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Old 03-03-2010, 06:02   #16
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Even floating line can find its way beneath the boat to foul the prop or rudder, if you drift over it. Keep it short.

Also many boats tend to sail at anchor, so that may be a factor in how/where you tie the tender.
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Old 03-03-2010, 06:20   #17
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The only other consideration is tie forward if grilling, i.e. sparks and gas and plastic.
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Old 03-03-2010, 11:55   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blue Stocking View Post
I have a 1 1/4" telescopic alum pole, snap 1 end to a short pennant on the dinghy, other end on the reaching strut padeye, haul off the beam. Support pole with forestaysail halyard.

Very St.Tropez!!
I like the idea of the pole, Blue Stocking, its like a tow bar for a
car, much more control I would think.
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Old 03-03-2010, 12:09   #19
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I find tying my dingy up next to the boat means it will bang against it if there is any notable wind and wave action. Hanging it about 8 feet back avoids that. Hanging it back also provides something to hang onto in a current when I jump in.
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Old 04-03-2010, 07:19   #20
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Perhaps the best approach (to dinghy towing in sheltered water)

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I find tying my dingy up next to the boat means it will bang against it if there is any notable wind and wave action. Hanging it about 8 feet back avoids that. Hanging it back also provides something to hang onto in a current when I jump in.
I saw someone using a very novel approach to solve all the banging and prop fouling issues: He used two dinghy painters, one tied to each side of the transom of the sailboat, and he slipped an 8-10 foot length of schedule 40 PVC pipe over each painter. This rigid triangulation kept the dinghy well-controlled off the stern, even while docking and maneuvering, with no risks.

I'm not a proponent of dinghy towing in open water or for any great distance, but this solution is simple, cheap and clever.
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Old 05-03-2010, 12:31   #21
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We just lift it about a foot over the water on davits. However, if the dinghy sits to low and a wave goes by it makes a loud clapping sound, like a beaver slapping its tail, if the water reaches the hull/floor. When we want to use the swim platform, or have access to the stern, we just unhooked the aft snap shackle and let the dinghy drift to the side. This way everything is simple to do and you know the dinghy is safe.
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Old 05-03-2010, 12:39   #22
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For what it's worth, we've been using an old line [about 8-10mm] from a previous power boat as a painter for the tender; the "waste not want not" principle!

It doesn't work!! The line had begun to "moult" [as my friend said when I arrived at his boat] and parted, leaving the tender away with the stiff breeze!!?? In the ensuing activity, my mate's wife ended up with 5 stitches in a finger, so there's a message about stupid false economy.

The new 12mm silverline should both float AND hold for quite a while!

G'day
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Old 05-03-2010, 13:16   #23
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i saw a cool but expensive idea at west marine .. it was a 3/8" nylon line with poly core that floats but can stand up to the UV. very nice for tying a tender and staying out of props.
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