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Old 03-01-2011, 17:43   #16
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What is the 35' bluewater-type boat? Panamanian Surveyors?

Just curious....

Keep in mind that hurricane season begins May 15. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2011_Pa...rricane_season
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Old 03-01-2011, 18:29   #17
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It's a Baba.
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Old 03-01-2011, 19:48   #18
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Since no one else has asked, why on earth go to Panama to buy a boat? Unless this is the deal of the century on the cleanest, best prepared boat on the market any possible savings you could ever, possibly realize will be eaten up and a lot more in flying down for the purchase and trying to get the boat back to the states.

As has been pointed out a couple of times, the trip north from Panama to PNW is a major trip. Even the trip north from LA to PNW is a major trip and plenty of good sailors with good boats have had their butts kicked trying to do it.

Why not try to find something a little closer to home? Even Hawaii is a better option than Panama.
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Old 03-01-2011, 21:01   #19
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Sounds like quite a challenge is at hand for you. Best not to think you will execute your plan perfectly. Adapt and survive as they say. The best plans account for this, and ego, schedules, etc. take a back seat. I just bought my first keel boat last June but this I quickly learned to be true.

Found the right boat for me in St. Pete, FL. Thought I'd go down and hang out for one, maybe two months and sail it north to the Mobile, AL area. I thought since I could single hand my Hobie18 at 52 years with no problem I was up to the challenge.

Only took a short time to realize my plan was naive. I've been driving down once a month since June for a week or more stay on the boat. Each time I add another task to the schedule to learn. Marina maneuvering, anchoring out, reefing, calling bridges, etc. I knew how to sail (the Hobie) but all these things were new to me. Learning the best way for me to navigate safely has occupied many hours of my time. (three GPS units, two laptops, two VHFs, old monochrome plotter at the helm, booklet charts to markup). Last time the new tasks were setting an offshore route out 12 miles in a diamond pattern back to the pass (to see if I could actually go where I wanted to) and arriving back at the fair water mark after dark (exhilarating!).

Next is practice heaving to and making the first leg of the goal to travel north and anchor overnight to return to the starting point the next day. I think in late Feb. or Mar. I may be ready to head north for real.

But I'm not holding myself to that. I'm having too much fun to kill myself doing it.
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Old 03-01-2011, 21:03   #20
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It's a Baba.
Nice! Maybe add an EPIRB and liferaft (not that you would ever need them), and she looks pretty much ready to go. Maybe an AIS also. There is lots of traffic (big ships) out there near Panama.

Definitely worth having a surveyor check her out. Good luck with the purchase.
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Old 03-01-2011, 21:43   #21
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Since no one else has asked, why on earth go to Panama to buy a boat? Unless this is the deal of the century on the cleanest, best prepared boat on the market any possible savings you could ever, possibly realize will be eaten up and a lot more in flying down for the purchase and trying to get the boat back to the states.

As has been pointed out a couple of times, the trip north from Panama to PNW is a major trip. Even the trip north from LA to PNW is a major trip and plenty of good sailors with good boats have had their butts kicked trying to do it.

Why not try to find something a little closer to home? Even Hawaii is a better option than Panama.
Skipmac, you raise a good question. It's a combination of two things: 1) I just love those damn boats! I think they're beautiful and elegant and just kind of right for what I want in a boat. 2) From what I can tell, it's exceptionally well equipped for the price. I'll certainly have a much better idea of it's actual value after the survey. Clearly this is in large part an emotional 'decision' and will not yield entirely to reason!
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Old 03-01-2011, 23:21   #22
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She is pretty. Good luck with your decision. It is going to cost you at least $5k to get that boat to Oregon. Maybe more. By the time you pay canal fees, fuel, food, etc. As long as nothing major breaks. Put that into your spreadsheet. Good luck.
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Old 03-01-2011, 23:42   #23
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considering the canal transit is now 1800 for up to 50 ft(NOT including lines,handlers, fenders, pilot, broker--lol et cetera..)--will take more than 5k to get boat to pnw.... gooodluck..... have fun... will be an ADVENTURE.
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Old 04-01-2011, 00:00   #24
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As someone has already said, if you don't need to be back in the PNW soon, take a season in the Caribbean. The sailing is much easier, but still with enough to help you learn many skills.
Also, for navigation you may want to look at an RYA Correspondence course out of the UK. I have taken both the RYA yachtmaster and all the ASA classes and the navigation you will learn is much better from the RYA and also more international.
Go for it!!

Enjoy,
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Old 04-01-2011, 00:11   #25
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$1800!! Ouch. Apparently I had found an outdated fee schedule.

It's still cheaper than going around, I guess.
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Old 04-01-2011, 02:01   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by four winds View Post
Sounds like quite a challenge is at hand for you. Best not to think you will execute your plan perfectly. Adapt and survive as they say. The best plans account for this, and ego, schedules, etc. take a back seat. I just bought my first keel boat last June but this I quickly learned to be true.

Found the right boat for me in St. Pete, FL. Thought I'd go down and hang out for one, maybe two months and sail it north to the Mobile, AL area. I thought since I could single hand my Hobie18 at 52 years with no problem I was up to the challenge.

Only took a short time to realize my plan was naive. I've been driving down once a month since June for a week or more stay on the boat. Each time I add another task to the schedule to learn. Marina maneuvering, anchoring out, reefing, calling bridges, etc. I knew how to sail (the Hobie) but all these things were new to me. Learning the best way for me to navigate safely has occupied many hours of my time. (three GPS units, two laptops, two VHFs, old monochrome plotter at the helm, booklet charts to markup). Last time the new tasks were setting an offshore route out 12 miles in a diamond pattern back to the pass (to see if I could actually go where I wanted to) and arriving back at the fair water mark after dark (exhilarating!).

Next is practice heaving to and making the first leg of the goal to travel north and anchor overnight to return to the starting point the next day. I think in late Feb. or Mar. I may be ready to head north for real.

But I'm not holding myself to that. I'm having too much fun to kill myself doing it.
Lovely boat Jason and I think you are asking intelligent questions for someone who is committing to a new lifestyle, beginning with a large investment in a far away land.

You are correct, developing specific skills takes experience, but one thing I garnered from all the great sailing books I’ve read, was the positive attitude by the skipper/writers that they could troubleshoot and identify problems in the most adverse conditions, prior to finding a solution. Attitude is the key!

Because of the dynamics of sailing, that study and learning never stops so start now by thinking as a captain/owner of what your actual priorities are before getting lost in a non-sailors self imposed schedule.

I think Four Winds has given you great advice.

I would suggest adapting it to your situation by using the Seller’s time to focus on getting to know the boat and her idiosyncrasies intimately, so that you will have identified “after sale potential problems” that he wishes to disclose, before committing to an uphill slog as a passenger/owner.

In other words…start thinking like a skipper now and leave when you know you can handle it and the crew you choose can help back up your weak areas in maintenance or repairs.

Finally:

Remember this Sailing Mantra, as it relates to simple things like Reefing, all yacht problem solving and trip management:

“If it doesn’t come easy…. You are doing something basically wrong!"

STOP and look cleanly at the situation because you are hung up on some negative force.”

Best of Luck!
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Old 04-01-2011, 02:44   #27
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Sharkbrain,
We used an agent for our Panama transit last year and that's the most expensive way to go. You can do everything without an agent. But our costs, including an agent were:

Below is the basic transit fees for Tenaya and the bank wire info.

Panama Canal tolls: 622.00
Agency fee: 525.00
Cruising permit: 69.00
Consent to clear: 15.00
Clearance: 13.00
Lines: 100.00
Visas: 30.00
Overtime and incidentals: 60.00
Bank wire fee: 25.00
Total: 1,459.00
Tax: 72.95
Grand Total: $1,531.95

That is for a 40' boat. With an agent there is no deposit required by the Canal.

You can read about our transit at Home Page
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Old 04-01-2011, 05:21   #28
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I would also factor in that Seller could change his mind on helping out with Delivery once cash changes hands........
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Old 04-01-2011, 05:47   #29
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PLAN B

Sharkbrain,

This link is a good place to start.
http://www.boatingbasicsonline.com/content/general/toc.php

Everyone here covered all the rest.
The most important part is that the previous owner will be with you to start your trip.
You will learn everything you need from him to get you going and keep you going.

If he backs out you will have to have “PLAN B” in place, which is to have a profession captain ready to go with you.

Mark
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Old 04-01-2011, 16:27   #30
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Talking

Thanks everybody for all of the excellent suggestions and advice. Some of it was a little hard to hear, but far better to have realistically dampened expectations now than a dangerously rude awakening later!
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