Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 08-12-2009, 19:42   #1
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Akron, Ohio
Boat: Bristol 29(1967)
Posts: 599
Your Longest Sail without Motoring

I have had it with my "gas" outboard. It's pretty new, pretty unreliable, pretty loud and idles too fast(even after 3 tune-ups).

SO, I am seriously thinking of going electric.

Of course EVERYONE is trying to talk me out of it because of lack of power and lack of distance capability(on the motor).

NOW . . . unless I missed something, these ARE SAILBOATS, right?

I mean, these boats should generally be sailed . . . not powered.

ANYWAY, with this thought in mind, I wonder how long(time) or far some of the members have sailed without ever turning on their auxillary power?

I know Lin and Larry Pardey sailed without a motor, but they're rather extraordinary.
__________________

__________________
SURV69 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2009, 19:46   #2
Senior Cruiser
 
skipmac's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: 29° 49.16’ N 82° 25.82’ W
Boat: Pearson 422
Posts: 12,391
Can't remember exactly as most long sails I've done we usually cranked the engine if the wind died and we had enough diesel to spare. I do recall on sail from St Thomas to Ft Lauderdale we had perfect winds the whole way and cranked the engine just to charge batteries.

I personally would not off the engine. Sometime real handy if you need to get home and the wind dies or you need a little extra push against a current or getting into your slip, whatever.
__________________

__________________
The water is always bluer on the other side of the ocean.
skipmac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2009, 19:56   #3
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Cruising NC, FL, Bahamas, TCI & VIs
Boat: 1964 Pearson Ariel 'Faith' / Pearson 424, sv Emerald Tide
Posts: 1,531
We have gone over a month in the Bahamas island hopping, sailing on and off the anchor without starting the motor... but that is on a small boat. (An Ariel, a more narrow and heavier full keel Person).

I think a Sailor would be fine with an electric outboard... unless you are cruising the ICW or other restricted waters. Then a small (we use 6hp) outboard would be preferable.
__________________
s/v 'Faith' is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2009, 20:44   #4
Senior Cruiser
 
nautical62's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Live Iowa - Sail mostly Bahamas
Boat: Beneteau 32.5
Posts: 2,264
Images: 12
Had an inboard die on me in the Bahamas. Continued on with out it and back to Florida without even a dingy motor. I was surprised at how little a burden not having a motor was. (until it was time to go up the Okechobee waterway).
__________________
nautical62 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2009, 21:56   #5
Senior Cruiser
 
maxingout's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Fort Pierce, Phoenix
Boat: Privilege 39 Catamaran, Exit Only
Posts: 2,606
When I'm sailing offshore, I'll run the engines every day for battery charging. When I'm anchored in the tropics with the tradewinds blowing, I may go for weeks without running an engine because I have good wind generators reliabily providing power.

When I am sailing, I have an electric boat. There's refrigeration, fans, radar, gps, computers, lights, radar, autopilot, and watermaker all sucking amps. If I'm charging my batteries, I usually put my engine in gear to give me a little extra push.
__________________
Dave -Sailing Vessel Exit Only

http://SailingUNI.com
http://maxingout.com
http://PositiveThinkingSailor.com
maxingout is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2009, 22:20   #6
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,413
Interesting thread. We usually use the motor to leave the anchorage and when returning.

But I have had some amazing sails. One memorable one was when we were returning from one September ME to Greenport located between the two forks at the end of LI. We were anchored in Cuttyhunk, MA.

It was a long sail, perhaps as much as 80 miles (guess I don't have the charts handy). We awoke to a strong NE with a lee shore and a good think the anchor held. I turned the motor on to retrieve the anchor with the windlass and continued NE to raise the sails. I went for full hoise main and rolled out the 135. And killed the motor and set our course to the west.

We departed in the AM before 7, I would have to check the log, but it was light out as I recall. We arrived at 4pm

We hit the tide exactly and got lifted by it. The only boats we encountered that windy day were a few trawlers coming out of New Bedford MA and a fleet of big racing sailboats south of Newport.

Never had the motor on and was sweating bullets as the wind built to almost gale force and I had the full main. I rolled in the Genny and dread a gybe as the wind backed and we were often on a dead run.

I finally was forced to gybe OUCH that was scary in the last mile or two. By the time we sailed into the protected Stirling Harbor at about 4 pm we had covered the distance of about 100 miles with no motoring except to run the windlass and set the sails in 9 hrs. So we had done it at hull speed plus a lift of several knots of current the whole way. WOW that was some sail.

I've also sailed from Shelter Island to Newport on a SW without the motor - 55 miles several times and recently sailed from Stonington to Sag Harbor without the motor a mere 30 miles or so.

The longest runs were heading south between Bermuda and Antigua where we wouldn't fire up the engine except to charge the batts for days.
__________________
Sandero is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2009, 22:47   #7
CF Adviser
 
Bash's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: sausalito
Boat: 14 meter sloop
Posts: 7,260
ditto

Quote:
Originally Posted by maxingout View Post
When I'm sailing offshore, I'll run the engines every day for battery charging.
One of the reasons I finally installed a wind generator is that I couldn't sail much more than 48 hours without needing to turn on the engine to charge the house bank.

It's never seemed fair that it takes so much more power to sail than to anchor.
__________________
cruising is entirely about showing up--in boat shoes.
Bash is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2009, 23:25   #8
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Bellingham WA
Boat: 17' faering Ironblood, building 34' schooner Javelin
Posts: 305
I have never had an engine in my sailboats. Larger boats included a 26' ketch and a 34' gaff rigged schooner, hard chine aluminum. Sailed the schooner from Puget Sound to Calif, out to Hawaii and home. Ocean sailing without an engine is the easy part. I guess all told somewhere around 10,000 miles under sail, no engine. Longest single sail was from Honolulu to Seattle. when my partner and I got to Honolulu from Port Townsend we were a bit tired, and really looking forward to cold drinks and ice cream. A big fancy boat came in shortly after we arrived, probably more money in engines than I had in my entire boat. They were a mess. Turns out both [yeah!] of their engines had quit half way over. Lost all their food, because it was in the freezer, no running water, etc. Engines are more trouble than they are worth, and without one you can be comfortable in a boat 1/2 to 2/3 the size of the boat with an engine. They take up enormous amounts of room, they stink up the boat, and when you really need them, they quit. I have been long distance sailing on three auxiliary boats, and the all three engines quit. When we 'needed' them. If you have a Pearson Renegade, you can sail that thing into and out of any slip in America. That sweetie sails like a dinghy. Sell you motor and put the money into a couple of solar panels and a couple of batteries. That will give you all the electric power anybody needs. Reading light, running light, laptop. You need something else?
__________________
MichaelC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2009, 01:28   #9
Senior Cruiser
 
44'cruisingcat's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 7,459
Images: 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by SURV69 View Post
I have had it with my "gas" outboard. It's pretty new, pretty unreliable, pretty loud and idles too fast(even after 3 tune-ups).

SO, I am seriously thinking of going electric.

Of course EVERYONE is trying to talk me out of it because of lack of power and lack of distance capability(on the motor).

NOW . . . unless I missed something, these ARE SAILBOATS, right?

I mean, these boats should generally be sailed . . . not powered.

ANYWAY, with this thought in mind, I wonder how long(time) or far some of the members have sailed without ever turning on their auxillary power?

I know Lin and Larry Pardey sailed without a motor, but they're rather extraordinary.

If you're looking for a propulsion system to not use very often why spend any money on it, when you already have one?

Electrics need batteries, which are heavy and expensive, a system to charge them - expensive, and after all that money, you still want to use them as little as possible.

In answer to the question, we sailed a cat (fitted with outboard motors) across the Gulf Of Carpenteria, 350nm in 44 hours without running the engine apart from leaving the anchorage.
__________________
44'cruisingcat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2009, 02:58   #10
Registered User
 
swagman's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Winter land based UK New Forest. Summer months away. Making the transition from sail to power this year - scary stuff.
Boat: Super Van Craft 1320 Power Yacht
Posts: 2,175
Images: 10
Send a message via Skype™ to swagman
Guess you are really asking the question on similar sized boats - those who tend to go day sailing as opposed to longer distances? One of our earlier boats was a 30 foot aluminium racerr and it was too much hard graft putting the outboard on and off - so we went almost a year without using it at all.
Once you get familiar, and if you've set up your mooring / pen OK, then sailing in and out gets to be quite easy - and lots of fun.
But don't throw it way - you never know when the mast will fall down.

JOHN
__________________
Don't take life too seriously. No ones going to make it out alive......Go see our blog at http://www.sailblogs.com/member/yachtswagman/
swagman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2009, 03:29   #11
Registered User
 
fishwife's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: South coast of England, moving around a bit.
Boat: Long range motor cruiser
Posts: 750
In recent times I've never been without a motor and I'm not afraid to use it.
Thirty years ago, I sailed from Gibraltar to Mar Del Plata without an engine using a towed generator for power.

P.
__________________
The message is the journey, we are sure the answer lies in the destination. But in reality, there is no station, no place to arrive at once and for all. The joy of life is the trip, and the station is a dream that constantly out distances us”. Robert Hastings, The Station
fishwife is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2009, 04:19   #12
Registered User
 
bmartinsen's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Grand Cayman
Boat: Lavranos 39 S/v Continental Drift
Posts: 88
5 days on the same tack. From Cayman to Columbia. We had wind gen and solarpower and 20-30kts wind on beam. Then had to motor last 3 hrs into harbour(zero wind). Couldn't be without engine for long and enjoy being where we are or where we have been. Here in Cayman we only use it to get on and off dock but being down a canal we would have difficulty getting on or off the dock about half of the time.
We use about 5 gals every 3-4months.

Electric has come a long way but check the discussions, it's not for everyone.
__________________
bmartinsen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2009, 05:54   #13
Registered User
 
speciald@ocens.'s Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: On the boat - Carib, Chesapeake
Boat: 58 Taswell AS
Posts: 1,139
Last year, I broke the drive saver on my shaft and sailed the next 800 miles into the Village Key Marina on Tortola. Didn't need the engine anyway as the wind was great. The only problem was stopping the 70,000 pound boat when we reached the t-head.
__________________
speciald@ocens. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2009, 07:43   #14
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Hudson Valley N.Y.
Boat: contessa 32
Posts: 826
If no time pressures you can get about any where w/o engine, its been happening for thousands of years with boats that did not sail like any thing available today. Bridges and the ICW are adifferent story but have gotten buy by begging tows from passing boats.Still,i love my engine when it works nowadays.Get a boat that sails well,go minimal with electrics,provision s etc. .and pretend its the 17th century .Its totally doable. Tell all you may not be back to work monday and keep a good log it may the most exciting time (and often boring) of your life.
__________________
mrohr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2009, 12:16   #15
Registered User
 
Lost Horizons's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Portage, MI
Boat: Temporary boatless
Posts: 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by SURV69 View Post

I have had it with my "gas" outboard.


SO, I am seriously thinking of going electric.
I had a similar experience with my previous boat (21 footer with 2200 pounds of dry displacement). Replaced a Yamaha with a 36V Minn Cota trolling motor fed by 3 group 27 batteries. This set up afforded motoring up to 3 hours at 3.5-4 knots or so at 1/2 to 2/3 "throttle" in calm conditions.

I never had a problem with motoring range sailing around Miami/Florida Keys 2-3 days at a time, but I would not take the electric boat to a longer trip, such as to Dry Tortugas, unless I could recharge the batteries during the trip and/or had enough time to wait for the right weather.

The main problem was motoring against the wind. With a 20 kn wind, the boat could only reach 2 knots or so. In a narrow channel where you cannot tack it can be a problem, particularly if there is a current.

If I did it again, I would double the power of the motor to get approximately 1 kW per 1000 pounds of displacement.
__________________

__________________
Lost Horizons is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Motoring Range to Cross the Pacific bulabro Monohull Sailboats 38 17-06-2010 15:24
Motoring Time peter.bomberg General Sailing Forum 30 19-08-2009 07:11
Motoring South From Atlantic City NJ - Miami Florida In September Barbie Atlantic & the Caribbean 0 07-09-2008 12:19



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 08:41.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.