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Old 16-01-2006, 07:28   #31
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I have to agree with Randy. We currently have a 43' which with furling main and jib I can single hand easily. We are moving up to a high performance 47' cruising boat for long term cruising and liveaboard. It is absolutely the smallest boat my wife would consider. It weighs only slightly more than my 43' and has only slightly more sail area so it will be no more difficult to handle. If you want to do the intercoastal waterway you really can't go much bigger than this. You really don't want more than 6' of draft or more than 64' of air draft. This was one of the main criteria for us in boat selection. OTOH I've never met the man yet that didn't buy the biggest boat he could afford.
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Old 16-01-2006, 07:36   #32
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Great last 6 words. here's a story about a guy who did the ICW called "The Biggest Boat I Could Afford" A hilarous read.
http://www.sheridanhouse.com/catalog...ggestboat.html
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Old 16-01-2006, 09:57   #33
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I love it :-). Hope you don't mind if I borrow it.
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Old 16-01-2006, 10:10   #34
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Does Size Matter?

Be careful with the "we buy big boats because of our wives" argument. There was a recent tongue-in-cheek editorial along these lines in Cruising World, pretty much blaming women for the "condo at the dock" syndrome, and some women sailors responded with fire and brimstone. If anything, the happy wife down below with the washing machines is an extension of the "women don't sail" myth, and the even more important "men must be captains" myth.

I'm planning a new thread on this soon. I think that most guys do such a completely rotten job of introducing their significant others to sailing that they deserve to have their dreams dashed. (Okay, honey, here's where I scream at you as we approach the dock.)

Women sailors I know (including those who started late in life) are much more interested in deck hardware, sails and windward performance than acres of space below.

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Old 16-01-2006, 10:15   #35
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My girl is the one that screams at me as she tries to teach me
She had to placate my parents that she knew what she was doing and we would be safe. This is after I have spent 16 years at sea, half of them as skipper.
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Old 16-01-2006, 10:34   #36
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I think, to be fair, prior comments were not referring to women "sailors" per se, more women who sail. I love my wife more than life itself and if she didn't want to take off cruising for 5 years I'd be doing something else right now. That said, her interest is traveling the world unfettered, beautiful anchorages and spending time with other cruisers (some of the best people you'll ever know in my experience).

I think you'd have a hard time substantiating a claim that women "sailors" are not a minority when compared to women who sail. There are of course many women sailors and some of them are as good as sailors come, in any flavor. Yet Hal Roth, Nigel Calder, Jimmy Cornell and half of the guys you meet on the docks have wives who are no doubt better sailors than I, but were brought to sea by their men, not the other way around. There is a great book for couples on this phenomenon called "Changing Course" by Debra Cantrell and it speaks specifically to the needs of women in these situations. I learned a lot reading it and my wife loved it. Some statistics from the book: 78% of women who decided to go cruising had no prior sailing experience, 70% retained property ashore (relevant to the sell your stuff thread), 80% of women were initially resistant to the idea of cruising.

One more perspective. Respectfully,
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Old 16-01-2006, 10:43   #37
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80% of women were initially resistant to the idea of cruising.
Hmm, 110% of my women have been resistant to cruising.
Must be the nesting instinkt.

(No I don't scream when approacing the dock)

Even if my name was Bill Gates, and I could buy QE II, the wife would not want to go cruising.

Sad really.
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Old 16-01-2006, 19:45   #38
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Steak or mis-steak?

Quote:
True, True. And what is wrong with that? Why buy hamburger if you can aford a steak?
Steak or mis-steak?

I was looking at a 36' boat the day I learned about the 26'boat I bought. I had the 38k asking price in the bank, and was prepaired to pay cash.

The 26' boat was better built, required less time/money (almost same thing really) to cruise with.

The larger boat (a Morgan OI 36) had a few more systems, but took a lot more to get away from the dock. I went sailing this afternoon, as I did yesterday.... and do many times spending weekends out while I watch a marina full of (mostly) larger boats rot at the dock.

I have some fairly ambitious cruising plans, and I am sure there would be days I would like to have this or that.

I am glad I resisted the urge to 'go large'.

OBTW, if any feel the same way, you might want to visit http://sailfar.net/ it is a site for small boat sailors who plan to 'sailfar'.
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Old 16-01-2006, 20:07   #39
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A bigger boat can be a detriment to spouses who are considering following someone elses dream . We did get the bigger boat in consideration of my wife's comfort, but she is the one who is more comfortable on a smaller boat. When it comes to manuevering te boat in tight quarters, or handling rough weather, she would much rather be aboard a boat that is more responsive, and has smaller sails. This brings me back to my previous comment, the right size is a compromise between the biggest boat you can handle and the smallest boat you can comfortably live aboard.
My wife has a very practical approach to amenities on the boat. If it is something I want, I need to maintain it. If it is something she wants, she needs to maintain it. She does not want to deal with the additional power and freshwater generation needed for a washing machine. She is willing to put money, and give up space for her video games. I think this is the key point. If she wants it, and I have to keep it working, I will be put off by the extra effort for something I do not consider necessary. Not that I do not want to do things for her. Quite the contrary, but this way, when she decides to do away with something on the boat, I am not taking anything from her, or depriving her from anything.
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Old 16-01-2006, 21:54   #40
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Faith, thanks to the link to the sailfar site. Pretty cool. For 26 feet, the Ariel is impressive. I have nothing against larger boats at all (in the future, a 34-40 footer might be in the cards), but the simplicity and ease of sailing of smaller craft are hard to pass by. I'm not surprised that some people have two boats, mostly because they like getting out on the smaller craft for day sails.

That's one thing that confuses me a little about some of the discussions here. Are they always about Cruising (as in oceans or weeks at a time), or are they also about simply the joy of sailing (as in an afternoon "cruise"). Living aboard and traveling the seas could be a desired endpoint for most of us, but there's a lot of joy in the over-night to two-week trips that can be done frequently and on smaller boats in the meantime.

Like you, our family went out for a great 2.5 hour day sail yesterday between the rain showers. A simple 24 footer made it possible (Cal 24 club boat), and I hope we can do it again next weekend.

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Old 16-01-2006, 22:14   #41
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I agree with the joy of day sailing and the appropriateness of smaller size for the purpose. My club has three boats over 30 feet and something like 25 boats 30' and under. The smaller ones are used all the time. The larger ones are used on weekends to go to Catalina or Paradise Cove. It's pretty easy to get a Soling out of the slip and into the wind but it's another story with the 40'ers. The 40'ers are a lot more fun on a weekend with 4 couples aboard though.
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Old 17-01-2006, 00:55   #42
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Kind of takes this thread in a new direction. I agree that the smaller boat is a more sensible choice if you intend to weekend with it, but I think the manufacturers are more interested in selling caviar dreams. I do not ever recall seeing a good weekender at a shows getting the kind of exposure that the big boats get. I could have missed it, but all the boats I see getting all the exposure at shows are in that 34' plus cruiser catagory. THey usually put some McGreggor 26's and a couple of small club racers inside, but it is hard to spend any real time on these boats, and you do not get a feel for how they are on the water. This is rather surprising, considering that these boats are far more within the reach of the average person with a new interest in sailing. If I wer marketing for one of these companies, I would put a couple of decked out Catalina 270's or Hunter 27's out there, and drag people in by the ear.
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Old 17-01-2006, 07:31   #43
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I read an article a year or two ago about a couple in their 60's that bought a 56' Tayana. They had no problem sailing that boat anywhere that they wanted to go. This was the first time that I had heard anyone say that a big boat could be handled by a couple. My boat is well equiped to be handled by a shorthanded crew also. I think that big boats are getting a bad rap. I love the space, I want the space, therefore I need the space.
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Old 17-01-2006, 08:14   #44
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irwinsailor once whispered in the wind:
I read an article a year or two ago about a couple in their 60's that bought a 56' Tayana. They had no problem sailing that boat anywhere that they wanted to go.
The original owners of our boat bought their E52 at the young age of 63, sailed her around the world, and only reluctantly gave her up to us at age 76 when arthritis had made things too difficult. Even setup for short-handed sailing as she is, the maintenance chores became too much.

I agree with Gunner... "I love the space, I want the space, therefore I need the space." I probably won't go out as often as the smaller boats for afternoon sails, but I made that choice early on.

Any choice we make in life is a matrix of the compromises and trade-offs that make sense to us. Can't really say that one person's choices are better or worse than others.... since they are right for them.

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Old 17-01-2006, 11:44   #45
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[QUOTE]markpj23 once whispered in the wind:

Any choice we make in life is a matrix of the compromises and trade-offs that make sense to us. Can't really say that one person's choices are better or worse than others.... since they are right for them.

: cheers: [/B][/QUOTE

Well said. I could not agree more.
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