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Old 17-09-2012, 05:10   #16
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Re: Tangalooma Wrecks

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Originally Posted by Jim Cate View Post
G'Day Dozza,

Well, I guess there always has to be someone who has a different opinion!

First, the "magic" of Tangalooma is not apparent to me... it's like anchoring in a maritime junkyard IMO, but I guess beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

But, if one wants or needs to spend a night there, here's our practice: We do NOT like anchoring between the beach and the line of wrecks. It is quite narrow, often quite crowded with folks not too skilled in anchoring technique, and as mentioned by others, there is a strong tidal current sweeping through which adds to the excitement of getting well situated and staying put during the night. All in all, not our cup of tea!

So, we anchor a bit short of the wrecks. About 8-10 metres depth, clean sand bottom, and lots of room. Out there the velocity of the current is quite a bit less, but still present. I would not recommend use of the moorings scattered about, for their provenance is unknown, and their appearance suggests that they are light duty only.
Finally, despite the f/c NE winds, there is often a W'ly land breeze at night, and that can lead to some discomfort.

So, you'll have to form your own opinions after you have a go at it. Should be a good sail if the f/c holds. Are you planning to come in via the NE channel? It will save a lot of miles over using the main channel, and leads pretty directly to the Tangalooma area.

Cheers,

Jim
Dozza,Strange-""The magic of Tangalooma is not apparent its like anchoring in a maritime junkyard""Wow ,why would you anchor there then and how often do you anchor in a maritime junkyard".As far as being a crowded anchorage dont worry Dozza ,only happens when the weekend warriors turn up and the good part is the current is actually a benefit as it keeps all the boats nicely inline when the current runs.
Mate,you will probably be 1 of only 2 or 3 other boats there midweek and may even have it to yourself.The snorkling around the wrecks is chockablock full of the most amazing range of fish and you can even go down inside the wrecks and discover a family of shovel nosed sharks that you can pat.Take your camera for some great shots.All over the world artificial reefs are set up to support and sustain sealife and here in our own backyard we have this amazing place which is FREE to visit.I regulary take my passengers from all over the globe to Tangalooma for the unique snorkling experience, when the weather looks a bit iffy always hook on to a mooring ball and have always been safe and sound.
Check out the depths on your chart as the channels are marked for the huge ships and tankers and those 300 foot mothers draw a fair whack, you will probably find like me you are able to sail directly to your designated destination.Enjoy your experience there and tell everyone as we want and need lots and lots of tourists to come and enjoy as well.
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Old 17-09-2012, 05:22   #17
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Re: Tangalooma Wrecks

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My choices for the area are well away from the majority Untitled - Google Maps

One thing worth mentioning is to make sure you have good gear down, adequate swinging room and are well attached to the bottom as I have been there on several occasions when there has been lovely northerlies in the day then a big SW to W storm has howled through late at night early morning resulting in boats washed up on the beach.

Have fun.
Any strong westerly weather its not recommended as a safe anchorage.
Please post some pics. of all the boats washed up on the beach so we know what to expect.
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Old 17-09-2012, 05:26   #18
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Hi Dozza, if you are going to anchor overnight I would suggest dropping your pick just south of the resort landing barge but remember to keep a safe distance offshore, a combination of low tide and a slight westerly wind may have you bouncing off the bottom and after brekky anchoring up near he wrecks, there's a bar at the resort and you can what you want on their telly.
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Old 17-09-2012, 05:40   #19
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Re: Tangalooma Wrecks

Photos of Tangalooma wrecks https://www.google.com.au/search?q=m...w=1366&bih=614

And yes every year there are a number of boats that get stranded on the beach and a 40 foot plus ferro yacht stranded there last month. Keep the Vhf on and listen The coast guard/VMR will give a timely warning.
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Old 17-09-2012, 06:46   #20
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Re: Tangalooma Wrecks

when heading via the north west channel on an out going tide the first 500m can get ugly but other than that the channel is fine but dont stray too wide between the markers at anything below high tide. if the westerley comes in the best protection is the very north end of the island. watch the depth of water you anchor in up near the resort as the sandy bottom shifts a lot, tides are very strong. you can watch the dolphins being fed at night on the wharf
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Old 17-09-2012, 17:04   #21
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Re: Tangalooma Wrecks

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacana View Post
Dozza,Strange-""The magic of Tangalooma is not apparent its like anchoring in a maritime junkyard""Wow ,why would you anchor there then and how often do you anchor in a maritime junkyard".As far as being a crowded anchorage dont worry Dozza ,only happens when the weekend warriors turn up and the good part is the current is actually a benefit as it keeps all the boats nicely inline when the current runs.
Mate,you will probably be 1 of only 2 or 3 other boats there midweek and may even have it to yourself.The snorkling around the wrecks is chockablock full of the most amazing range of fish and you can even go down inside the wrecks and discover a family of shovel nosed sharks that you can pat.Take your camera for some great shots.All over the world artificial reefs are set up to support and sustain sealife and here in our own backyard we have this amazing place which is FREE to visit.I regulary take my passengers from all over the globe to Tangalooma for the unique snorkling experience, when the weather looks a bit iffy always hook on to a mooring ball and have always been safe and sound.
Check out the depths on your chart as the channels are marked for the huge ships and tankers and those 300 foot mothers draw a fair whack, you will probably find like me you are able to sail directly to your designated destination.Enjoy your experience there and tell everyone as we want and need lots and lots of tourists to come and enjoy as well.
G'Day Jacana,

Apparently our ideas of what constitutes a good anchorage differ somewhat. I think that a look at the pix linked by SimonV will support my description of the wrecks, but that is obviously a personal feeling and completely subjective.

But, advice to pick up an unknown mooring, especially when the weather "looks a bit iffy" is dangerous. Unless you have recently had a dive and checked the mooring from anchor to float yourself, you put your boat and self at risk doing so. Over the years that we have been cruising, we have seen far more boats come to grief when thus moored than when on their own ground tackle. In all cases of such loss, the moorings had been said to be suitable. The holding in the Tangalooma area is generally quite good, being firm sand. Why, then, would anyone not use their own tackle if caught there in a Westerly blow?

Parenthetically, if the conditions look ripe for a thunderstorm or other W'ly conditions a better idea is to seek anchorage somewhere else. Unfortunately, there are few good W'ly spots on the island side of Moreton Bay, especially ones that can be accessed in the dark. Having a "plan B" for such conditions is always a good idea.

Finally, as to your question of why we would ever anchor in or near such a junkyard... disregarding the appearance of the wrecks and the weekly mob scenes, it is a good anchorage in stable E'ly quadrant winds, and one which can safely be accessed in the dark. (For those not familiar with the area, the entrance channel through the shielding sand banks is lit with range lights). We have often used it for a rest when arriving from distant places in the dark of night.

Cheers,

Jim
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Old 17-09-2012, 18:16   #22
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Re: Tangalooma Wrecks

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Any strong westerly weather its not recommended as a safe anchorage.
Of course not but if you read my post you would see I am talking about late night storms/ early morning which I have been through several in the past.
Shrieking wind, horizontal rain all only lasts 20 minutes or so but enough to catch the unwary out.
Because of current most will have a bit of gear out and because the space is so narrow if the wind does a 180 shift and belt in you can find yourself closer to the beach than expected.
Quote:
Please post some pics. of all the boats washed up on the beach
I dont have any but it doesnt mean it doesn't happen as simon has already pointed out.
Quote:
so we know what to expect.
Um, boat on beach laying on side if mono and upright if cat or tri.
Because the storm is short lived and the banks prohibit wave build-up damage should be minimal , but inconvenient non the less.
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Old 17-09-2012, 19:49   #23
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Re: Tangalooma Wrecks

During the warmer months storms rapidly form in the west during the late afternoon. Most times you get some warnings but they have been known to pop up within an hour or so, If you are on the eastern side of the bay you need to be aware and watch the weather. Should it look iffy waves in the bay are short and sharp and up to 3M in height making the trip to the west very exciting. The Tangalooma ferry got caught out last year.

There ore three parts to the vid. The wreaks do not form a breakwall that is why I and my friends always anchor at the southern end of Tangalooma south of the Ferry wharf. And as far as Public moorings, There where none last year, only the resorts own water sports moorings
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Old 17-09-2012, 20:26   #24
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Re: Tangalooma Wrecks

If there vis any west at all in the wind then that side of moreton becomes a surf beach, so keep an eye on the weather.
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Old 24-09-2012, 21:33   #25
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Re: Tangalooma Wrecks

Well guys thanks for the interest and advice on my recent Tangalooma trip. Although we had to endure wet and to windward sailing for the first 4-5hrs we ended up with clear skies and a 5knt S/E breeze to take us through the nth east channel and a nice coastal cruise into Tangalooma. We did manage to touch bottom on the sand shoal west of the wrecks after venturing in a little close for some photo shots!! So any new comers be aware to sail clear of this and enter via the leads well south of the wrecks and past the main jetty. Although it was a mostly clear night with light winds, as mentioned by many of you, it was a rocky night with the tides keeping us abeam of the westerly swell, although slight it was enough to remind me next time to secure all rigging a little better to allow for a quieter night’s sleep!! As for the scenery of the area, we found it to be worth the trip and look forward to heading back over (midweek) for some snorkelling around the wrecks, will do as suggested by and anchor south of the main jetty next time. Can see also how it would get crowded over the holiday and weekend periods as the area isn’t that big and rather narrow. Anyway we did manage to see and experience some good “whale shows” en-route with whales breaching on a numerous occasions. The return trip to Mooloolaba was great with a constant 10 knt N/E wind which allowed for a single tack all the way back once clear of the nth east channel.
So once again thanks for all the advice and look forward to the next trip which will probably be north up to Tin Can Bay area.
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Old 25-09-2012, 01:36   #26
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Re: Tangalooma Wrecks

Hey Dozza,

Glad it went well... and don't stress about touching the sand. Happens to all of us at times. Tangalooma is actually a better anchorage when the E'ly quadrant winds are stronger because they overwhelm the tendency towards a W'ly land breeze at night... the one that kept you awake!

So, when you go to Tin Can, you may get the experience of overnighting at Double Island point. There you will likely get a refracted swell coming from abeam as you lie to the SE wind. We've had fairly good luck there with a bridle from the quarter to a point on the chain ahead of the boat, cranking her around to lie stern to the swell. Really helps!

Or, you may go all the way to cross Wide Bay Bar. Usually not a big deal,but folks manage to get into trouble there by not paying attention to the ground swell and entering on a big ebb to boot.

Lots of things to think about, but that's the joy of cruising.

Cheers,

Jim
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Old 25-09-2012, 03:00   #27
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Re: Tangalooma Wrecks

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So once again thanks for all the advice and look forward to the next trip which will probably be north up to Tin Can Bay area.
Dozza
Glad to hear you had a good time. Now getting into Tin Can Bay that can be fun and or frustrating. Wide Bay Bar is very straight forward if you follow the way points. Its about 8hrs from Maloolabar most will say "only go into the bar during the morning" but this is only because the leads are difficult to see against the setting sun, I struggle to see them no mater what time of the day. Using a chart plotter is simple but you want to be entering during the the last 1/2 of a rising tide, the closer to the top of the tide is smoother but if your run is a bit late you could be fighting the outgoing currant which can run at up to 6 knots at Inskip point. Call Tin Can VMR the day before for the latest way points, they have not changed in two years, but two years ago there was lots of drama on the bar. If seas are greater than 2metres think twice about doing it especially for your first time. You must trust your way points and don't deviate. Then again it could be a mill pond and you will wonder what all the fuss was about.....until.
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Old 20-10-2012, 07:57   #28
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Re: Tangalooma Wrecks

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Glad to hear you had a good time. Now getting into Tin Can Bay that can be fun and or frustrating. .
Thanks for the info Simon, much appreciated.

Regards

Dozza
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