Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 03-01-2008, 11:25   #1
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2006
Boat: NewPort 33, Lucille
Posts: 19
weather patterns baja/hawaii?

I'm trying to get a feel for the typical wind patterns form a trip from the NW to Baja and onto to Hawaii. Has anyone come across any charts online with an overview of the typical wind patterns that form up in the Eastern Pacific? I've found some good resources for forecast maps that cover this area, but the forecast is very short range and doesn't let me know if these are "normal" wind conditions, or just what's happening that day. Specifically, I'm trying to visualize where the Pacific High is during typically seasons.

Thanks!

-Nate
__________________

__________________
eldiente is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2008, 11:38   #2
Moderator Emeritus
 
GordMay's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 31,573
Images: 240
A pilot chart, or atlas, amongst other things, provides a month-by-month, grid-by-grid graphical representation of wind speed and direction based on historical data. The idea being to enable passage planning using the probability of favourable wind speed and direction for different possible routes at different times of the year. It must be emphasized that these charts are compiled on historical data and the winds actually experienced on a particular route may be quite different to that shown on the charts. Having said that, they are most useful in planning a route to give one the best chance of getting favourable conditions, for example, taking advantage of seasonal winds such as the Trades, and many other very predicable winds throughout the world.

Goto
NGA Digital Navigation Publications
Atlas of Pilot Charts
:
Maritime Safety Information

Publications 107 (North) and 108 (South) Pacific Ocean


pollux.nss.nima.mil/pubs/pubs_j_apc_list.html
__________________

__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2008, 12:07   #3
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2006
Boat: NewPort 33, Lucille
Posts: 19
That's good info. Anyone used any of the info from QuikSCAT? Looks like a great resources but I haven't had any luck finding historical data in a graphical form.


Quote:
Originally Posted by GordMay View Post
A pilot chart, or atlas, amongst other things, provides a month-by-month, grid-by-grid graphical representation of wind speed and direction based on historical data. The idea being to enable passage planning using the probability of favourable wind speed and direction for different possible routes at different times of the year. It must be emphasized that these charts are compiled on historical data and the winds actually experienced on a particular route may be quite different to that shown on the charts. Having said that, they are most useful in planning a route to give one the best chance of getting favourable conditions, for example, taking advantage of seasonal winds such as the Trades, and many other very predicable winds throughout the world.

Goto
NGA Digital Navigation Publications
Atlas of Pilot Charts
:
Maritime Safety Information

Publications 107 (North) and 108 (South) Pacific Ocean


pollux.nss.nima.mil/pubs/pubs_j_apc_list.html
__________________
eldiente is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2008, 15:38   #4
Registered User

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Hawaii
Boat: Cross 38 Trimaran
Posts: 109
weather patterns

Hi,
Get a copy of Jimmy Cornell's World Cruising routes. And a copy of Ocean Passages for the World. Ocean Passages is primarily for Commercial Use but has all the old sailing routes and noted conditions used by sailing vessels.
You can also send a query off to Noonsite Cornell"s web site and they will promptly reply. I recently asked them about a transit So Cal to Hawaii this time of year and they were very helpful. Replys can be short and succinct. I would recommend Noonsite as a source of Info and also SV Watermelon's website they are also very helpful and spent quite a few years in the Pacific.
Rich
__________________
Red Horse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2008, 16:44   #5
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Honolulu, HI
Boat: Hans Christian 33 NAKIA
Posts: 54
Send a message via Yahoo to svnakia Send a message via Skype™ to svnakia
Another option is to get visual passage planner, it's pricy but really does do the trick with regard to optimizing an offshore voyage. Also, often times a friend has a copy that you can borrow to check out your route.
__________________
svnakia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2008, 17:34   #6
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Southern California
Boat: Was - Passport 45 Ketch
Posts: 837
You can't go too far wrong sailing down the West Coast in the summer. You'll get NW winds about 90% of the time.

Most people try to get to Mexico by November (after hurricane season), spend some time cruising Mexico then head to Hawaii the following June (beginning of the next hurricane season).

If you're not interested in Mexico, leave for Hawaii from San Fransisco in June/July. It'll be a broad reach the entire way (most years).

From now until May, I would stay put. This is not a good year on the West Coast (as you well know).

General rule of thumb for ocean passages:

Sail the tropics in the winter and above 38* in the summer only.

Don't go against the flow.
__________________
Kanani is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2008, 16:43   #7
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Nevada City. CA
Boat: Sceptre 41
Posts: 3,745
Images: 9
Sounds like a good trip. I agree with Kanani. Mexico in Nov then head for Hawaii before the hurricane season.
__________________
Fair Winds,

Charlie

Between us there was, as I have already said somewhere, the bond of the sea. Besides holding our hearts together through long periods of separation, it had the effect of making us tolerant of each other's yarns -- and even convictions. Heart of Darkness
Joseph Conrad
Charlie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2008, 17:40   #8
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2006
Boat: NewPort 33, Lucille
Posts: 19
Are the winds fairly consistent leaving from Mexico in the Spring heading for Hawaii? I know a lot places on the West cost still experience a lot of variable winds during the Spring, but than again this is coming from my experience with NW weather patterns where the summer is slow to come.


On the return trip, what are good windows to go from Hawaii back to the NW? Better to wait until later in the summer or wait until early fall to head back to the NW?

Thanks for the info, very helpful.
-Nate

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charlie View Post
Sounds like a good trip. I agree with Kanani. Mexico in Nov then head for Hawaii before the hurricane season.
__________________
eldiente is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2008, 17:50   #9
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Southern California
Boat: Was - Passport 45 Ketch
Posts: 837
Quote:
Originally Posted by eldiente View Post
Are the winds fairly consistent leaving from Mexico in the Spring heading for Hawaii? I know a lot places on the West cost still experience a lot of variable winds during the Spring, but than again this is coming from my experience with NW weather patterns where the summer is slow to come.


On the return trip, what are good windows to go from Hawaii back to the NW? Better to wait until later in the summer or wait until early fall to head back to the NW?

Thanks for the info, very helpful.
-Nate
The N. Pacific weather really doesn't stabilize until June. That's when the N Pac High stabilizes NE of Hawaii. Spring-time can bring anything from dead calms to severe cold fronts. If you leave before June, you will want to head to 20N then due west. Take lots of fuel, you may be doing a lot of motoring (to limit your exposure) but when you get the clod fronts, they won't be severe at that latitude.

You want to be out of Mexico before about the 10th of June. The farther south, close to the coast, the more serious the hurricane threat at that time. In July, the hurricanes wander a little farther off shore but stay below 20N. August, all bets are off. It's a very dangerous passage at that time.

The return to the NW is best done in Aug. Hurricanes don't usually get as far as Hawaii until Sept/Oct and you get plenty of warning.. Leave from Kauai. The old saying is, "Head north until the butter freezes then turn right".
__________________

__________________
Kanani is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
baja

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Weather Basics ~ Reading Weather Charts GordMay General Sailing Forum 6 28-04-2011 16:35
Best Watch Patterns for 2 People? ssullivan General Sailing Forum 12 28-09-2007 08:33
Baja Cruiser's Book Da BigBamboo The Library 1 29-10-2006 01:57
BAJA HA HA? windthief Cruising News & Events 1 27-09-2006 19:21
“Ohm’s Law & You” ~and~ “Weather Basics - Reading Weather Maps” GordMay The Library 0 16-12-2005 06:54



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 16:27.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.