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Old 15-10-2013, 02:04   #31
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Re: Expats in the Philippines

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Originally Posted by Emmalina View Post
Once saw a 80+ year old getting wheeled into a gogo bar by his 20yr old wife pushed up to the dancers and dribbling Now give me the choice of that or in an old people's home playing dominoes and guess which one I would choose ......... But I have never seen so many 60 year old teenagers as Bangkok
Hey, dominoes can be pretty stimulating but I'm not so sure about the dribbling?
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Old 15-10-2013, 04:29   #32
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Re: Expats in the Philippines

"what does a 25-30 year old want with a 70 year old but money and what happens when that starts running out?" ==> Actually when one is an older expat with a much younger pinay, one tends to meet many other such couples. Perhaps Thai women are different, but by and large, these couples that i have met seem to genuinely care for each other. I also see how many other filipinas are treated by their husbands - the culture here allows men to have mistresses, and it is often taken advantage of by the local men. The social safety net is nearly nonexistent here and it is common to find young women with a child having been abandoned by the father of that child - actually i am surprised when the father is still around and in a monogamous relationship with his wife. Mature western males tend to be less abusive and more caring partners than many locals - and yes, we have a stable income that gives a local woman much more than she would likely get from a local male. What 'wild oats' we have can usually be absorbed by a younger partner without undue difficulty. There are often four stages to these partnerships - 1) sexy girlfriend; 2) loving wife; 3) loyal caregiver; and 4) wealthy (by third world standards) widow.

Yes, there can be communication difficulties in these relationships. First, few men actually understand women, even when they are from the same culture. This is compounded by the age difference, and by the cultural differences, and by language differences. But knowing there are likely to be communication glitches, one can try to be prepared and patient - easier because the mature men are often more patient with their younger partners.
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Old 15-10-2013, 08:10   #33
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Re: Expats in the Philippines

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Originally Posted by Emmalina View Post
Once saw a 80+ year old getting wheeled into a gogo bar by his 20yr old wife pushed up to the dancers and dribbling Now give me the choice of that or in an old people's home playing dominoes and guess which one I would choose ......... But I have never seen so many 60 year old teenagers as Bangkok
Speaking for myself...neither. At some point I had to grow up. I enjoy being around like minded people as myself...active. We all age...no one gets out alive. The thought of adventure with an equal aged female partner appeals to me more than either of those other options.
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Old 16-10-2013, 13:30   #34
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Re: Expats in the Philippines

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Originally Posted by Cap Erict3 View Post
Manila can be a dangerous place. Plenty of pickpockets and scam artists also. I spent most of my time in Cebu.
I have only been to Manila and it is the only Asian city I have walked around in and felt unsafe at night. I have lived in the region for many years and must have stayed in hundreds of hotels and guesthouses.

The taxi scammed me and dumped me at the second worst hotel I have ever stayed at. (The worst was in Kolkata). Looking for somewhere to eat involved running a gauntlet of hostile and suspicious stares. Every second doorway was looking for a GRO (which I later discovered stood for guest relation officer).

I slept in my room, on top of the bed fully clothed, ready to run at a seconds notice.. I did not even open my bags to get my toothbrush. Three times during the night I was woken up by a GRO knocking on the door. Six a.m. the next day I was out of that hotel before even having my morning pee. The experience cost me $70.

After finding the old city and proper hotel district I discovered daytime Manila a much nicer place, even though a horse drawn tourist ride tried to scam me again.

One of the most interesting streets I stumbled upon was a seaman's labour market. All along the footpath there were desks or signs from shipping companies seeking sailors or ships officers. Hundreds of applicants walked up and down making enquires about jobs.

The Philippines must supply a huge number of able seamen to the world's shipping fleets.

I did meet some nice locals in the park (during the day) and we played chess and talked for hours. I would like to go back but will steer clear of Manila.
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Old 16-10-2013, 22:41   #35
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Re: Expats in the Philippines

Yes, many think that Manila sucks. Having a local contact is important - I have been there thrice; my first trip was with a guide whose pinay wife handled the details - and on the other two visits I was with my own pinay (Filipina) who had a brother living/working in the city. Everyone that I know attempts to fly into Cebu (the Mactan International Airport) although all airports/terminals (port/bus) tend to have the same setup with expensive transport. At airports, we usually try to go to the 'departures' area where taxis are dropping off passengers to depart and are often leaving empty rather waiting in the long line for a fare - if you are quick you can often snag a taxi which will use the meter per normal instead of a negotiated/fixed fee. if there is a line, the drivers in the front of the line have been sitting there for a while and will charge big because they know they are next. Ask the fee about halfway back and the price will likely come down a bit - the further back you go the lower the likely price - and you have time to discuss destinations and meter use. If you are in a more populated area and can see a busy street not to far away, and you don't have a mountain of luggage - a short walk will put you where rates are normal. Another trick is to go to a major mall if there is one close buy - these are like miniature transport hubs and you can get much cheaper local transport in you know where you are going and don't have massive luggage which smaller vehicles are too crowded to handle although if you don't mind it being on the roof your options do expand a bit (I took a hooka on a jeepney and the conductor easily put both items on the roof - these little guys are a lot stronger than they look).

Another option is to monitor/lurk on a couple of Yahoo groups devoted to expats living in the PI; these subjects - especially where to stay and how to get there - are often discussed.

My pinay always researches a pension house prior to arrival - but anyone with a web site is likely to be a bit upscale. We use this as a backup and ask a local driver for recommendations after outlining our needs. She checks out the rooms and prices while I stay with the luggage in the vehicle - if she is happy with the room and location, we stay; otherwise we have the driver try again. Yes, they get a kickback for bringing you - but they are often knowledgeable and have usually worked out well. If you let your transport go too early, you are stuck. Always test to see if stuff works when inspecting the room - turn on the aircon to see if it quietly blows cold air, flush the commode to insure it works, turn on the shower to test the flow and temperature, turn on the TV and verify your remote works. These rooms are often large and inexpensive - and you can negotiate: 10% discount for a 'long' stay, sometimes only a week; can you get a small refrigerator included?; is there a complementary breakfast? Can you get complementary hot/cold drinking water (in a country where few drink the tap water, this can be really handy)? Also, your pinay will keep the strays away; I have never been bothered by a GRO or LOTN (Lady of the Night).
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Old 17-10-2013, 00:04   #36
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Re: Expats in the Philippines

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Originally Posted by Bruce626 View Post
Yes, many think that Manila sucks. Having a local contact is important - I have been there thrice; my first trip was with a guide whose pinay wife handled the details - and on the other two visits I was with my own pinay (Filipina) who had a brother living/working in the city. Everyone that I know attempts to fly into Cebu (the Mactan International Airport) although all airports/terminals (port/bus) tend to have the same setup with expensive transport. At airports, we usually try to go to the 'departures' area where taxis are dropping off passengers to depart and are often leaving empty rather waiting in the long line for a fare - if you are quick you can often snag a taxi which will use the meter per normal instead of a negotiated/fixed fee. if there is a line, the drivers in the front of the line have been sitting there for a while and will charge big because they know they are next. Ask the fee about halfway back and the price will likely come down a bit - the further back you go the lower the likely price - and you have time to discuss destinations and meter use. If you are in a more populated area and can see a busy street not to far away, and you don't have a mountain of luggage - a short walk will put you where rates are normal. Another trick is to go to a major mall if there is one close buy - these are like miniature transport hubs and you can get much cheaper local transport in you know where you are going and don't have massive luggage which smaller vehicles are too crowded to handle although if you don't mind it being on the roof your options do expand a bit (I took a hooka on a jeepney and the conductor easily put both items on the roof - these little guys are a lot stronger than they look).

Another option is to monitor/lurk on a couple of Yahoo groups devoted to expats living in the PI; these subjects - especially where to stay and how to get there - are often discussed.

My pinay always researches a pension house prior to arrival - but anyone with a web site is likely to be a bit upscale. We use this as a backup and ask a local driver for recommendations after outlining our needs. She checks out the rooms and prices while I stay with the luggage in the vehicle - if she is happy with the room and location, we stay; otherwise we have the driver try again. Yes, they get a kickback for bringing you - but they are often knowledgeable and have usually worked out well. If you let your transport go too early, you are stuck. Always test to see if stuff works when inspecting the room - turn on the aircon to see if it quietly blows cold air, flush the commode to insure it works, turn on the shower to test the flow and temperature, turn on the TV and verify your remote works. These rooms are often large and inexpensive - and you can negotiate: 10% discount for a 'long' stay, sometimes only a week; can you get a small refrigerator included?; is there a complementary breakfast? Can you get complementary hot/cold drinking water (in a country where few drink the tap water, this can be really handy)? Also, your pinay will keep the strays away; I have never been bothered by a GRO or LOTN (Lady of the Night).

Quote:
I have only been to Manila and it is the only Asian city I have walked around in and felt unsafe at night. I have lived in the region for many years and must have stayed in hundreds of hotels and guesthouses.

The taxi scammed me and dumped me at the second worst hotel I have ever stayed at. (The worst was in Kolkata). Looking for somewhere to eat involved running a gauntlet of hostile and suspicious stares. Every second doorway was looking for a GRO (which I later discovered stood for guest relation officer).

I slept in my room, on top of the bed fully clothed, ready to run at a seconds notice.. I did not even open my bags to get my toothbrush. Three times during the night I was woken up by a GRO knocking on the door. Six a.m. the next day I was out of that hotel before even having my morning pee. The experience cost me $70.

After finding the old city and proper hotel district I discovered daytime Manila a much nicer place, even though a horse drawn tourist ride tried to scam me again.

One of the most interesting streets I stumbled upon was a seaman's labour market. All along the footpath there were desks or signs from shipping companies seeking sailors or ships officers. Hundreds of applicants walked up and down making enquires about jobs.

The Philippines must supply a huge number of able seamen to the world's shipping fleets.

I did meet some nice locals in the park (during the day) and we played chess and talked for hours. I would like to go back but will steer clear of Manila.
If I hadn't been there so many times this would scare me!

There are good areas and bad just like any large city. One needs to learn where they are and avoid them. Also learning a bit of the language is also great help.

I found a fairly decent hotel for the price and I stick with it whenever I need to be in Manila. My wife's family would allow us to stay with but I like my privacy and to choose my own food. They eat too much/often to suit me.

Times/attitudes are changing in PI fairly fast. The transportation is being changed and updated. If you have a problem with a taxi al you have to do is get their # and turn them in. They have an organization now that monitors their service and can get in trouble if reported. >>> http://www.philippinestaxiservice.co...hilippines.jpg
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Old 17-10-2013, 07:35   #37
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Re: Expats in the Philippines

Hope everyone & theirs, in the central Philippines, are ok.
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/17/wo...ises.html?_r=0
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Old 22-10-2013, 05:37   #38
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Re: Expats in the Philippines

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Hope everyone & theirs, in the central Philippines, are ok.
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/17/wo...ises.html?_r=0
Thank you for your concern. I am currently on Cebu, the next island over from Bohol where the earthquake did the most damage. I have been through several similar sized earthquakes in California, but this one has many more aftershocks that can be felt - I think I have felt ten or so to date. I have wondered if something else is going on under the island of Bohol - magma intrusion perhaps as we are on the Pacific ring of fire here. The fault that caused the earthquake was unknown before it broke - the initial reporting attributed it to a nearby known fault. I have been on the island of Bohol and toured some of its attractions in the past - I have even been in a couple of the old big stone Spanish churches that took so much damage.
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Old 23-10-2013, 00:24   #39
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Re: Expats in the Philippines

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It is even cheaper if you just pay by the hour!

Re the relatives, here in Thailand it's common knowledge that when you marry a Thai girl you marry the extended family so make sure you know who else (brothers and sisters) are around to also contribute; otherwise, it may be just you.
I heard its worse in the Philippines, when you marry a Pinay, you marry the entire nation! Jokes aside there are a lot of differences between the Phils and Thailand.

It is a vortex for solo sailors, they make good boat girls are a lot of them are used to the sea, it is a archipelago after all. Stay away from Manilia and cruise the islands and visit some of the smaller cities.
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Old 23-01-2014, 20:51   #40
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Re: Expats in the Philippines

Beware of the yacht club in cebu city, they are very unfriendly extortionists.

They tried to charge me 200 PHP just to land a kayak, and wanted to charge me for the day before when I didn't even land there! This is twice my cost of living (100 PHP per day) for something that costs them nothing, and goes against my right of public access. I have never had this experience in any other place.

It is better instead to land at the restaurant next door, they are normal and like most people do not try to charge something for nothing.

Cebu is best avoided (I need a new passport so I'm here) it is a disgusting dirty dangerous (to cross the road) place where there are many many plastic pieces of trash in the harbor, and I can always see diesel around my boat. They also are banging metal on metal and grinding metal 24 hours a day. It smells like feces at night, and there are mosquitoes. The food is very unhealthy and fruit is expensive.

Philippines is the land of smiles no more, try Vanuatu.
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