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Old 06-03-2009, 21:58   #1
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Mooring Buoy Placement in Washington State

I have used the local knowledge a lot on this forum and I appreciate it. One more question (there always seems to be one more) : How difficult is it to place a buoy off of land that you own along the sounds in the Puget Sound area? I was thinking of picking up some property either around Ocean Shores (bayside) or Hood Canal (east of the hook) to moor my sailboat. That way I can buy something that will increase in value and my sailboat has a home. If fact, I might even place two buoys and have some neighbours. What do you guys think?
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Old 07-03-2009, 05:08   #2
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It's a great idea and very simple.

Of course anchors are part of life, but if you're going to be onshore for extended periods of time, I sleep at night knowing I am on a ball that is attached to the seafloor.

Good luck!
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Old 07-03-2009, 08:52   #3
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You will need to check with local authorities--most likely the Town or County off which you intend to place your mooring will have some kind of regulation. The land under the water (out to the 3 mile limit) belongs to the state, but most states delegate the regulation of moorings in immediate waters to the local governments. I am not familiar with the specifics of WA state law, but most states are similar. The local regulations vary, some will allow you to drop them with no notification, while others--especially where there is limited space--require the approval of a local harbor master. You do not "own" the land on which your mooring is placed, you are responsible for the equipement you deploy.

The Coast Guard requires that mooring buoys be white with a blue horizontal stripe to differentiate them from navigation buoys. There are some ABYC specifications for moorings relative to the size of the boat. I would recommend that you talk with some locals about the appropriate equipment. In my former life as a harbor master, we lost a number of boats each year to poorly constructed or maintained mooring equipment.
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Old 07-03-2009, 13:14   #4
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Every City/County has it's own regulations. You'll have to look up the area your in but here are some examples .................._/)

http://www.ci.bainbridge-isl.wa.us/d...quirements.pdf

Find It! Washington
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Old 08-03-2009, 08:22   #5
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Hood Canal...

You may have to skip Hood Canal though... its use by the Navy means there are rather a few more hoops to leap through.

You can build an anchor-based mooring fairly easily, especially if you can skin dive in cold water. Three inexpensive fluke-type anchors, each with about 8-16' of chain attached to a large and heavy ring. Attached to this is a length of very heavy chain several feet longer than the greatest tidal range, then some light chain to the mooring buoy. The anchors are hand-set as far away from each other as possible, at the points of an equilateral triangle.

The resulting mooring is safe and cheap, so long as the anchors are actually set. But most likely if the region has specific rules as to what may be put down you will need to use a professional service to set something. If you're thinking of buying land, some neighbourhoods include community docks, or a cheap float/temporary dock may be an option (remember a professional mooring needs to be removed and inspected annually - you get a property insurance break if you do.)
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Old 08-03-2009, 09:34   #6
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Ten years back there was a fellow who would sink a mooring for $400. Now who knows what the price is now but the mooring itself was interesting, and he garanteed it not to fail or drag. Basically a concrete pyramid, 3 foot at the base, with a 3 inch PVC tube running from the point to the base of the pyramind. The idea is that the 3 inch pipe allowed the point of the pyramid to workitself into the sea bed. Not too sure how it would work on a rocky bed, but moorings placed on rocky bottoms in 1990 are still there.
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Old 12-03-2009, 10:51   #7
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Well, spent a few days looking around the sound- Any property along the coast is too expensive, except if it is "problem property" Looks like I will just anchor out and hope for the best...
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Old 01-01-2011, 09:02   #8
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Pyramid moorage anchor

Do you know how he placed it? It sounds like a good idea but how did he get it to stand up on the point so that it could work itself into the sea bed over time?



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Ten years back there was a fellow who would sink a mooring for $400. Now who knows what the price is now but the mooring itself was interesting, and he garanteed it not to fail or drag. Basically a concrete pyramid, 3 foot at the base, with a 3 inch PVC tube running from the point to the base of the pyramind. The idea is that the 3 inch pipe allowed the point of the pyramid to workitself into the sea bed. Not too sure how it would work on a rocky bed, but moorings placed on rocky bottoms in 1990 are still there.
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