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Old 30-10-2015, 10:53   #16
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Re: Would you consider buy a boat that sank?

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Originally Posted by dmksails View Post
Hi! I'm somewhat new to the boating world and am looking for my first boat. There is one that has caught my eye, but I'm leary as it sank once while at dock. It was raised within 24 hours.

Ignoring the engine and anything electrical - how much of an issue is this? Would the deck core likely be affected? What about wiring? The stove would probably be shot. The head?
Ask how much they will pay you to take it off their hands.
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Old 30-10-2015, 10:57   #17
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Re: Would you consider buy a boat that sank?

The thought that getting water in a boat ruins it is a bit ludicrous.

How many of your boats have water over the sole? Never broached or had a big wave hit the cockpit and drench everything below decks?

As for salt water on electrical components, start with a thorough bath with fresh water before applying power and change motor brushes and bearings.

I have dealt with a number of commercial vessels that let the bilge get above the shafts and needed a major cleanup.





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Old 30-10-2015, 11:31   #18
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Re: Would you consider buy a boat that sank?

To DMKSAILS.

In Answer to your question about buying a previously sunk boat I would say NO!

In the end it will cost you more than a comparable one that has not been sunk. even if the one you were considering is initially is free.

If you want to get sailing and do not have much money? be very aware that since the prime plus mortgage crash in 2008 many people were to broke to keep their boats,

Some took them into a sheltered bay and dropped the anchor. Perhaps; with hope to get back to them later. That seldom happens so this is now known as the abandoned boat problem, In many places in North America, state and local governments are budgeting to clean this up Some research might enable you to find a better one worth salvaging.

Visit the marina's in your area and look for derelict boats on the dry land storage, and check at the office for vessel;s seriously behind on their payments. You could become the new owner by paying for the arrears. Marina management ultimately have these pulled and scrapped, Then attempt to collect the costs from the owner.

Call all your local Boat movers. They are sometimes paid as much a $4,400 by owners to pull their boat out of the water to take it away and destruct it IF you take one of these off their hands you save them the trouble. Recently an insurance company round here paid $10,000 to have a large wooden vessel disposed of.

So be very aware that it is very easy to spend more on a project than the resale value. Make sure you have clear in your mind where you will keep one, what that will cost, and be sure you can afford it.
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Old 30-10-2015, 11:32   #19
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Re: Would you consider buy a boat that sank?

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Originally Posted by Cap Erict3 View Post
The thought that getting water in a boat ruins it is a bit ludicrous.

How many of your boats have water over the sole? Never broached or had a big wave hit the cockpit and drench everything below decks?

As for salt water on electrical components, start with a thorough bath with fresh water before applying power and change motor brushes and bearings.

I have dealt with a number of commercial vessels that let the bilge get above the shafts and needed a major cleanup.


He didn't say water over the sole. He said sunk. If it was raised in a day and nothing was done? It may have been better off under water until something was to be done.

I think he said new to boating what a bad introduction. People with experience will discount ones that have sank.

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He didn't say water over the sole. He said sunk. If it was raised in a day and nothing was done? It may have been better off under water until something was to be done.

I think he said new to boating what a bad introduction. People with experience will discount ones that have sank.
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Old 30-10-2015, 11:40   #20
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Re: Would you consider buy a boat that sank?

I've worked on boats that have sunk. And I have handled claims on them. And I've owned a small one that did. The more complex the boat the more I would say no. Now I would buy a sunk boat would I recommend anyone else do it? No.
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Old 30-10-2015, 11:47   #21
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Re: Would you consider buy a boat that sank?

I think an important question to ask is.

What Boat are we talking about?

A west wight potter? I mean, the boat and size along with the amount of electricals are in fact a big part of the decision making process.

The op wrote:
"Hi! I'm somewhat new to the boating world and am looking for my first boat. There is one that has caught my eye, but I'm leary as it sank once while at dock. It was raised within 24 hours.

Ignoring the engine and anything electrical - how much of an issue is this? Would the deck core likely be affected? What about wiring? The stove would probably be shot. The head?"

We are on here making assumptions on inboard vs outboard or tons of electrical vs a few cabin lights and running lights.

Op, can you post more information on the boat so as that the advice will be more specific to your situation?
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Old 30-10-2015, 11:57   #22
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Re: Would you consider buy a boat that sank?

If it is truly a sunk? Run don't walk. JMHO
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Old 30-10-2015, 12:23   #23
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Re: Would you consider buy a boat that sank?

Short answer "no". Assuming it was salt water that is. Fresh water? Possibly but probably not. There is a very nice design 70s IOR style 36' glass yacht moored near mine. It hasn't been under water but it has been neglected and not used for years with rain water getting inside and the propellor a birds nest of weed etc. I wouldn't take it as a gift as it would cost too much to put right.



There are many boats in good condition for sale that you can try out and know what you are getting. If you want cheaper, go smaller.
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Old 30-10-2015, 12:50   #24
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Re: Would you consider buy a boat that sank?

Quote:
Originally Posted by dmksails View Post
Hi! I'm somewhat new to the boating world and am looking for my first boat. There is one that has caught my eye, but I'm leary as it sank once while at dock. It was raised within 24 hours.

Ignoring the engine and anything electrical - how much of an issue is this? Would the deck core likely be affected? What about wiring? The stove would probably be shot. The head?
I'd be cautious, Not so much about the deck core, at least due to the sinking, but certainly the wiring and any item that uses or provides electricity. Your abilities, budget, and the price are huge considerations, as is what was done, and how, and how quickly it was done after she was raised. What the seller has spent on recovery is not your concern, but why she sank and any neglect that caused or contributed to the sinking is something to deeply think about beyond the sinking itself. Bottom line: probably not a good idea,but remotely possible
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Old 30-10-2015, 13:32   #25
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Re: Would you consider buy a boat that sank?

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I'd be cautious, Not so much about the deck core, at least due to the sinking, but certainly the wiring and any item that uses or provides electricity. Your abilities, budget, and the price are huge considerations, as is what was done, and how, and how quickly it was done after she was raised. What the seller has spent on recovery is not your concern, but why she sank and any neglect that caused or contributed to the sinking is something to deeply think about beyond the sinking itself. Bottom line: probably not a good idea,but remotely possible

He asked about deck core, galley stove and the head. Read the post. No mention of a teak filled dock queen or a gadget filled space shuttle wanna be.

How much damage do you thing the jabsco head took? The likely stainless cooktop?

I picked up a 1969 Columbia 26 for peanuts that is a blast to sail. Turns a 360 in a teacup and points like a cat boat. Looked like hell when I bought it. A little cosmetic work took it a long way in a couple of weeks.


Will the boat sail? Does the bilge stay dry? What condition are rigging, hull, sails and rudder?


It is easy to let any boat become a money pit but it doesn't have be an Americas Cup contender to be a day sailor.




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Old 30-10-2015, 13:36   #26
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Re: Would you consider buy a boat that sank?

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Originally Posted by Cap Erict3 View Post
He asked about deck core, galley stove and the head. Read the post. No mention of a teak filled dock queen or a gadget filled space shuttle wanna be.

How much damage do you thing the jabsco head took? The likely stainless cooktop?

I picked up a 1969 Columbia 26 for peanuts that is a blast to sail. Turns a 360 in a teacup and points like a cat boat. Looked like hell when I bought it. A little cosmetic work took it a long way in a couple of weeks.


Will the boat sail? Does the bilge stay dry? What condition are rigging, hull, sails and rudder?


It is easy to let any boat become a money pit but it doesn't have be an Americas Cup contender to be a day sailor.

T


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That's pretty much what I was trying to get at
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Old 30-10-2015, 13:50   #27
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Re: Would you consider buy a boat that sank?

Yes, buy it, assuming it sunk in salt water. The salt will pickle any wood. If its a diesel engine, just flush well with oil, spray all electrical connections with lps 2, and if needed, put a dehumidifier aboard to dry out any residual moisture.
I bought a boat that had sunk and did the above tasks. Sailed it for five years in the pacific. No problems. Insurance not a problem. They do not care if it sunk, just that it will not sink while insured by you.
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Old 30-10-2015, 13:52   #28
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Re: Would you consider buy a boat that sank?

Quote:
Originally Posted by dmksails View Post
Hi! I'm somewhat new to the boating world and am looking for my first boat. There is one that has caught my eye, but I'm leary as it sank once while at dock. It was raised within 24 hours.

Ignoring the engine and anything electrical - how much of an issue is this? Would the deck core likely be affected? What about wiring? The stove would probably be shot. The head?
There was beautiful wooden boat sunken in Antigua during Hurricane Georges. There was a lot of damage in that hurricane.

Some one decided to raise her and restore her. After raising her and starting work, the guy had to go home to earn more money to finish her. While he was gone another hurricane came through and blew her over on a mound of dirt, she was on stands, caving in her side. So after some suing and more time, 3 years later and about the price of a new boat, maybe more, the new owner had a beautiful 120' wooden yacht.

So yeah, go a head, but you should have deep pockets, be a lawyer or be a lawyer with deep pockets.
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Old 30-10-2015, 13:56   #29
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Re: Would you consider buy a boat that sank?

What about a cat that had been flipped? I thought I heard that the Gunboat at the Annapolis boat show had turned turtle somewhere...St Maartan?

Not the OP's question, but a good question none the less, even if I do say so.
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Old 30-10-2015, 14:07   #30
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Re: Would you consider buy a boat that sank?

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Originally Posted by dmksails View Post
Hi! I'm somewhat new to the boating world and am looking for my first boat. There is one that has caught my eye, but I'm leary as it sank once while at dock. It was raised within 24 hours.

Ignoring the engine and anything electrical - how much of an issue is this? Would the deck core likely be affected? What about wiring? The stove would probably be shot. The head?
Find a floating boat you can afford.
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