil! In my situation, I also have a Pharmacy license. My license can be suspended and/or revoked if illegal drugs are found on my boat/plane. I may sound paranoid on insisting that my crew must carry a TWIC ID card and a current passport, but the stakes are very high for me. The process of securing a TWIC, eliminates a lot of would-be crew with issues; still, not all are squeaky clean even with a TWIC. Under US laws, it is illegal to inject someone with a drug, if you are not a Medical Doctor. Under maritime laws, if the captain deems that the crew and the boat are in danger because of the erratic behavior of a crew member, appropriate measures can be taken...

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Old 22-06-2013, 21:24   #87
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Re: Checklist For Voluntary Crew

Very good point, Teknav... the TWIC card came into existence about the time I retired but the issue of drugs being brought aboard have been with us for years. Same goes for firearms south or north of the US borders.
IMO you are not paranoid at all... just using good judgement!
When I was a ski patroller back in the 70's during the winters in Canada, as long as we had a phsician on the patrol on the mountain we were able to inject demerol for pain management even though the doc wasn't present as long as we had been trained to do so. Better than having to transport some poor bastard with a compound fracture after we had splinted and tried to align his broken leg!
I always carried some in my personal first aid kit offshore, along with a supply of syringes for diabetics, drugs to deal with anafalactic shock and severe pain. While I never had to administer anything intramuscularly when I was offshore, I wouldn't hesitate to do it if someone required it, even though I'm not permitted to under US law. Within the 3 mile limit, probably close enough to call USCG or get to port for medical help.
I agree that taking anyone aboard without a passport into or from a foreign country is fraught with problems for the skipper. Once you are on the 'list', you attract a lot of unwanted scrutiny. With all the cross info exchanged between country's today, your ability to earn a living out there is seriously curtailed. Glad I'm out of the business! Cheers, Phil
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Old 22-06-2013, 21:28   #88
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Re: Checklist For Voluntary Crew

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Originally Posted by Teknav View Post
Hi Norm! While diving Rangiroa - French Polynesia, I saw hammerheads, lemon, black tip, white tip and tiger sharks; a shark heaven. I don't mind diving in shark areas. Rottnest island, off Western Australia coast looks like a decent place to fly to, sail to remote islands and dive. The waters surrounding Rottnest are very inviting; just browsed a dozen shots. Flying from Texas to WA will take about 3-4 days, commercially; a lot of logistics to consider. Probably a locally charterered bare boat would be a good option, for the diving. I'll keep you posted!

Mauritz
Sent you a message.
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Old 22-06-2013, 22:45   #89
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Re: Checklist For Voluntary Crew

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Under US laws, it is illegal to inject someone with a drug, if you are not a Medical Doctor.
That's not even close to true.
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Old 22-06-2013, 22:48   #90
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Re: Checklist For Voluntary Crew

What is the TWIC alternative for non-US citizens? A current passport seems quite logical.

While I am a person who likes to let people be themselves and I try not to judge them, everyone gets judged a single "pass/fail"upon returning to the US, or to most countries. If my fellow crewman who I was trying not to judge happens to bring in a substance or a tool (gun) undeclared, they are not going to just judge the crew. They are going to judge the captain with eyes toward seizing the boat. It seems only reasonable to expect all of your things to be subject to search by captain or crew before the guy with a badge and a gun searches. Unfortunately, some people don't appreciate the loss of their civil liberty while on your $100,000 boat. What are good ways to do this nicely?
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