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Old 19-01-2006, 21:21   #61
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Old 19-01-2006, 21:23   #62
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Small

My definition of a small boat is a Laser, a small keel boat is 22 feet, a medium sized boat is a Catalina 30 and a big boat is 40 feet and up.
Most folks who try racing do not do very well for quite some time. If they had of sailed a Laser they would do much better much sooner.
Someone could sail a Catalina 30 for many years and not be able to sail a Laser on a windy day. An X Laser sailor could sail the Catalina 30 in any conditions.
If you want to learn to sail, get a small boat with one sail and put one person in it, on a breezy day and a windless day.
Just my opinion.
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Old 19-01-2006, 21:29   #63
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Well, BC Mike C.

If I were to get that kind of boat. I'd might as well call myself a minnow?
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Old 19-01-2006, 21:45   #64
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Michael, I agree with your definitions, however, I do not necessarily agree that a laser or sinfish is the ideal boat to learn on. A small boat, or dinghy that is a little less tender, and a bit kinder to the crew is better for some of us. I have sailed extensively on Santana 22's. After a few hours of sailing on those boats, I feel like I have been in a fight. I would much rather be on a WW19, or my old Space Sailor 20. Both are small and responsive, but they do not beat you up nearly as bad. In the smaller range is the ' fatty knees. Very stable, and they really give you a good feel for what how the wind and seas affect a boat. Just my opinion. I have done some racing, but it is just not my cup o tea. I would much rather weekend on the Space Sailor, and gunkhole in the fatty knees.
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Old 19-01-2006, 21:48   #65
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Old 19-01-2006, 22:07   #66
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Laser and others

The Laser seems to get more uncomfortable as we get older, but they are still first class for learning how to get to windward on a breezy day. If I had a dinghy I think I would prefer a Thistle. Always liked cats to, so a Hobie 18 would be nice. Used to own number 139 from the very first batch.
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Old 19-01-2006, 22:35   #67
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We have Phoenix, Santana #1 at our yacht club. Wicked looking boat, but she is not quite as fast as some of the later hulls. The club has a small fleet of Lido 14's. They are fun to sail around the harbor, and really forgiving for the beginning sailor. We do some tight quarters racing with them once or twice a year when we can pull enough people away from the bar.
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Old 19-01-2006, 22:38   #68
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Getting drunk instead of sailing. Huh, Kai ?
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Old 19-01-2006, 22:42   #69
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I have to admit our reputation precedes us as a drinking club with a sailing problem Actually we have a good mix. We have fishermen, racers, drinkers, and cruisers. We all find time to enjoy the other interests, but we all have our specialty
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Old 10-02-2006, 18:44   #70
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Excuse me but a forty foot boat is not a extremely large boat . I am partually disabled fifty plus man bad back .arms shoulders and I Sail a GS 39 alone and need no help to tie up . When I bring people with me it just messes me up wrong line etc. I admit in a strong cross current I need help but slingle handing a forty foot properly set up is not a problem . I moved a 65 foot fishing dragger around alone . Big heavy boats don"t repond to the elements as fast . I would not try it in a storm or adverse conditions but docking normally is not a problem . I made my living on commercial fishing trawlers up to 125 ft now thats a big boat. My 40 ft is a toy to that. Lets put it this way it is smaller than the life boats on some ships . The forty foot pleasure boat is just big on dollars to keep and maintain not to handle.
Just how big is big?
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Old 10-02-2006, 19:18   #71
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A 40 footer is not extremely large, but it is large. Speaking as someone who owns both a 40 footer and a 28 footer, and who has single handed both, I can honestly say I much prefer the 28 footer, with one exception. When anchored out for a few days it can get a bit cramped. Our 40 footer is not crowded with 6 dinner guests. That being said, handing the main on our 40' ketch is a real handfull, and My wife can not reef that sail herself (slab reefing). The main on the 28' cutter has 3 reefs. I have had to use 2 since I have owned her, and at no time did I feel like I was fighting the sail. When we both go out on the 28 footer, my wife does all the sail work, and I stay at the helm. No matter how you look at it, a 40 foot sail boat is a large boat. Too large? maybe for some. Not for others.
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Old 01-04-2006, 09:44   #72
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Sometimes people with their dockside apartments do funny things. Years ago a fellow had a 39 ft Searay in the next finger down from me. I saw him use it twice a year for two years. During this time there wasw a for sale sign on the boat. One day a man came and told him I will give you 55K f cash for the boat if it surveys ok. When the surveyor gave the boat a value of 60K the seller wouldn't sell for 55 because it valued out at 60. needless to say the boat sat for almost 3 years before selling.
I think that is the mindset of entry level boaters who haven't got a clue.
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Old 01-04-2006, 09:51   #73
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I have a 45 foot boat. I am able to handle it fine. This year I will move the lines to make more for singlehandling as I am planning to do longer passages and will spend more time at the helm and need the KISS principle. The size of the boat is because I like long hot showers and the first mate needs other things.
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Old 01-04-2006, 10:04   #74
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I can agree with Lakbay on that topic. As long as you can rig up a longer boat for singlehand sailing. Then "yeah". You could do that.

Of course you're also spending more money on hardware to convert it over to that setup. And the principle behind to KISS method (Keep It Simple Stupid)!!!
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Old 01-04-2006, 10:16   #75
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In the beginnig of this thread the ? was something like How is a Hunter 42 an entry level boat I read a lot of replies and I think they are a production condo for the waterfront living. Never have seen one doing the Baha-ha-ha which is done annually from SF to Cabo. Most that I have seen in the bay are in their slips or in winds less than 10.
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