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Old 18-06-2008, 21:02   #31
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..... and leave the galley like Caligulas bath.
Thanks Mark!... I read that just before lunch!
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Old 19-06-2008, 00:23   #32
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Have a look at our Ships Articles
Loved it! I appreciate the tongue-in-cheek, as I think sometimes non-sailing guests (who hopefully are friends) may be overwhelmed by a barrage of rules. The point is to enjoy the boat, the sea, and each other.

Sarah
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Old 23-06-2008, 00:10   #33
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Excellent observations, suede. I love your "key-jar" concept.

Also, red is shorter than green, port is shorter than starboard, left is shorter than right.

TaoJones

PS: Shouldn't you credit George Carlin for your sig message?
I never cry, but I cried tonite with news of Georges passing. I'm glad I heeded your suggestion and gave credit where it was most certainly due before his untimely demise.........
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Old 23-06-2008, 02:01   #34
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I try to keep it safe and simple -

1/ The boat is really heavy even though it may seem not. If we are going to crash into another boat or a dock it's becuase I screwed up and it's my problem - Do not try to help me by fending off the boat or dock and do not put any of your limbs outside the boat. You are way more valuable than this boat.

2/ No one is allowed to sink the boat but me. If I decide to sink the boat I will tell you and then you can grab a lifevest from that locker. If you want to wear one all the time great but you don't have to. The exception is your kids. They stay in the cockpit & salon or they wear jackets. My kids don't - but they are my kids and I am the skipper and therefore by maritime law I am allowed to drown them if I want to.

3/ There is a toilet feel free to use it. It has a pump on it and instructions printed on it. If you need help ask me.

4/ If you want to help sail you can. I will give you a job to do and try not to yell at you too much. If you are an experienced sailor I will probably make you helm so I can relax and take a nap downstairs. If you don't want to help that's fine too. I'll just nap at the tiller.

I will always reef very early with guests on board - especially new guests. A heeled over boat as an introduction to sailing is like doing aerobatics as an introduction to flying.
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Old 23-06-2008, 02:05   #35
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Also, red is shorter than green, port is shorter than starboard, left is shorter than right.
Port (wine) is red - I learned, "There is no red port left."
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Old 23-06-2008, 10:31   #36
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I never cry, but I cried tonite with news of George's passing. I'm glad I heeded your suggestion and gave credit where it was most certainly due before his untimely demise.........
I hear you, suede. The world's a little less humorous today.

One of the funniest routines Carlin ever did, I think, was the one that dealt with how he and Richard Pryor were each trying to one-up the other in abusing their bodies. Pryor, of course, won that duel as he died 12 1/2 years before Carlin.

If they're together today, though, that's got to be one funny place to be.

TaoJones
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Old 27-06-2008, 11:58   #37
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We have, on our web site, a page for guests to read before joining us. See it at this link,
http://www.stateham.com/sunspotbaby/What2no.htm

When we have new guests aboard we always start with a tour of the boat and equipment using the following briefing as a guide.

SUNSPOT BABY CREW BRIEFING

GENERAL
Welcome aboard. Please excuse necessity of the briefing but there are several things to know to make your voyage on Sunspot Baby safe and comfortable.
BOATS ARE DIFFERENT
We seem to have many comforts of home but we are not connected to power, water, sewer, gas, etc. Therefore we must carry everything with us. Limited space means limited supply please conserve whenever possible
We are on the water, at the mercy of weather, water depth, and the movements of other boats and ships. Thus we must do many things differently than we do at home.
SAFETY
Trite but true a tidy boat really is a safe boat. One of the most important things we can do to be safe is to keep the boat neat and tidy. Don’t leave lines where they can trip or become entangled. Don’t leave items lying loose. When done with them, stow them properly.
Sunspot Baby like most catamarans is virtually unsinkable. If there is an accident, stay with the boat. Life jackets are in the port side locker and under the forward single berth. Safety harnesses and tethers are located just above the life jackets.
If we are going into situations where we will need them, we will give instruction on their use but feel free to wear them anytime you are uncomfortable whether we have asked you to don them or not.
There is a 10-man life raft in case of a catastrophic accident.
There are three fire extinguishers on Sunspot Baby. One in each hull and one in the main saloon. Please familiarize yourself with their location.
However, if you see a fire, don’t start to fight it. Tell the Captain and he will fight it or direct fighting it.
COMFORT
Stability: Catamarans don’t sway the way monohulls do and the motion under sail is closer to a rough train ride or a bumpy plane trip. The boat heels much less so decks, seats, and tables stay almost level. This increases comfort aboard.
Head Bumping: The entry hatch from the cockpit to the main saloon is not large and it is easy to hit your head when entering. Be careful.
Electrical: Most electrical appliances or gadgets can be run on the 110-volt system. There are outlets in both aft cabins and one each in the galley and main saloon. While not on shore power or the generator, 110-volt is supplied by an inverter. Not all equipment operates well on an inverter.
Please limit the number of items operating at any one time. We keep the fridge and freezer on at all times. Please be sure they are closed well after use.
The batteries must be kept charged for all the electrical equipment to work so when not on shore power the generator will be run twice each day to keep batteries charged.
There is one head, forward in the port hull. We will give further instructions on its use
SAILING
We hope you will participate in sailing the boat. George or Lynn will explain how to perform tasks until you are familiar with them. When the helmsman requests that sails be trimmed or to prepare to jibe or come about, please respond promptly. If you go to the forward deck while we are sailing, you may have to avoid sails as we come about.
EQUIPMENT AND USE
Propane: Primary control of propane is under forward deck. Ask the skipper if you need to operate it. It is usually on when guests are on the boat. Propane must also be turned on at two (2) electrical switches before the stove, oven, or hot water can be used. Turn on “Gas Control” on the main breaker panel and then the “Gas Control” switch on the small panel in the upper right hand corner.
The stove top lights by pushing knob down and rotating to first position. Hold down about 5 seconds after flame lights.
Oven, turn valve to pilot position and click red button until pilot lights. Wait about 5 minutes before turning up to cooking temperature.
Please remember to turn both switches off after use. The big switch is turned on first and off last.
Fresh Water: Water pressure must also be turned on before fresh water will come out of the faucets. Turn on “Water Pressure” before use and remember to turn it off after use.
Head: The marine head is easy to use and reliable if a few simple rules are followed. There are a lot of steps but they are all important. First, never put anything in the head you haven’t eaten (except toilet paper). Use the absolute minimum toilet paper.
To use the head
· Turn the valve to the wet position.
· Pump the handle a few times to get water in the bowl.
· Do your business.
· Pump water into bowl until it is completely clear (at least 5 times).
· Turn the valve to the dry position.
· Pump the bowl dry (at least 5 pumps).
· Turn the valve to the wet position.
· Pump a couple of times to get a little water in the bowl to create an air lock.
· Turn the valve to the dry position.
Clearing a clogged head is a NASTY job. Please don’t put your loving crewmembers through the experience.
In open water, waste goes directly overboard, so please be considerate if we have divers or swimmers in the water. When at the dock, don’t put any solids into the head. Go to the marina office to do the big jobs. If the holding tank is in use, additional instruction will be given.
Hot Water
The hot water is an “on demand” propane heater located in the head. It’s venting is not perfect so be sure the hatches are open in the head when using it. Both Gas Control switches must be in the on position to get hot water. We will instruct you on lighting the pilot before using hot water.
Dinghy
The dinghy is normally inflated and stowed on davits. We will walk you through launching and stowing it. If the dinghy is not inflated it is stowed in a bag and the outboard is stowed on the mount beside the port sugar scoop. We will demonstrate starting the engine when you are ready to use the dinghy.
WATER CONSERVATION
We have a limited amount of fresh water on board. All water for consumption is in water jugs. Although potable, we do not suggest drinking the water from the holding tanks.
When showering: get wet, turn off the water, soap up, turn on water and rinse off, turn water off again immediately. The showerhead has three positions spray, off, and stream. You can turn the shower off at the spray head and not lose your perfect mix of hot and cold.
When doing dishes: don’t run to the faucet to rinse dishes. run a little fresh water in the sink and rinse with that, when in areas with clean seawater, use the seawater pump at the galley sink for washing dishes.
Feel free to use the water you need but please don’t waste. Of course if we are in a marina we can refill anytime we want.

Feel free to borrow from these if you find them helpful.

The most improtant thing to teach them is how to work the head :-)

George
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Old 29-06-2008, 07:52   #38
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Originally Posted by Ex-Calif View Post
I will always reef very early with guests on board - especially new guests. A heeled over boat as an introduction to sailing is like doing aerobatics as an introduction to flying.
My intro to flying was aerobatics in a glider. Took a mate and just before we went up we had chicken rolls. His stomach is not as strong as mine --- MESSY.

Mike
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Old 13-07-2008, 04:29   #39
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Several posters refused to take the hint: OFF TOPIC!!!

I've deleted 12 off topic posts. This is a good thread, so please stay on topic. Don't make me get out the rubber hose!
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Old 13-07-2008, 12:05   #40
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I have novice guest join me frequently, but have very few rules. I think the only true rules I have are:

1. People should try to be tidy in common areas both for the convenience of others and for safety.

2. As the captain and boat owner, I have a financial and legal opportunity that others don't have and therefore have the right of veto or to make certain decisions.

3. You don't flush anything down the head you didn't previously eat. (Actuay TP is also okay on my boat)


I also spend a lot of time educating people about sailing. Including how the head works, about seacocks, trimming sails, using the windless, etc. However, for the most part, I feel people are joining me for vacation and I want to allow them as many freedoms as possible.
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Old 27-09-2011, 00:14   #41
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Re: What rules do you have for guests aboard?

I realise this is an old thread. But will post the rules I have been working for others to find at a later stage. they are written with the novice in mind and considering that the voyage will most likely be lengthy and not a day sail. (they are still a work in progress so are in no particular order yet- i plan on breaking them into "not negotiable sailing rules" and "social rules" )

Boat Rules
These boat rules cover the practical and social rules of the boat.

The motto of the boat is. “The only dumb question is the one you don’t ask”. So curious minds are very welcome.

The skipper is responsible for the safety of the boat and all persons on board. Sadly, a nautical vessel is not a democracy; the skippers decisions regarding the boat may be discussable but not negotiable. The skipper will make decisions, keeping safety as a highest priority. This may mean changing plans to routes, changing watch times, altering crew arrangements, allocating maintenance and safety tasks, commencing safety drills and many other decisions that involve not only the safely of the boat but social harmony and victualling also.

Men, when underway, please sit down to use the head.
Ladies, sanitary items must not be flushed in the head.
Too much toilet paper can block the head. If you block the head, you will be given the plunger and tools to unblock it

We have finite supplies of water on board. We need to use it sparingly.

All crew are required to help with all aspects of running the boat. From cleaning to cooking to sailing. Watches will be allocated. We will try as much as possible to ensure that everyone gets plenty of rest and personal time.

We want a happy boat. Please discuss any problems early before niggly things grow.

Many people get seasick (yes-even the skipper). If you suffer from seasickness you will still be required to fulfil your watch times to allow others to relax and renew energy. Seasickness can make you feel quite debilitated. But we all get it and have to soldier on for the benefit of everyone. It usually only lasts a day or two. Copious amounts of alcohol the night before we sail will guarantee a very unpleasant first few days. Best have farewell parties two days prior.

Night watches, it is customary that as your watch is nearing its end, that you boil the jug and have a fresh cup of coffee/tea ready for the new watch crew. During a night watch try to keep chatter and noise to a minimum to allow those sleeping to enjoy their rest.

Man Over board procedure in brief. Shout man overboard as loud as possible to alert all crew. Throw the life bouy. Hit the MOB button the gps, have someone point continuously at the MOB. At night or dusk ,If possible, throw a water proof torch towards the mob also. Make sure it is turned on as you throw it. Return the boat to the mob and recover. If you are the MOB, swim to the life buoy, collect the torch which should be floating nearby. Shine the torch towards the boat, but not at the helmsman (you will blind him/her). Stay put, once you have the life buoy you won’t sink. Don’t waste valuable energy trying to swim to the boat. We will come to you. Keep in the foetal position if possible- to conserve heat. Ask us to provide additional drills if you are unsure of any of this.

Men Peeing overboard. The only time this is allowed is during the day in fair weather and only when another person is in the cockpit. Else it’s down to the head please boys. There have been a lot of drowned men found with their flies open. Oh and for your own sake, never pee into the wind J

One hand for you and one for the boat. This is an old saying. But it’s still very valuable. Basically, make sure you have a good hand hold at all times as you move about the boat.

Injuries-medical emergencies. Report all injuries to the skipper. And make sure they are logged with times, what happened, nature of problem, pain management, symptoms etc in case we need the information for further medial assistance.

Shore time. Aside from anchor watches, time in port is your own. We will be in cramped quarters for some time at sea and it’s often nice to spend time alone or without certain others. Please don’t be offended if another crew member/s doesn’t want you to tag along on a specific shore trip- its most likely they just want their own space for a while. And that’s ok.

Alcohol. We love our booze ups. But for the safety of everyone on board, we don’t get drunk while at sea – Ever! That’s best left to bars on shore and quiet anchorages. On this note. It is customary to always “shout back”. If another crewmember buys you a drink at the bar, you should always offer to buy them one in return. Tight asses belong on fish and not at the bar J

Drugs. No, just no. We don’t allow illegal drugs of any kind on the boat at any time. We can not risk the good reputation of others on the crew by allowing this to occur. After all, who wants to be locked up in a foreign jail. For the protection of the entire crew, anyone found bringing drugs onto the boat will be removed immediately and will have to find new accommodation and travel plans.

Meals before we sail. As mentioned seasickness can occur, reducing your hunger. We try to have lots of carb’s the day and night before a long trip to provide sustained energy.

Personal space. Each berth becomes someones temporary home. Please respect their home and their space and ask before using that space for any reason.

Electrical power. We have finite electrical power on board. Please make sure lights are turned off when not in use and electricity is used sparingly

There are many dangers on board, from being hit by the boom to sunburn to falling down a hatch to kicking your toes on deck fittings. You will be briefed on these dangers. But always keep an eye on others as they move about the boat and alert them of any possible danger you see.

Harnesses. These must be worn at all times at night and in bad weather. You must clip on prior to going forward on the deck during all night and bad weather legs.

Life jackets. The skipper may decide that life jackets must be worn for whatever reason.

Other safety equipment. They are many forms of safety equipment on board the boat. We will brief you on the location and how to use each item. If at any time you need to revise your knowledge please ask us. Remember The only dumb question is the one you don’t ask. And we would much prefer someone to say ‘ I don’t understand’ rather than not be able to use the equipment during an emergency.

Meals. When on galley duty as cook. Please make sure that everyone eats the food you are preparing. If not, it’s courteous to offer to make the person something else. Eg not everyone can eat super hot chilli’s and some people are allergic to seafood. Vegetarians, please understand that meat will be prepared and cooked on board. You may be required to cook it as a part of your time as cook.

Washing up. The cook never washes up. The wash up and tidy is to be done by the other off watch crew.
Make a mess, clean it up. I guess we don’t have to explain this one too much. But junk becomes a hazard at sea. Make sure you put things away after you have used them. This includes personal items, cups and general boat equipment.

When you are the helmsman, it’s ok to ask another crewman to get you a drink or something from the galley. It’s ok to ask someone to take over for a while, while you go to the bathroom also. Everyone understands that the position of helmsman requires concentration and you will concentrate better with a nice cool drink, a snack or an empty bladder. The main thing is to never leave the helm unmanned.

Waste. No plastics ever go overboard. Food scraps are usually ok if they are something the fish will enjoy. Mid ocean, metal cans and biodegradables like cardboard/paper can go overboard. But never near a coast and never around wildlife could that mistake the waste as food.

Smoking is ok. But only on deck and to leeward of everyone else.

Overview. We are a team of new friends on the adventure of a lifetime You’re an important part of our lives and our team. We all pull our weight and share the same tasks and duties with the goal of a safe, harmonious and enjoyable experience.

And finally, we never eat the last two chocolates without offering to share first J
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Old 27-09-2011, 00:44   #42
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Re: What rules do you have for guests aboard?

We placed a tab on our blogsite to advise visitors what to expect. This does not encompass 'rules' regarding operation of the boat when sailing because those are best discussed onboard.

http:/svbebe.blogspot.com/p/visitors-to-bebe.html

And we always reiterate to them before their visit that if they bring hard luggage then they will be sleeping with it.

Judy
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Old 27-09-2011, 00:53   #43
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Re: What rules do you have for guests aboard?

thats really great. i might have to borrow some of your ideas if you dont mind
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Old 27-09-2011, 01:00   #44
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Re: What rules do you have for guests aboard?

I forget where I saw it now..... but I love it.

" Falling overboard can ruin your day"!:-((
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Old 27-09-2011, 01:24   #45
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Re: What rules do you have for guests aboard?

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thats really great. i might have to borrow some of your ideas if you dont mind
Certainly. Copy anything you like from our website.

Judy
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