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Old 12-08-2013, 13:27   #1
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Seaworthy

Hi. I'm new around here - doing some research while I save up for my boat. I've read alot of threads and I've noticed comments by some posters about how it could take alot of time and work to get a boat seaworthy for a long cruise.

So let's say I'm boat shopping - hoping to find a 38-40' in the 40-50k range - and I find the right boat at the right price. Everything is fairly up to date on it, and its had regular maintenance done. The seller assures me that its ready to sail. I have it inspected independently and the inspector concurs that the boat is ready to go.

What kind of "things" would I expect to need to do in order to make the boat seaworthy? Wouldn't it just be ready to cruise?
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Old 12-08-2013, 13:46   #2
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pirate Re: Seaworthy

Ready to cruise is seaworthy... if everything works and water stays on the outside...
Others may disagree...
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Old 12-08-2013, 13:47   #3
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Would depend on the boat. Best bet would be to research a particularl boat you are interested in. Lots of magazine reviews of older boats can be found online, and of course you can ask for pros and cons on here of a specific boat.
Your question is slightly naive so expect to be bashed a bit.
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Old 12-08-2013, 13:48   #4
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Re: Seaworthy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lonestaralaskan View Post
Hi. I'm new around here - doing some research while I save up for my boat. I've read alot of threads and I've noticed comments by some posters about how it could take alot of time and work to get a boat seaworthy for a long cruise.

So let's say I'm boat shopping - hoping to find a 38-40' in the 40-50k range - and I find the right boat at the right price. Everything is fairly up to date on it, and its had regular maintenance done. The seller assures me that its ready to sail. I have it inspected independently and the inspector concurs that the boat is ready to go.

What kind of "things" would I expect to need to do in order to make the boat seaworthy? Wouldn't it just be ready to cruise?
I'd suggest you buy something a little cheaper that will teach you everything you need to know about a boat that's " ready" to cruise. Or go and look at tons of those ready to cruise boats then you will start to understand a part of it.

You got lots to learn. There are several books out there though about how to buy an older boat. I still think it's best to learn while doing.

Example: I bought an old boat for $2,000 which was probably worth $6,000. (maybe) I have $8,000 in it now and have done no structural repairs. This was just for bottom paint, an old diesel engine, a new outboard, a new main, new halyards, and having the boat pulled and resplashed several times. And btw, I did the diesel removal and replacements myself otherwise the price would have been even higher.

I bought this boat to train me specifically on monohull sailboats even though I have owned 10 other boats both power and sail in the past. The sailboats I owned were all small racing catamarans though.
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Old 12-08-2013, 13:52   #5
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Re: Seaworthy

Thanks for the replies. I don't mind getting bashed. Bring it on! My question is naive because when it comes to sailing, I'm a total newb.

Just trying to understand what kinds of maintenance/prep would need to be done post-purchase, assuming the boat is in good shape.

My ideal boat would be a Morgan 41 Island Out - but finding one in my price range in good condition might be tough.
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Old 12-08-2013, 13:52   #6
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Re: Seaworthy

Perhaps you are confusing seaworthy and provisioning? A lot goes into supplying a boat and prepping for a voyage. But as Boatman suggested, if the water is on the outside and everything working satisfactorily then it is seaworthy. As to whether you have redundancy systems in place and provisioned for cruising, that is a different question.
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Old 12-08-2013, 14:03   #7
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Re: Seaworthy

The cost of everything goes way up on a boat that size. You're looking for a bargain-priced relatively large boat, but have a look at the cost of replacing the sails (for example) before you sign any dotted line.
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Old 12-08-2013, 14:13   #8
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Re: Seaworthy

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The cost of everything goes way up on a boat that size. You're looking for a bargain-priced relatively large boat, but have a look at the cost of replacing the sails (for example) before you sign any dotted line.
Thanks, will do. That's my ideal boat, meaning I'll probably end up with something different. Like maybe a 36'. Just depends on the market when its time to buy.

After doing quite a bit of reading I'm getting the drift on maintenance. Seems like everyone is always working on something on their boats.

That's kinda why I am looking for a bargain - cuz if I spend too much on the boat itself, I won't be able to budget as much for repairs. Now you could argue that if I bought a better boat, I wouldn't have to worry about repairs as much, but I'm not buying that argument.

If I pay 90k for a boat, I'll still have to replace the sails at some point. And the engine. And so on.
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Old 12-08-2013, 14:18   #9
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Re: Seaworthy

The best advice I can give to people who get the cruising bug is to buy a copy of Buy, Outfit and Sail by Capt. Fatty Goodlander.

Good luck and fair winds,

Jesse
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Old 12-08-2013, 14:19   #10
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Re: Seaworthy

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The best advice I can give to people who get the cruising bug is to buy a copy of Buy, Outfit and Sail by Capt. Fatty Goodlander.

Good luck and fair winds,

Jesse
Sweet! Thank you. That looks like an excellent resource.
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Old 12-08-2013, 14:20   #11
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Re: Seaworthy

Here's the thing. You can buy a decent boat in that size range for that price range and it may be "ready to cruise" However it is not going to be a new boat and things will be needing replacement and systems will break. A big part of sailing, imo, is being able to fix things. I bought a 41' boat built in 1976 just over a year ago. Everything worked fine and some major work had been done: Bottom peel, barrier coat, new through hulls and sea cocks. Since then I have replaced the fuel tank, tracked down and fixed a few short circuits that were not short circuits until after I had been aboard for a while. Replaced head intake hoses after I found one cracked and leaking. (engine intake and all drain hoses had been replaced when they did the through hulls.) The refrigeration works OK but I have occasionally had to fonzi it and I plan on replacing it in the next year.

I am a live aboard and plan to go cruising in 3 or 4 years. Until then I am repairing, replacing and buying spare parts to store on board. I feel like I need 25-35k in spare parts and other gear over then next few years and then time to cast off!

I am a long time sailor and even spent some time in my youth working as a rigger and at boatyards; I am learning more than I ever knew just by living aboard and going through my boat's systems. It is nice for me that I can do that at the dock with shore power and helpful/knowledgable neighbors close by.

No real need to go smaller to learn how to fix stuff, you may as well get the boat you want and start learning.
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Old 12-08-2013, 16:14   #12
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Re: Seaworthy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lonestaralaskan View Post
Thanks for the replies. I don't mind getting bashed. Bring it on! My question is naive because when it comes to sailing, I'm a total newb.

Just trying to understand what kinds of maintenance/prep would need to be done post-purchase, assuming the boat is in good shape.

My ideal boat would be a Morgan 41 Island Out - but finding one in my price range in good condition might be tough.
Morgan 41 Out Island eh? ( I know he didn't actually say Island Out........jeez)

Your biggest problem may be learning how to tack that darn condo on the water. You could just get a beachside cottage ...........
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Old 12-08-2013, 16:17   #13
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Re: Seaworthy

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Originally Posted by cranki View Post
Here's the thing. You can buy a decent boat in that size range for that price range and it may be "ready to cruise" However it is not going to be a new boat and things will be needing replacement and systems will break. A big part of sailing, imo, is being able to fix things. I bought a 41' boat built in 1976 just over a year ago. Everything worked fine and some major work had been done: Bottom peel, barrier coat, new through hulls and sea cocks. Since then I have replaced the fuel tank, tracked down and fixed a few short circuits that were not short circuits until after I had been aboard for a while. Replaced head intake hoses after I found one cracked and leaking. (engine intake and all drain hoses had been replaced when they did the through hulls.) The refrigeration works OK but I have occasionally had to fonzi it and I plan on replacing it in the next year.

I am a live aboard and plan to go cruising in 3 or 4 years. Until then I am repairing, replacing and buying spare parts to store on board. I feel like I need 25-35k in spare parts and other gear over then next few years and then time to cast off!

I am a long time sailor and even spent some time in my youth working as a rigger and at boatyards; I am learning more than I ever knew just by living aboard and going through my boat's systems. It is nice for me that I can do that at the dock with shore power and helpful/knowledgable neighbors close by.

No real need to go smaller to learn how to fix stuff, you may as well get the boat you want and start learning.
What? 25-35k in spare parts? Jeez............folks have sailed around the world on $10,000 boats and under with very few spares......
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Old 12-08-2013, 16:24   #14
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pirate Re: Seaworthy

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Originally Posted by thomm225 View Post
What? 25-35k in spare parts? Jeez............folks have sailed around the world on $10,000 boats and under with very few spares......
Each to their own limits and abilities... some do need the AC and WM... not to mention at least 2 other cabins for crew..
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Old 12-08-2013, 16:50   #15
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Re: Seaworthy

Most of that 25-35k will not be for spares but for things like:

Expanding bimini and making it so I can enclose the cockpit.

A new RIB Dinghy and 10-15hp outboard

Some new rigging ( would like to set up a roller furling rig for mainsail)

A Hooka or other brand of 12 volt diving compressor

New Refrigeration unit

Radar

Sat phone

AIS

Possibly a liferaft

Canvas to shade the decks in the tropics, windscoops for hatches,

New hatches to replace the 36 -year old ones that are corroding and do not exactly keep all the rain out.

New battery banks before casting off for a few years


Probably 15 - 20 K there right off the top of my head.

An incomplete list of spares I would like to have onboard:

Anchor and ground tackle
Some running rigging and some standing rigging
Engine parts including oil cooler, alternator, Starter, plenty o filters, couple impellers, etc.
laptop computer
bilge pump
Maybe a seacock or 2 just in case.

Sure it can be done cheaper and it can be done for a lot more. I fall somewhere in the middle. Just saying when you really get into it there is more than meets the eye.
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