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Old 13-03-2016, 14:14   #106
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Re: Solo cruising vs crew cruising

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Originally Posted by barnakiel View Post
I am not sure which Ohlson was discussed but I know that the 38 is 37. / This boat has plenty of shortcomings and so if I were given one I would likely keep it, adjust it and sail it happily ever after.
The 29.

Not as rare here as they are in the US, but not very well known.
The Ohlson 29 later became the Winga 29, which is better known.

I would have liked a free one even better then the one I bought too
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Old 13-03-2016, 14:54   #107
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Re: Solo cruising vs crew cruising

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Yeah, I need just a few more ft for a better galley - 32' would have been *perfect*
Yep. Optimum size for me has always been a 32ft boat. Max 35ft, min 28ft.

So I am ending up with a 34ft boat (after too many failures trying to get a 32ft boat).

10ft beam, 5.3 tonne displacement, Bal/Disp: 40.68% (so roomy enough and comfy enough, 5.25' draft so tracks nice enough). 7/8" hull thickness I like lots too.

PS. I've had to do the food with long galleys and U galleys, and I'm quite happy with both (even when it's rough). I wouldn't let one or the other put me off a good boat.
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Old 13-03-2016, 14:56   #108
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Re: Solo cruising vs crew cruising

There are more solo sailors than one might think.
Although most people sail with other people aboard, in a lot of cases they are essentially single handing the boat.
Nearly 70% of the time I am sailing it is with no one else aboard. The 30% of the time that there are other people aboard I don't really consider them to be crew since very few of them know all that much about sailing. Most of the time they are more what I would consider to be welcome guests along for the ride.
To be honest, I actually find it easier and less work to sail with no one aboard. It may not always be as much fun, but it is certainly less complicated when not having to explain everything as you go and step over people lounging about the cockpit.
I find that, for me, boats in the 32-35 foot range make the most sense given that boats of that size are easily handled by one person in almost all conditions and also because slips, boat parts, and maintenance cost substantially less than for boats in the 40+ foot range.
Another important aspect is being independent and not at the mercy of finding crew. I think that it is important to be proficient and comfortable sailing your boat solo, whatever size it ends up being, whether or not you plan to be a "solo sailor".
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Old 13-03-2016, 15:15   #109
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Re: Solo cruising vs crew cruising

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Originally Posted by Lizzy Belle View Post
The 29.

Not as rare here as they are in the US, but not very well known.
The Ohlson 29 later became the Winga 29, which is better known.

I would have liked a free one even better then the one I bought too
OK. 38 is a different beast then. I think about twice as big. Sort of like more of an 'old timer' too. Still, a killing weapon in the right hands. I at times find them 'dirt' cheap and so I may as well end up ohlsoned up one day.

b.
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Old 13-03-2016, 15:26   #110
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Re: Solo cruising vs crew cruising

I think LOA is irrelevant. Sure, small boats are too small (zero comfort and only marginal safety). Sure very big boats are too big. Just too big.

Minis are 6.5 and I would not really like a boat smaller than that.

I have sailed boats 54' long that were very easy for one and other boats that were only 35' and were actually at the edge of my physical abilities.

A Class 40 boat is way easier to sail than most 35'ers built in the 70'ies and 80'ies. Of course a 40' will be more expensive one in the marina!

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Old 13-03-2016, 15:34   #111
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Re: Solo cruising vs crew cruising

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If you're sure that's what you want, there are boats that have a galley like that.
Lot's of fun to use when seas are rough

Personally, I think that galley design was made with marinas in mind. But I am sure others will feel otherwise

My galley may be small, but at least I can actually cook something when the boat is rockin' & rollin'. Have never even used the strap-thingy to keep myself in place (yet).

I think you mean a dinette seat?
Mine is a 'u' shaped tight gally with the sink in the middle of the boat. I dont have a strap and dont need one. Next year im going to redesign my gally (as a good gally is a high priority me thinks) but ill be keeping the same basic shape.

Ive visited on a couple of boats with long gallys and each time the owners tell me they dont cook at all when under way. One said he hove too in order to make samdwitches and a pot of coffee on a crossing seriously, hoving too in order to eat
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Old 13-03-2016, 16:54   #112
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Re: Solo cruising vs crew cruising

Actually all along kitchen is OK offshore. What is not OK is when there is no slanted piece of the floor just before the counter - the idiot designer assumed boats all sail flat or heeled to the side opposite to the galley only.

Things one discovers sailing 28 days on the wrong (galley-wise) tack.

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Old 13-03-2016, 16:58   #113
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Re: Solo cruising vs crew cruising

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Originally Posted by barnakiel View Post
Actually all along kitchen is OK offshore. What is not OK is when there is no slanted piece of the floor just before the counter - the idiot designer assumed boats all sail flat or heeled to the side opposite to the galley only.

Things one discovers sailing 28 days on the wrong (galley-wise) tack.

b.
Well, OBVIOUSLY the designer intended the boat to be sailed the OTHER way around the world. You must have been going the wrong way.
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Old 13-03-2016, 17:11   #114
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Solo cruising vs crew cruising

In addition to the things listed above by other posters, I have a full enclosure on our 2003 Hunter 356. It gets cold out on the water even in south Florida. I've had plenty of cruises in other people's boats with Dodgers and weather gear">foul weather gear and multiple crew. With two in the cockpit on watch at night, in rain and in superb foul weather gear, your watch is very compromised and you can freeze your butt off.

In my full enclosure, I stay dry and warm. In 4'degree outside temps with the sun shinning it stays around 55 degrees inside. In warmer temps I open the side panels and just close the ones that keep spray out. No spray and I keep comfortable, am rested and not compromised. On crossings with my wife, she tolerates it too and alternates between the cockpit and the salon. She reads a lot of kindle books.

We have a KVH tracking antenna with Dish network and she stays tuned into her shows she likes. We watched the Tennessee Alabama football game offshore in 3-4 foot seas? The weather channel is available on Dish and is great for keeping up with the big picture. I use Sailflow for my primary cruising weather. I have a Globalstar 1700 sat phone and a Redport optimizer and XGate which connects all my internet devices to the system. I can send and receive emails as well as make calls.. I can download grib files for Raytech and my INavX app.

I do daylight hours mostly myself, but if I need a short nap or relief my wife stands watch. At night, I usually get a couple of 3-4 hour shifts off for sleep. I set my autopilot waypoints about 4 hours apart and she stands watch. Anything spotted or something happens and she wakes me until it is resolved. The waypoint arrival alarm is my que to get up and relieve her. I have the radar, a strong Raymarine 6000 below decks autopilot , AIS and I run my generator and water to air heat pump when not at the dock and carry lots of extra fuel. With this schedule we both stay rested and it is no more than a regular day schedule like on land with the exception of our night watches.

I have full heavy foul weather gear for both of us in case the enclosure gets torn away for some reason, but just dress in nylon hiking pants, a fleece pullover and a high tech ultralight jacket and Goretex shell and Goretex gloves when needed. I wear tennis shoes but have waterproof boots if needed. I can freely move around, unrestricted by the heavy clothing and can go below with dry gear. All my controls are in the cockpit and I have a roller furling main and jib. Chartplotter is an older color Pathfinder plus system at the helm with radar and sonar. No saltwater in the cockpit means it is dry and not slick. I sit on cockpit cushions and use the West Marine folding cockpit seats with a back. Cockpit comfort is very important to staying alert.

When I get chilled, I just go down below and take a look around in the cockpit every 15 minutes. I fix coffee in my microwave using the tea bag Folgers and have a self sealing legible plastic suction lid that keeps it from slashing out of the mug going around in the microwave for 2-1/2 minutes. I can also stand in the companionway, doors closed with the slider close to my chest and the gear rises and keeps me warm when I want to watch full time. My IPad displays AIS on INavX. My computer running RayTech I can connect to using TeamViewer and display my computer screen on my other IPad, both sitting on the slider in front if me. I can maneuver using my wireless autopilot remote. For me and my wife, I have the perfect setup. Our longest crossing has been 50 hours and we arrived rested and the most comfortable I have been when I have had 3 other crew and two on watch behind a dodger, on 4 hour shifts.

You don't have to have all this stuff and it does complicate your life to some extent, but my 5 kW Northern Lights generator only burns .25 gallons per hour, so 50 hours takes about 12-13 gallons, 3 jerry cans of diesel, or if only sailing, my 38 gallon tank handles it just fine.


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Old 13-03-2016, 17:14   #115
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Re: Solo cruising vs crew cruising

That's a sweet layout Barnakiel. Is that a Beanateu? I used to think those boats were crap back in the day. Now I'm not so sure, they look like the racing yachts in the Volvo Transatlantic.

Lizzy, are boats like these easily insurable?

How can you say navigation desks aren't useful? Are the electronics soooo reliable?
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Old 13-03-2016, 17:23   #116
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Re: Solo cruising vs crew cruising

J Clark, have you considered replacing water tanks with fuel tanks? Sounds like your power consumption is up there. Are water makers efficient and reliable enough to consider going without water tanks?
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Old 13-03-2016, 18:04   #117
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Re: Solo cruising vs crew cruising

Simple- find a fiber glass mono hull built between 1976 to 1984 ish, (way overbuilt hand laid mat and glass), with 100% to 80% full keel and integral rudder. Make sure she has good lines, ie. not to beamy to far forward. My first choice would be a Freya, but the Perry yachts fill the bill as well.

Then rig her for single handed sailing; such as run mainsle' halyard and all reefing lines to the cockpit, install a self steering wind vane and a magnetic auto pilot, I suggest Simrad, and a powerful anchor winch, I suggest a Lighthouse winch.

There are many other tips a well, but this will get you on the right track.

Pic attached of my Freya.

Smooth sailing,
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Old 13-03-2016, 18:15   #118
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Re: Solo cruising vs crew cruising

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Originally Posted by Deep Blue Blues View Post
Lizzy, are boats like these easily insurable?
Took me all but 5 mins to fill out the forms online, but I'm in the Netherlands so no guarantees for the US
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Old 13-03-2016, 20:03   #119
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Solo cruising vs crew cruising

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J Clark, have you considered replacing water tanks with fuel tanks? Sounds like your power consumption is up there. Are water makers efficient and reliable enough to consider going without water tanks?

No. I've got 80 gallons of water and that lasts us 4 to 5 days, plus you can sail without fuel, but even if I had a water maker I would keep the water tanks full. You can't live without water. I've considered a CruiseRO unit, but water just hasn't been hard to get where we go and since most all our time is on KY Lake on weekends, can't justify the use there and it would be more of a hassle to pickle and winterize than I can currently justify. I do use a Safe H20 filter just after my tank that filters at 1 micron, 5 micron with charcoal and then passes through a UV light. W use boat water for drinking, cooking showering. I may decide one day to spend the month to get there and 4 months in Fla and month to get back, so I'm 6 months both places and then I might get one. They work in fresh, brackish or salt water by regulating the pressure. I only have room for the shorter 30 inch filters, not the 40, but that would still give me about a two hour run every other day.

When going to and from KY Lake to Punta Gorda we only take 10 days to Mobile to get the mast back up. We stay in Marinas for 6 and anchor out 3, last day at Turner makes 7 marinas. We refueled three times and only used the rail tanks from Demoplis to Mobile and across the Gulf. We take the GICW from Mobile to Pensacola. On the trip down we hopped to Homeport, Al, Destin and Panama City (refueled here) before crossing Gulf to Clearwater (refueled here) in 36 hours and the GICW to Punta Gorda with Gulfport and Venice at marinas. My fuel consumption on the Tenn-Tom was 108 gallons down 132 gallons back ( was flooding and fought current and took an extra day in 2014). My total down to Punta Gorda was 218 gallons. I carry 5 jerry cans and use a shaker siphon to transfer. Can transfer 5 gallons in 1'minute, 40 seconds with no mess. I have 38 gallon tank and 25 on the rail, total 63 gallons and never came close to running out of fuel. I used a total of 518 gallons for the entire trip. Coming back was up the GICW to Venice, Gulfport, Clearwater. 0n return we crossed in 50 hours from Clearwater to Homeport Marina via Pensacola Pass, then on to Turner at Mobile to get the mast taken down for the Tenn-Tom North to KY Lake. Used 50 gallons motor sailing on the last crossing, so was about a gallon an hour for both. Our normal fuel burn in Kentucky Lake, not as nearly loaded with fuel, clothes and food is an average of .64 gallons per hour with .41 gph for the 3GM 30F and .25 for the 5 KW. Our trip average was .8295 gallons per hour, including the generator. Our highest was 1.13 gph on the longest crossing where the wind was on the nose for a lot of the offshore leg. Our first 36 hour crossing was .92. Moto sailing we average 6 knots in the ocean and typically 6.2 in the GICW and in the river.

I take the jerry cans back home when not cruising.

Pictures are: Transferring 5 gallons of fuel, Retrieving in the Gulf, Jerry cans secured by straps on a treated wood and painted board unbolted to two stantions.



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Old 13-03-2016, 20:29   #120
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Re: Solo cruising vs crew cruising

I'm not too sure about drinking local water in ports abroad. I'm definitely going to have a water maker. Just not sure about reliability on them yet. Seems like some boats carry huge reserves while others don't. I wonder why.
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