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Old 05-04-2006, 05:56   #91
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Weyalan, and you had the good sense to buy a VandeStadt.
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Old 05-04-2006, 10:30   #92
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As a member of the "buy large first" club on this forum, and having been duly chastised for it..

Our first trip got us into some pretty rough stuff, fuel problems and all the associated fun. We never once felt as if the boat was not up to the task, but we DID wonder how much worse it would have seemed to us had we been on a smaller boat. From strictly a comfort of the crew perspective I mean..

Yes I am intimidated by some of the 'BIG' things, but these are things that I can learn and adapt to before venturing out too far. For example, hanking on the new genoa 2 days ago - man that's a BIG sail and I've never done this before... How much wind can we tolerate dockside while hoisting that bad boy up? After all the questions and anxiety, the sail is on just fine, we did not lose anyone overboard nor did we damage the sail.

I guess my point is - I have to learn to sail, not how to handle boats & the basic seamanship aspect of it all (skills we already have). So if I learn to sail on a small boat, then I have to also learn to adapt to living in a smaller space. Here, after I learn to sail well - not planning for the Volvo - I will at least be more comfortable on my bigger boat.

Like Gord points out, when we go cruising it will (hopefully) be a series of short hops between anchorages. That's my version of the cruising dream anyway... Others have their version too.

It's ALL GOOD!! :cubalibre
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Old 05-04-2006, 14:51   #93
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Wow - Lots of things to respond to for this thread. First, I agree with BC Mike C that a small boat is the ideal way to learn and practice sailing. But I will qualify that with agreement with Kai Nui that dinghy sailing will get your basic skill set and practice without living in the water. The only time that I would recommend using a laser or simillar type 'board with a sail' would be in tropical waters where you won't have the problem of hypothermia after making a couple of mistakes. I would also think that it would depend on the type of sailing you expect to do.

Kai Nui - gosh... wasn't it one of those Lido 14 races where you obtained your Mud Hen award and caused an unscheduled MOB drill? (actually he waded ashore - but we'll not worry about that).

As for reefing ... well, as I mentioned before, Scott has much more experience reefing than I. We both own ketch rigged boats, but my boat is much heavier and likes more wind than Scott's. When it is time to reef on my boat, I tend to completely lower the main, and, if not already raised, raise the mizzen and sail 'jib and jiggers'. If it gets heavier than that, I will reef both the jib and the mizzen. When I had my mizzen made, I had them put a second reef point way the hell up the sail. Because, if I ever have to go that deep of a reef in the mizzen, I will most likely be heaving to using the mizzen and completely furl the jib.

Thomas
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Old 05-04-2006, 18:31   #94
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Smile

I am fairly new to sailing (one year) and the reason we bought small to start was first to make sure we liked it, so we started with a 1972 22' McGregor thought if we didn't take to sailing even if we gave it away we wouldn't be out much. When we knew sailing was for us we decided to go larger so we moved up to a 28' Pearson. I love this boat and if an emergency happens I could sail this alone. We are seriously considering living aboard and maybe then we will go larger. We are in our mid 50's so we got a rather late start, and maybe because of our age I was a little more concerned about being able to deal with emergencies and not have to worry about trying to sail a boat that was way to big for one person new to sailing to handle.
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Old 05-04-2006, 23:03   #95
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Finding a partner - :::sigh::: yes what a great idea.

Anyway, after having owned a couple of dinghy and small keelboats when I was young, I decided that I would NOT do the 'step at a time' transition up to the 'final' large boat for cruising. As I mention in my web site (www.sv-elusive.com) I waiting and bought the boat that I felt would fit my cruising needs when I could afford it and when "it" was available.

I could not see spending $XX for boat A, putting in time and more $$ and then selling it for $X and doing this in increments of 4 feet (or so), eventually winding up with a large boat. Too much time and money wasted on the 'wrong' boat.

Just my 3 cents.

Thomas
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Old 05-04-2006, 23:25   #96
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Thomas, that epic (if you ask Susan) sinking was aboard a fatty knees. Never sunk the Lido. And... If nothing else, I am good at being a bad example. We worked our way up to the big boat, ony to find out it was too big, and are now working our way back down. Granted, there some other reasons for the trimaran, but the 40 footer is just too overwhelming for my better half. I admit we have had a few white knuckle rides on this boat, but, unlike our smaller boats (34' and 28'), Susan just does not feel she can control any aspect of this boat in other than ideal conditions.
That reefing incident we were talking about was on our 34 footer. Aside from her being a bit nervous when I would disappear into the waves while changing the headsail, she was always quite comfortable on that boat.
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Old 06-04-2006, 15:14   #97
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Kai, What did you order (multihull?) and when do you get it?
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Old 06-04-2006, 17:54   #98
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Markpj23, I know a couple on a 53 norseman. They have sailed many places and done just fine by themselves. They do have most things at the helm via hydraulics and electrics, but he and his wife do everything almost equal.

I understand why people like to chismis that it's to big. Many friends have talked about getting boats, then down sizing because they think 40-45 is to big, but I'm with you get what you like and are comfortable with and learn to sail and be good with your own boat and you will be happier with your choice. The thing I found with my boat is much room in the salon, need to install grab rails for rough weather.I would prbably have lowered my dersires had I bought a smaller boat. I will spend more time a anchorage when I get outta' here(won't be in any hurry to get anywhere).
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Old 06-04-2006, 18:19   #99
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Randy, not quite a new boat. She is a 1981 Piver Lodestar. We bought here in mid refit. She is a bare hull with a rig. All the goodies are in hand (a new Yanmar courtesy of Never Monday, a new stove from Ebay, etc. etc.) There is a thread about it in the Multihull section. It is 37' overall, and, for us, is the perfect combo of big enough to be comfortable, yet small and light enough enough to sail easily. It is surprising how many books and surveys say 37' is the ideal size for a cruising couple. I guess we will find out.
Lakbay, are you talking about the boat in Pittsburg? I have to say, that was a nice boat. Hyd winches, roller furling everything. Somehow that $300000 price tag discouraged me.
The grab rail issue is another problem with the Challenger. There is plent of room, but no where to hang on. We considered putting grab rails on the ceiling, but Susan can not reach them. Besides, when S/VElusive comes over, he would hit his head on them. Man, sometimes you just can't win
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Old 06-04-2006, 19:46   #100
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Kai the pricetag of that boat was 450,000 four years ago I think. But it hasd a wine cellar and a full workshop.
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Old 06-04-2006, 19:50   #101
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Gotta admit, I was droolin.
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Old 06-04-2006, 20:05   #102
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Kai,
You know for thw size of a salon maybe small jackline type setup inside would be a thought. As you know my spouse is really short and these are things I think about.

I saw a thread on this forum somewhere about led lights. I just bought them and think their pretty neat and bright. I got reading light and three for walkway accents. When installed I will see how much I like them.
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Old 06-04-2006, 20:19   #103
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Lakbay, http://cruisersforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=3496
Check this thread out. Please post some info there on the LED's
As for the jackline set-up, we considered that. Also considered mounting padeyes to the coach roof to hang knotted ropes, but just couldn't get past the look of such a set up. A non issue now, since we will be going to the smaller boat, but I think this is a very real concern on larger boats. Especially for crew of smaller stature. Imagine having kids aboard the Challenger. The only thing they could hold onto in the main saloon is the table, and I would not trust it in a rough sea. The potential to get thrown a long way accross the saloon is of great concern to us. No chance of that on the smaller boat. or at least far less chance.
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Old 07-04-2006, 15:13   #104
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Scott - I can just see Susan swinging from rope to rope --- she would be at HOME!!!!! They are easy to take down when anchored/moored/docked and when you have guests over ... although those dang pad eyes might be a problem when *I* come over.

Thomas
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Old 07-04-2006, 18:50   #105
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The tri is only 6'4" headroom. Guess I should put some accomodations on deck eh?
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