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Old 24-08-2017, 21:53   #16
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Re: Storm boards for windows

When commercial fishing, many of us carried precut plywood to replace blown out windows. Others put plexiglass over the built in windows. Usually with a piece of thick rubber in the center to keep the plexiglass from cracking. Another method is a board across the inside with a rubber cushion in the center to support the glass.
Double or triple thick glass also works.
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Old 24-08-2017, 22:51   #17
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Re: Storm boards for windows

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Originally Posted by DeepFrz View Post
I think that Lexan installed before any large passage is probably the best idea. That way you could pre-install mounting pads for machine screws.

Are you going to cover your hatches as well?


My sister and husband sailed around the globe in the 70's on an old woody Lapworth 36. They did exactly as Deepfiz suggested. Using bronze mounting pads countersunk and glued into the cabin sides that were tapped. Heavy lexan windows were then thru bolted to these bronze pads before they departed on any passages. There was a gap if i remember correctly of 3/8" between lexan and the cabin side. Once they arrived and island bound for any length of time they were removed and stowed.

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Old 25-08-2017, 04:10   #18
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Re: Storm boards for windows

Why not double the thickness of the existing windows and figure out the details to make that a workable solution before heading out? Then the last moment install is no longer an issue
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Old 25-08-2017, 10:25   #19
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Re: Storm boards for windows

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Why not double the thickness of the existing windows and figure out the details to make that a workable solution before heading out? Then the last moment install is no longer an issue
This would be ideal, but isn't really an option where I am. I would first have to source the polycarbonate on the island, which would cost a fortune, and then find someone that would be able to cut it to spec. Then there's the whole issue of drilling 60 holes in the boat to mount new oversized windows.

Wood, on the other hand, is easy to source, cheap, and easy to cut.
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Old 25-08-2017, 10:39   #20
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Re: Storm boards for windows

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This would be ideal, but isn't really an option where I am. I would first have to source the polycarbonate on the island, which would cost a fortune, and then find someone that would be able to cut it to spec. Then there's the whole issue of drilling 60 holes in the boat to mount new oversized windows.

Wood, on the other hand, is easy to source, cheap, and easy to cut.
There is an option to use wood for storm boards although it blocks out all view from inside the cabin. Then when you get to a part of the world where you can get access to transparent material that is appropriate you can discard the wood or put it to a different use.
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Old 27-08-2017, 22:05   #21
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Re: Storm boards for windows

I carried fully shaped & prepared storm boards for 8 years, & 53,000 miles around the pacific.
There were only 2 occasions when I considered fitting them, both in cyclones. In both these instances where I was prepared to perhaps damage my lovely varnished Honduras Mahogany fitting the things it was already too late to handle them on deck in the wind & seaway.


I agree with whoever said they must go on before the start of the passage, & stay in place. Might as well simply fit stronger windows permanently before you start.
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Old 28-08-2017, 02:57   #22
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Re: Storm boards for windows

Presumably the OP's glass was designed for offshore wave pressure and designed for seeing through or providing light. Why cover it with timber if its not broken?
If broken by a halyard or safety harness shackle just nail your board over it. Fix the nail holes when you replace the glass.
If your windows are inadequate for wave pressure then maybe your cabin top isn't either.
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Old 25-11-2017, 11:24   #23
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Re: Storm boards for windows

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Presumably the OP's glass was designed for offshore wave pressure and designed for seeing through or providing light. Why cover it with timber if its not broken?
If broken by a halyard or safety harness shackle just nail your board over it. Fix the nail holes when you replace the glass.
If your windows are inadequate for wave pressure then maybe your cabin top isn't either.
I'm reviving this post as it'll be something I'll finally be addressing.

The Vega's windows are designed smaller than the hole they occupy, and are held in place with rubber gaskets much like old car windows. The glass is plenty strong, but there are several famous incidents of the windows being blown in from large waves. Vegas also don't have a lot of freeboard and, at least in my experience, tend to be wet.

I think I have settled on the idea of having lexan/polycarbonate sheets in place before any long passage. I'll install two teak strips bolted through the hull and sealed with 4200 or sikafelx above and below the two large windows. I'll then bolt polycarbonate sheets onto these strips of teak when needed.

What would be the best way to capture the bolts in the teak? If possible, I'd like a solution where repeatedly removing and installing the bolts wouldn't lead to the holes eventually becoming unusable.
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Old 26-11-2017, 01:32   #24
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Re: Storm boards for windows

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Originally Posted by Ryban View Post
I'm reviving this post as it'll be something I'll finally be addressing.

The Vega's windows are designed smaller than the hole they occupy, and are held in place with rubber gaskets much like old car windows. The glass is plenty strong, but there are several famous incidents of the windows being blown in from large waves. Vegas also don't have a lot of freeboard and, at least in my experience, tend to be wet.

I think I have settled on the idea of having lexan/polycarbonate sheets in place before any long passage. I'll install two teak strips bolted through the hull and sealed with 4200 or sikafelx above and below the two large windows. I'll then bolt polycarbonate sheets onto these strips of teak when needed.

What would be the best way to capture the bolts in the teak? If possible, I'd like a solution where repeatedly removing and installing the bolts wouldn't lead to the holes eventually becoming unusable.
Why not just make your windows as strong as the cabin sides? Remove the old windows and make new, larger ones bolted through the cabin sides. It seems it would be less work in the long run than making up lexan storm shutters with all the necessary mounting hardware. You should be able to find 1cm thick plexiglass (cast, not extruded) just about anywhere (sign shops, for example). You can through-bolt them. For extra strength, you can add a stainless steel or even wood trim inside to spread the loads. This way you don't have to worry about putting storm boards in before bad weather- they're always in place! Mounted with good quality butyl tape you have strong, leak-free windows that will last for years.
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Old 26-11-2017, 02:04   #25
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Re: Storm boards for windows

Quote:
... What would be the best way to capture the bolts in the teak? If possible, I'd like a solution where repeatedly removing and installing the bolts wouldn't lead to the holes eventually becoming unusable.
Threaded inserts?

https://tappex.co.uk/threaded-insert...and-composites
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Old 26-11-2017, 04:20   #26
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Re: Storm boards for windows

I personally think it makes more sense to have emergency boards that you can fit if necessary rather than boards that you rig proactively. Mine are set up with bolts, battens and thumb screws, one that fits the port lights (which have 3/8" tempered glass) and one that fits hatches.

I agree that as noted, anything that is easy for you to rig in advance of heavy weather is likely to be less secure than an emergency version.
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Old 26-11-2017, 05:15   #27
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Re: Storm boards for windows

My windows leak a bit, and that combined with the need for strong windows had me considering replacing them with oversized polycarbonate.

However, I don't like this idea for mostly aesthetic reasons. The boat lives in the tropics, and the plastic is bound to degrade, haze, and scratch.

Instead, I'm going to fix the leaky windows with new seals, and proceed with the teak strips that will hold a piece of oversized polycarbonate just off the windows so a gap exists between the two for air flow.

Instead of bolting the polycarbonate onto the teak strips, would a routed grove, with bolts inserted on the ends to keep the window from sliding out, be sufficiently strong?
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Old 26-11-2017, 06:27   #28
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Re: Storm boards for windows

A routed groove is good. An Aluminum grooved window section is better.
Seriously consider Polycarbonate oversized external surface fit, on butyl tape, with holes 5% bigger than the countersunk machine screws.
The outer surface can be framed with long life vinyl tape, which adds to the waterproofing.
Polycarbonate does scratch more easily than acrylic, but it is tougher, by a long way. If it is easy to scratch, its easy to polish out.
Gilana's portlights are 1/2" lexan in Bronze frames, according to Lloyds 100/A/1 there is a cast Aluminum storm deadlight hinged on the inside, personally I think the Lexan (Polycarbonate) is stronger than the deadlight.

Look at some modern catamarans to see how nice a surface mounted window can look.
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Old 26-11-2017, 06:38   #29
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Re: Storm boards for windows

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ryban View Post
My windows leak a bit, and that combined with the need for strong windows had me considering replacing them with oversized polycarbonate.

However, I don't like this idea for mostly aesthetic reasons. The boat lives in the tropics, and the plastic is bound to degrade, haze, and scratch.

Instead, I'm going to fix the leaky windows with new seals, and proceed with the teak strips that will hold a piece of oversized polycarbonate just off the windows so a gap exists between the two for air flow.

Instead of bolting the polycarbonate onto the teak strips, would a routed grove, with bolts inserted on the ends to keep the window from sliding out, be sufficiently strong?
LEXAN hazes and scratches far more easily than polycarbonate/acrlic
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Old 26-11-2017, 08:58   #30
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Re: Storm boards for windows

lexan/polycarbonate/plexiglass make better portlights than do wood. stronger and you can see thru it, which can be important.
a beautiful world cruiser named kattegat has mounted his as an outer portlight protector for constant use with 4 thru bolts and caulk, and cleans em every year. he has huge portlights ..can be considered windows. the permanent mounting makes for ease in seas--no last minute prep in heavy swells or changing weather.
it is best to prep all before departure a s weather changes.
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