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Old 12-08-2013, 17:02   #16
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Re: Seaworthy

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Each to their own limits and abilities... some do need the AC and WM... not to mention at least 2 other cabins for crew..
I bought my old Bristol 27 for $2,000 so I could learn monohulls. The thing was I had been reading on AtomVoyages a lot and thought the boat was a Triton.

I planned to buy something better and faster, but then i realized that faster in the monohull world is like a knot or two. (if you have sailing skills)

After having this boat for a couple years, I'm now realizing it will do for sailing down the coast then maybe to the Bahamas and the Leeward Islands. I'll buy a larger one later.

I plan to adjust to a natural style of warm beer, fried potatoes and onions, fish. water, and "whatnot." (Thanks Carl Chiders)

I don't have to have a pretty boat for the woman. I'll find those when I get there.

My main worry is where i will get in my long runs and 20-40 mile bike rides.
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Old 12-08-2013, 17:04   #17
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pirate Re: Seaworthy

Yeah... okay... definitely not in the $500/mth crowd..
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Old 12-08-2013, 17:39   #18
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Re: Seaworthy

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Ready to cruise is seaworthy... if everything works and water stays on the outside...
Others may disagree...
+1......
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Old 12-08-2013, 18:07   #19
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Re: Seaworthy

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(...) comments by some posters about how it could take a lot of time and work to get a boat seaworthy for a long cruise.

(...) what kind of "things" would I expect to need to do in order to make the boat seaworthy? (...)
You know: there are cruises and then there are cruises. What is your intended cruising style/area anyways?

Some boats will never be seaworthy, by design, or by build.

Others can be turn key.

Still others may be potentials: well designed and well built but not up to the demands that may have to be met in a specific sort of cruising.

I think it is the last type when people say 'it may take a lot of time and effort'. As it may.

In our case, we got a turn key one and set sail something like a month from when we set our feet on her deck.

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Old 12-08-2013, 18:30   #20
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I plan to adjust to a natural style of warm beer, fried potatoes and onions, fish. water, and "whatnot." (Thanks Carl Chiders)

I don't have to have a pretty boat for the woman. I'll find those when I get there.
For cold beer buy an Engel, Godamnit. Just do it. You will not regret it. Best thing since sliced bread.

Believe me, as long as you do your dishes, keep yourself and your boat clean and tidy then you will impress beautiful adventurous women along the way

We might be in a bit of echo chamber here, but the reality is there are very few real cruisers/voyagers. You are doing something adventurous, exciting and man-ly. Women love that. (Men love adventurous cruising women too.)
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Old 12-08-2013, 18:34   #21
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I plan to adjust to a natural style of warm beer, fried potatoes and onions
Yes!! My beautiful wife makes me curried fried potatoes and onions every day for lunch while we are underway. It's cheap, filling, satisfying good tucker.
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Old 12-08-2013, 18:55   #22
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Re: Seaworthy

Im with Boatie on this one! My first cruise boat was a 30 ft Folk Boat, wood, no thru hulls! Long shaft Sea Gull for power, bucket for a head, water in 5 Gal jugs, Food was canned and dry lite boy scout stuff, and lots of spam! I took her to Hawyee after haveing her for 4 weeks! So if ya look there are seaworthy boats out there! And for a price yall can afford, but ya might have to go with a lot less than some folks just have to have to cruise!! Just my 2 cents
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Old 12-08-2013, 19:04   #23
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Geez! You guys are slipping. The key to a seaworthy boat is the skipper. A great skipper (not me) can take a POS TransAtlantic, a poor skipper can loose the same boat crossing the Gulf Stream.

If you will be coastal, or just island hoping, do you need a boat built to round Cape Horn?
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Old 12-08-2013, 19:47   #24
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Re: Seaworthy

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Thanks for the replies. I don't mind getting bashed. Bring it on! My question is naive because when it comes to sailing, I'm a total newb.

Just trying to understand what kinds of maintenance/prep would need to be done post-purchase, assuming the boat is in good shape.

My ideal boat would be a Morgan 41 Island Out - but finding one in my price range in good condition might be tough.
There is a decent looking Morgan down here in San Diego. It looks like they spent a good amount of time on the cosmetics...

It is in your price range too. If you don't need speed this might be for you:

1983 Morgan Out Island 41 Sail Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com

One warning - if you plan on sailing in a rally or regatta you will be frustrated but those Morgans sure do last
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Old 12-08-2013, 19:54   #25
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Re: Seaworthy

One persons ready to cruise is another's " what are you waiting for?"
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Old 12-08-2013, 20:07   #26
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Re: Seaworthy

Breathing a sigh of relief. So its really a matter of personal taste/style as to what needs to be done before drifting away. That makes a lot more sense to me. Being a woman, I focus on the important stuff. You know - A/C, refrigerator, decent bathroom, roomy cabin.... just kidding!!
But I'm gettin the idea now. It just depends on where you're going and how you like to travel.

Nice boat, FiG. But I'm not in the market for a while. =/ Just studying up while I build up some funds. Thanks though. That's pretty much exactly what I'm looking for.
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Old 12-08-2013, 20:28   #27
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Re: Seaworthy

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Breathing a sigh of relief. So its really a matter of personal taste/style as to what needs to be done before drifting away. That makes a lot more sense to me. Being a woman, I focus on the important stuff. You know - A/C, refrigerator, decent bathroom, roomy cabin.... just kidding!!
But I'm gettin the idea now. It just depends on where you're going and how you like to travel.

Nice boat, FiG. But I'm not in the market for a while. =/ Just studying up while I build up some funds. Thanks though. That's pretty much exactly what I'm looking for.
No problem. I don't think you should have a problem finding a fairly good version in that price range in the future. They also added a bit more sail in the 80's. There are others that are fully outfitted out there too like this one:

1974 41' Morgan outisland in Sailboats | eBay Motors

good for comparison but I don't think the price is right
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Old 12-08-2013, 20:35   #28
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Re: Seaworthy

It is all about the systems,

If everything is so old that you can't service, repair, maintain then the boat will not be seaworthy,

If every repair or maintenance job becomes a major upgrade then you will be constantly waiting for parts, funds, etc.

You may want to consider adding a few items to your spares list including starter, alternator, relays, sensors, hell we even have a spare heat exchanger on board not to mention a complete wiring loom to the control panel at the binnacle.. If you have a gen set then all the same parts for it as well. Depends where you plan to cruise as some areas of the world are almost impossible to get parts, (Indonesia, PNG,)

Hell even the good old USA came be a problem if your boat is old enough.

I knew a guy from the keys who spent a lot of time in Cuba. He even had a lathe on his boat. He was a singlehander and his boat was seaworthy.
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Old 12-08-2013, 20:58   #29
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Re: Seaworthy

Hey, lonestar... think about your creature comforts as bobconnie mentions... boatman61 has some great advice. You don't need to go big to go fun. As long as she is seaworthy and has the comfort you need, you'll be fine. Women have different needs/requirements than guys do so listen to the women on this forum.
I did and saved myself a lot of drama with women I've cruised with. Seaworthyness is something you must test for yourself with a knowledgeable sailor.
Good luck with your search... your are in an area, PNW, that is known for their sturdy, sea going vessels... Cheers, Phil
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Old 13-08-2013, 07:30   #30
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Re: Seaworthy

Yes, we women do enjoy certain creature comforts. I was raised in Alaska and I know how to rough it, but that doesn't mean I want to! At least not all the time.

By the way, do a lot of boats sell at list price? Just wondering.
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