Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 11-04-2008, 15:49   #1
cruiser

Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 4,525
Single Handed Chute Help?

Ok, one of my to-do's today was to have a good look at my old, stained chute and see if I could get it running for slow downwind conditions on this delivery.

I pulled the bag labeled "Chute" out and there is that stinky, stained mess... but wait!! No... that's just the sock thing! MY GOD! Inside is an all but unused spinnaker, in black. No clue what graphics or colors aside from that are.

So great!

But I'm singlehanding right now. I have no Autohelm. I haven't flown a spinnaker in years, and when I did as a kid, I was a bit foggy on it. Since I haven't been fortunate enough to own proper downwind sails before this, I have little experience.

So how do I go about doing this safely without ruining my sail or causing a dangerous situation, singlehanded?

My spinnaker seems to be a standard, old school symmetrical one, and I have a pole.

For safety (and simplicity while single handing), I'd like to really use the spinnaker when on runs only.

Can I rig it by tying it off to a couple of cleats I have that are approx 2 inches from the front of my boat? Normally I use these cleats to rig a snubber to anchor. They are on the far port and far starboard side of this catamaran.

I had heard you could fly downwind sails like this on catamarans without needing to break out the pole. Any good? Any tips, ideas, etc?

I feel like a guy trying to pack a parachute so I don't die on my next jump. So many lines... plus that block that I assume hooks to the halyard. Going out to have another look right now, but any tips for a guy who is more than rusty on proper downwind sails?

PS: Looks like I'll have good wind over the next half-week, so I won't be flying it just yet. I'm trying to prepare for some slow run that should happen eventually.
__________________

__________________
ssullivan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2008, 16:50   #2
Senior Cruiser

Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 2,453
If it were an Asymetrical, I would think it would be feasible singlehanded. But a full blown Spinnacker? Pretty chancy Sean, especially without an autopilot.
__________________

__________________
S/V Elusive is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2008, 17:19   #3
Registered User
 
cat man do's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Brisbane Australia [until the boats launched]
Boat: 50ft powercat, light,long and low powered
Posts: 4,409
Images: 36
I used to ONLY run symetricals on my last cat and yes, if you have a stand up block mounted on each bow you can pull the tack out to that bow and cleat off and raise the sock, then pop the kite without the use of a pole.

Having 2 tack lines (one throgh each block) and 2 clew line it was relatively easy to slow gybe single handed as well.

I used this setup (before getting a fixed prodder) for quite a while with great success.

I also used it for many many thousands of miles, all single handed, while leaving the main in its boom bag and underboom shade tarp up.

This way you just have to worry about the kite, you dont have the main blanketing the kite, and in my case , the main was a lot more expensive than the kite, so saved on wear an tear to the main.

Saying all this though I did use the main as well in light air, but found when the wind got above 10 knots that the kite pulled just as fast by itself with a lot less work for me (one sail)

I did have an autoplilot as well.

Dave
__________________
"Money can't buy you happiness but it can buy you a yacht large enough to pull up right alongside it"...............David Lee Roth
Long Distance Motorboat Cruising It Is Possible on a Small Budget
cat man do is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2008, 17:57   #4
cruiser

Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 4,525
Yes, Dave.

This is exactly what I was thinking of doing. For mostly dead downwind runs, I was thinking of rigging as you suggest and just keeping the main under its sailcover, stowed away and genoa furled up.

I figured running just the chute by itself is no more difficult (maybe less so?) than running wing and wing and possibly safer.

SV Elusive: I did mean just running the spinnaker by itself, no other sails. I don't think I could run a full contingent of sails with it and be safe/sane.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cat man do View Post
I used to ONLY run symetricals on my last cat and yes, if you have a stand up block mounted on each bow you can pull the tack out to that bow and cleat off and raise the sock, then pop the kite without the use of a pole.

Having 2 tack lines (one throgh each block) and 2 clew line it was relatively easy to slow gybe single handed as well.

I used this setup (before getting a fixed prodder) for quite a while with great success.

I also used it for many many thousands of miles, all single handed, while leaving the main in its boom bag and underboom shade tarp up.

This way you just have to worry about the kite, you dont have the main blanketing the kite, and in my case , the main was a lot more expensive than the kite, so saved on wear an tear to the main.

Saying all this though I did use the main as well in light air, but found when the wind got above 10 knots that the kite pulled just as fast by itself with a lot less work for me (one sail)

I did have an autoplilot as well.

Dave
__________________
ssullivan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2008, 23:00   #5
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 104
Hi, I use a symmetrical spinnaker on my PDQ, singlehanded all the time. I keep the tack and sheet rigged all the time, so it's not too much to set up. A pole is not needed on a cat.
An autopilot is absolutely nessesary if you are solo, and it handles a symmetrical chute with ease. Since there is no pole involved, the sail is pretty much self tending, and jibing is an easy slow motion affair.
I've sailed in 18kts true wind up Delaware Bay last summer from Cape May to the C&D almost the entire way under the spin. and A/P. The only problem is that I think I should be going faster, but other than that it's really a cinch to to fly.

Marc
__________________
marc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2008, 05:10   #6
Senior Cruiser
 
44'cruisingcat's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 7,450
Images: 69
I think you need to get either an autopilot or another crewmember before you should try the spinnaker.
__________________
44'cruisingcat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2008, 05:25   #7
cruiser

Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 4,525
Quote:
Originally Posted by 44'cruisingcat View Post
I think you need to get either an autopilot or another crewmember before you should try the spinnaker.
Aww.... no fun.

I would really like the autopilot for this, but is there really any harm in flying it on a slow (5-10 knots) downwind day?

I do have a sock/turtle for it, so dousing it should be a snap.
__________________
ssullivan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2008, 05:27   #8
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,413
I use a sock with an asym and have an autopilot. I can't see how you can fly a shut singlehanded in anything less than mild faily steady conditions.
__________________
Sandero is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2008, 05:38   #9
cruiser

Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 4,525
Quote:
Originally Posted by defjef View Post
I use a sock with an asym and have an autopilot. I can't see how you can fly a shut singlehanded in anything less than mild faily steady conditions.
Exactly. I don't play on flying it in anything too tricky. Mostly I wanted to use it for those times when the alternative would be wing on(and) wing, downwind, going nowhere. You know those times... the boat is rolling, you're making little headway and you just want to get some additional sail area up to speed things up a bit?

I would be flying it by itself (no main) just to get more sail area presented to the frustratingly light winds on this type of day.

Remember... no pole to deal with, so the sheet and guy are both run to either side of my deck. With a sock/turtle to snuff the thing, I'm not sure how I could get into much trouble.

BTW: I have the Dutchman system on my main. It's not so common, but I remember you saying you had it. I think I like it a lot. So far, it has been nothing but simple and easy. What I like is that if you take down the main in a pinch, you don't need to get sail ties up immediately to maintain visibility.
__________________
ssullivan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2008, 05:47   #10
CF Adviser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Wherever our boat is; Playa Zaragoza, Isla Margarita
Boat: 1994 Solaris Sunstream 40
Posts: 2,439
If you have some open water and light to moderately light air, I would say go for it. Really, flying a symmetrical chute on a cat is incredibly easy. You will need standing blocks near the bows (as Dave points out). Run guys through both blocks and cleat off the windward guy, leaving the leeward one loose. Have your sheets run well aft (and of course outside all standing rigging) to blocks and in this case, cleat off the leeward sheet, leaving the windward running loose. Attach the halyard, raise the chute and then raise the sock, trim the leeward sheet and voila!

As Dave mentions, without a pole (and with both guys at the ready), jibing is incredibly easy. The only concern (especially when singlehanding) would be spinnaker wrap around the forestay - I might leave jibing to another day (when crewed) for your first attempt. And to avoid collapsing (and again potentially wrapping) the chute, I would avoid running dead downwind. Your solid fordeck should make setting and dowsing the chute particularly safe and simple.

Brad

Brad
__________________
Southern Star is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2008, 05:53   #11
Registered User
 
cat man do's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Brisbane Australia [until the boats launched]
Boat: 50ft powercat, light,long and low powered
Posts: 4,409
Images: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by defjef View Post
I use a sock with an asym and have an autopilot. I can't see how you can fly a shut singlehanded in anything less than mild faily steady conditions.
Thats mono hulls for ya

Most cats track well (like on rails) and dont roll

Dave
__________________
"Money can't buy you happiness but it can buy you a yacht large enough to pull up right alongside it"...............David Lee Roth
Long Distance Motorboat Cruising It Is Possible on a Small Budget
cat man do is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2008, 05:58   #12
Registered User
 
swagman's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Winter land based UK New Forest. Summer months away. Making the transition from sail to power this year - scary stuff.
Boat: Super Van Craft 1320 Power Yacht
Posts: 2,175
Images: 10
Send a message via Skype™ to swagman
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssullivan View Post

So how do I go about doing this safely without ruining my sail or causing a dangerous situation, singlehanded?
You can't.

S*ds law says the light wind will build the very minute it gets hoisted and letting go the brace / sheet whilst also pulling down the sock is about as easy as hauling down the socked item whilst easing the halyard. Asking for trouble IMHO.

JOHN
__________________
Don't take life too seriously. No ones going to make it out alive......Go see our blog at http://www.sailblogs.com/member/yachtswagman/
swagman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2008, 06:26   #13
Registered User
 
cat man do's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Brisbane Australia [until the boats launched]
Boat: 50ft powercat, light,long and low powered
Posts: 4,409
Images: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssullivan View Post

BTW: I have the Dutchman system on my main. It's not so common, .
Why is it that Dutchman (lazyjacks) are so uncommon over there?

At the end of the day its just a bit of rope , some blocks and some horn cleats.

This is how I did mine on a rotating mast.

On the spreader pic you can see that it was loose peice of VB cord running through the jumper and spreader blocks.

In real life the blocks stayed where they were in relation to everything and as the mast rotated the VB cord slid through the blocks.

Adjustment to boom height when dropping main was by untying rope from horn cleat (small 2" Ronstan) lift boom re-tie.

Fire halyard, main drops flaked in bag, big plastic zip done up and Rum o'clock all in about 1 minute.

A mistake in the drawing, I had a boom bag that I had made at a tarpaulin manufacturer (way cheaper than sailmaker, cost less than $200) and the cheek blocks were attached to the top batten.

You can get an idea of the boom bag in the pics

Dave
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	lazy jacks.JPG
Views:	2589
Size:	86.8 KB
ID:	3259   Click image for larger version

Name:	scan0012 (Large).jpg
Views:	193
Size:	130.2 KB
ID:	3260  

Click image for larger version

Name:	027_27 (Large).JPG
Views:	214
Size:	115.3 KB
ID:	3261  
__________________
"Money can't buy you happiness but it can buy you a yacht large enough to pull up right alongside it"...............David Lee Roth
Long Distance Motorboat Cruising It Is Possible on a Small Budget
cat man do is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2008, 06:33   #14
Registered User
 
cat man do's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Brisbane Australia [until the boats launched]
Boat: 50ft powercat, light,long and low powered
Posts: 4,409
Images: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by swagman View Post
You can't.


JOHN
Well you can with a bit of experience and the right setup

Little girls manage to sail 60 ft Tri's around the world single handed using kites.

I had mine up regularly in 15+ knots single handed occasionaly over and it was fine (but very fast) 19 knots of boatspeed comming into Cairns on the surf on one trip.

This boat tracked very well.

Dave
__________________
"Money can't buy you happiness but it can buy you a yacht large enough to pull up right alongside it"...............David Lee Roth
Long Distance Motorboat Cruising It Is Possible on a Small Budget
cat man do is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2008, 08:45   #15
Registered User
 
Tnflakbait's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Southern California
Boat: CSK, 33' Aita Pe'ape'a
Posts: 338
Images: 7
Sure you can do it, The most helpful peice of equipment will be a autopilot, but it is not neccesary. You may be able to lock the helm off for enough time to set the chute.

Don' use a pole. Experiment at the slip, that way it will get up faster when you run up to the foredeck. This ain't rocket science. Don't listen to anyone that tells you it can't be done solo. Just make sure to try it first in VERY light winds. Then go from there.
__________________

__________________
Tnflakbait is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
singlehanding

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Single-handed Docking Procedures sneuman Seamanship & Boat Handling 95 24-06-2013 17:59
Sailing spinnakers single-handed Stede General Sailing Forum 2 30-05-2008 22:26
Single handed mast climb system malikalalu Deck hardware: Rigging, Sails & Hoisting 14 28-02-2008 17:35
Asymmetrical Chute Gear for Cat sailvi767 Multihull Sailboats 7 15-09-2007 00:39
Asymetrical Chute Charlie General Sailing Forum 0 12-04-2006 08:27



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 21:46.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.