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Old 14-08-2013, 09:38   #46
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Re: Seaworthy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lonestaralaskan View Post
So aside from opinions, what are the absolute necessities for having a "seaworthy" boat? That was the original question.

There have been some snarky answers, some high-level "if it floats, its ready", and some "it varies based on opinion" responses. But I think we can all agree that there are some functions of a sailboat that must be working correctly to launch.

Any suggestions on a checklist of must-have systems and equipment that should be tested and ready to go before launch?

Or let's narrow it down even more.

What are the first five basic things on a boat you would check if you were preparing for a cruise on a new-to-you sailboat?
#1 Hull/deck/keel/rudder - Structural integrity, soundness, operation... In addition, thru hulls
#2 Detailed inspection of every inch of standing rigging, then running rigging
#3 Running gear survey, operation and condition, pumps, intakes, exchangers, exhaust, shaft and shaft seal system.
#4 Electrical, Distribution panel, wiring, charging system, battery install and condition/age
#5 Equipment, windlass/ground tackle, winches, aux steerage, electronics
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Old 14-08-2013, 11:18   #47
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Re: Seaworthy

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Originally Posted by HappyMdRSailor View Post

#1 Hull/deck/keel/rudder - Structural integrity, soundness, operation... In addition, thru hulls
#2 Detailed inspection of every inch of standing rigging, then running rigging
#3 Running gear survey, operation and condition, pumps, intakes, exchangers, exhaust, shaft and shaft seal system.
#4 Electrical, Distribution panel, wiring, charging system, battery install and condition/age
#5 Equipment, windlass/ground tackle, winches, aux steerage, electronics
#1 +1! Sir
#2 replace on regular basis, esp if doing any offshore work,
#3 sails also, if a sailing boat ...
#4 yep, esp in any boat that need electricity or hydraulics (e.g. big furlers, backstay tensioners, etc.),
#5 yep, if any required to sail the boat safely,

#0 (my own!) a skipper with adequate skills and mindset,
#-1 a boat DESIGNED for the type/range of intended sailing.

Regards,
b.
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Old 14-08-2013, 11:41   #48
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Re: Seaworthy

I dont think seaworthy has anything to do with electricity.
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Old 14-08-2013, 11:51   #49
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pirate Re: Seaworthy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lonestaralaskan View Post
So aside from opinions, what are the absolute necessities for having a "seaworthy" boat? That was the original question.

There have been some snarky answers, some high-level "if it floats, its ready", and some "it varies based on opinion" responses. But I think we can all agree that there are some functions of a sailboat that must be working correctly to launch.

Any suggestions on a checklist of must-have systems and equipment that should be tested and ready to go before launch?

Or let's narrow it down even more.

What are the first five basic things on a boat you would check if you were preparing for a cruise on a new-to-you sailboat?
1/ Integrity of hull and rudder... this includes through hull fittings.
2/ Integrity of rigging... standing and running... includes mast and fittings
3/ Integrity of deck, portlights and hatches, deck fittings (winches etc), and anchor gear.
4/ Propulsion/Power... Condition of sails, engine.. batteries...
5/ Equipment... Wheel/Tiller Pilot, VHF, Speed and Depth log, GPS/Chartplotter... bilge pumps in good working order.
Anything else is icing on the cake and can be lived without..
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Old 14-08-2013, 12:04   #50
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Re: Seaworthy

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Originally Posted by Cheechako View Post
I dont think seaworthy has anything to do with electricity.
It does when the boat has a vital part of rig or structure run on electricity.

Not common in a small boat but basically a rule in modern +60' cruising boats.

E.g. the boat I am breaking now has hydraulic furlers. The "back-up" is via a winch handle driving the furler. Believe me or not, there is no way one can furl this genoa manually in anything like real wind conditions. Ergo, sin electricite she becomes unseaworthy.

b.
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Old 14-08-2013, 12:56   #51
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Re: Seaworthy

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Originally Posted by Cheechako View Post
I dont think seaworthy has anything to do with electricity.
I suppose not, if you are using oil lamps for your running lights...
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Old 14-08-2013, 15:36   #52
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boatman61 View Post

1/ Integrity of hull and rudder... this includes through hull fittings.
2/ Integrity of rigging... standing and running... includes mast and fittings
3/ Integrity of deck, portlights and hatches, deck fittings (winches etc), and anchor gear.
4/ Propulsion/Power... Condition of sails, engine.. batteries...
5/ Equipment... Wheel/Tiller Pilot, VHF, Speed and Depth log, GPS/Chartplotter... bilge pumps in good working order.
Anything else is icing on the cake and can be lived without..
Boatie, while I deeply respect you and your accomplishments- my perception of seaworthy goes beyond the condition of the rig. Seaworthy is a question of what region the boat will be used in, and how the design meets those conditions. I absolutely love my boat, she is nimble and easy to handle. She is a great coastal and Bahamas boat. Everything I have seen says she is not seaworthy enough to take into the Southern Oceans.

So while my previous post about the skipper being the biggest factor in seaworthiness may have sounded flip, and troubled some. My perception remains that "seaworthy" comes to the choices that person at the helm makes--where to sail and how hard to push the rig when things get hairy.

That said-if my logic is flawed, please show me where.

Cheers
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Old 14-08-2013, 15:52   #53
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Re: Seaworthy

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Originally Posted by barnakiel View Post
It does when the boat has a vital part of rig or structure run on electricity.

Not common in a small boat but basically a rule in modern +60' cruising boats.

E.g. the boat I am breaking now has hydraulic furlers. The "back-up" is via a winch handle driving the furler. Believe me or not, there is no way one can furl this genoa manually in anything like real wind conditions. Ergo, sin electricite she becomes unseaworthy.

b.
I was thinking along the lines of the "what are the absolute necessities for having a "seaworthy" boat? " rather than a specific vessel. You would need electricity on a electric drive motorboat too I spose!
But bascally you need a sound structure and a means of moving the boat. ala: Lin and Larry Pardey
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Old 14-08-2013, 15:54   #54
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Re: Seaworthy

"Anything else is icing on the cake and can be lived without.."

True, but I was hoping to entice you into sailing lessons with the really
cute, most excellent cook I plan to hire. Male, female, both ?...;>))

Would adding charts, compass, a sextant, and money/trade goods, come under your equipment list ? Just trying to learn.

Quote:
Originally Posted by boatman61 View Post
1/ Integrity of hull and rudder... this includes through hull fittings.
2/ Integrity of rigging... standing and running... includes mast and fittings
3/ Integrity of deck, portlights and hatches, deck fittings (winches etc), and anchor gear.
4/ Propulsion/Power... Condition of sails, engine.. batteries...
5/ Equipment... Wheel/Tiller Pilot, VHF, Speed and Depth log, GPS/Chartplotter... bilge pumps in good working order.
Anything else is icing on the cake and can be lived without..
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Old 14-08-2013, 16:21   #55
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Re: Seaworthy

Quote:
Originally Posted by boatman61 View Post
1/ Integrity of hull and rudder... this includes through hull fittings.
2/ Integrity of rigging... standing and running... includes mast and fittings
3/ Integrity of deck, portlights and hatches, deck fittings (winches etc), and anchor gear.
4/ Propulsion/Power... Condition of sails, engine.. batteries...
5/ Equipment... Wheel/Tiller Pilot, VHF, Speed and Depth log, GPS/Chartplotter... bilge pumps in good working order.
Anything else is icing on the cake and can be lived without..
I can't disagree with any of the above criteria... but that is WAY more than five things to check!!

In general, the more complicated the boat is the more things that need to be checked prior to departure, but Boaties basic list covers the essentials pretty damn well.

But, neither he nor anyone else has mentioned checking the rum stores...

Cheers,

Jim
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Old 14-08-2013, 16:40   #56
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Re: Seaworthy

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Originally Posted by Cheechako View Post
I dont think seaworthy has anything to do with electricity.
Everything on, in and of the vessel including foodstuffs, spares, fuel and crew qualifications determine whether a vessel is "seaworthy" for a specific voyage.

The term is not a marine term but an insurance term dating back to the original Lloyds list and covered a specific vessel for a specific voyage and included every aspect of the vessel and all its systems and whatever the vessel contained, including how it was contained & maintained plus specific crew qualifications, food stuffs for that crew were also specified and everything in the insurance contract pertained to that voyage and only that voyage.
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Old 14-08-2013, 17:24   #57
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I just washed up after working on my injector pump. I have a 30+ yr old 62hp Perkins in my 1980 O/I 41. She is a seaworthy coastal sailboat. Real popular charter boat in the Caribbean. Not so popular with the race around the buoys crowd.

Not considered a blue water boat. I have never broached her and hope not to. The cockpit drains to slowly for one reason.

I'm 6'4" and like the headroom and the storage. I live aboard.

Do you plan to sail with a crew? The OI 41 can be a handful for one person. Autopilot is a big help. Before I added roller furling and lazy jacks life was pretty tough.

She pointed better with hank on headsails but the furling is worth the degrees lost. Tacking with either main or genny alone is not an issue.

We are back in the Galveston Bay Area for the next month or so.



Good luck on your hunt.
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Old 14-08-2013, 17:48   #58
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Re: Seaworthy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew B. View Post
"Anything else is icing on the cake and can be lived without.."

True, but I was hoping to entice someone into sailing lessons with the really
cute, most excellent cook I plan to hire. Male, female, both ?...;>))

Would adding charts, compass, a sextant, and money/trade goods, come under your equipment list ? Just trying to learn.
Edit that. Brain fart...
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Old 14-08-2013, 17:50   #59
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Re: Seaworthy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Snore View Post
Boatie, while I deeply respect you and your accomplishments- my perception of seaworthy goes beyond the condition of the rig. Seaworthy is a question of what region the boat will be used in, and how the design meets those conditions. I absolutely love my boat, she is nimble and easy to handle. She is a great coastal and Bahamas boat. Everything I have seen says she is not seaworthy enough to take into the Southern Oceans.

So while my previous post about the skipper being the biggest factor in seaworthiness may have sounded flip, and troubled some. My perception remains that "seaworthy" comes to the choices that person at the helm makes--where to sail and how hard to push the rig when things get hairy.

That said-if my logic is flawed, please show me where.

Cheers
Flawed logic..>> don't think the OP wants to sail the Southern Ocean...
Oh... and your Tartan would do just fine down there... if I can take a 40yr old ply 30ftr from Perth to Tasmania solo... feel pretty confident your plastic fantastic would be up to it...
Oh by the way...
Jim... did not mention RUM... as my inbox is swamped with AA crap.
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Old 14-08-2013, 18:19   #60
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Re: Seaworthy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cheechako View Post
I was thinking along the lines of the "what are the absolute necessities for having a "seaworthy" boat? " rather than a specific vessel. You would need electricity on a electric drive motorboat too I spose!
But bascally you need a sound structure and a means of moving the boat. ala: Lin and Larry Pardey
I sometimes wonder if we follow the same thinking patterns because we sail similar boats ... or is it the other way round?

Yes. I am 100% with you on this. I see pure seaworthiness a design/technical factor with other co-factors (technical and human) contributing.

Sort of to say some designs, some builds, some boats are inherently seaworthy, others are not.

As you said: 'a sound structure and a means of moving (it)'. I would also like the structure to be built in form and to parameters that promote safe sailing.

Cheers,
b.
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