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Old 03-09-2012, 15:39   #1
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Sailor Lost in Knock Down

Edmund Cabot was swept from his yacht off the coast of Newfoundland this week.

I just completed my circumnavigation of the island and passed through these same waters a bit ago so the story has some personal interest to me.

Mr. Cabot apparently was a occasional contributor to Ocean Navigator.

My condolences.

Edmund B. Cabot, Brahmin scion and avid yachtsman, drowns off Newfoundland - Metro Desk - Local news updates from The Boston Globe
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Old 03-09-2012, 15:48   #2
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Re: Sailor lost in knock down

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Originally Posted by hpeer View Post
Edmund Cabot was swept from his yacht off the coast of Newfoundland this week.

I just completed my circumnavigation of the island and passed through these same waters a bit ago so the story has some personal interest to me.

Mr. Cabot apparently was a occasional contributor to Ocean Navigator.

My condolences.

Edmund B. Cabot, Brahmin scion and avid yachtsman, drowns off Newfoundland - Metro Desk - Local news updates from The Boston Globe

It's so sad to hear a story like that.
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Old 03-09-2012, 18:30   #3
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Re: Sailor Lost in Knock Down

Pretty tragic.
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Old 03-09-2012, 18:33   #4
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Re: Sailor Lost in Knock Down

YIKES... This is not how this story was supposed to end. RIP captain... Your fine life was cut short.
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Old 03-09-2012, 18:39   #5
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Re: Sailor Lost in Knock Down

Just a reminder that we only get to choose how we live our lives -- not how long.
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Old 03-09-2012, 18:43   #6
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Re: Sailor Lost in Knock Down

Sad. Ned was both a terrific guy and a terrific cruiser. He did some most excellent voyages, quietly and competently, without blowing his horn about them.
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Old 03-09-2012, 18:58   #7
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Re: Sailor Lost in Knock Down

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Sad. Ned was both a terrific guy and a terrific cruiser. He did some most excellent voyages, quietly and competently, without blowing his horn about them.

So here's a question (NOT questioning what anyone on this crew did) ...

I don't think the captain would have had a chance to be clipped into the cockpit, just coming up, but apparently the helmsman wasn't -- or maybe he was, and that's why he went back to the cockpit?

I've heard conflicting advice about using things like jacklines, with some suggesting that you might well just land in the water being dragged too fast to save yourself, possibly with broken ribs.
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Old 03-09-2012, 19:49   #8
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Re: Sailor Lost in Knock Down

A few "Cape Horners" (sailors who rounded Cape Horn on real sailing ships carrying cargo) were my teachers and they taught me "one hand for the ship and one hand for myself". If we needed 2 hands, then we called for help from another crew member. In over 50 years at sea as a professional mariner, I have never used a harness, jack lines or put my faith in anything other than myself when underway. There are harnesses aboard for any who choose to use them.
As you might imagine, I have sailed through numerous gales and several hurricanes at sea in one circumnavigation and many Atlantic, Pacific and Mediterranean voyages.
I am in no way suggesting that anyone not use whatever safety equipment they choose. I just prefer to rely on myself.
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Old 03-09-2012, 20:01   #9
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Re: Sailor Lost in Knock Down

My take of this specific situation is that the conditions were not very bad ('strong winds' but not 'storm') and not the sort of situation where he would have expected to get knocked down nor need a tether. I believe the round up/knock down was caused by the steering chain braking (Ned had a lot of miles on his boat).

My personal practice is to wear a dry suit rather than the more typical weather gear">foul weather gear. I do this because the dry suit has both natural buoyancy and protects you quite a bit from the cold water. Those two factors combine dramatically extend your survival time in the water. Further, it actually keeps you completely dry - no drips down the sleeves or collar as with 'normal' foul weather gear.

There are all sorts of different philosophy's about using tethers. However, it is possible, and is standard procedure on some boats, to clip in as/before you climb up into the cockpit. Typically these boats stow their tethers clipped to hooks just outside the companionway, and you reach up and clip in your harness before you climb the steps.Then your tether either slides on a jackline on along the cockpit sole or you use a dual tether to clip in near the wheel and unclip from the companionway.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rakuflames View Post
So here's a question (NOT questioning what anyone on this crew did) ...

I don't think the captain would have had a chance to be clipped into the cockpit, just coming up, but apparently the helmsman wasn't -- or maybe he was, and that's why he went back to the cockpit?

I've heard conflicting advice about using things like jacklines, with some suggesting that you might well just land in the water being dragged too fast to save yourself, possibly with broken ribs.
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Old 03-09-2012, 20:06   #10
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Re: Sailor Lost in Knock Down

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Originally Posted by estarzinger View Post
My take of this specific situation is that the conditions were not very bad ('strong winds' but not 'storm') and not the sort of situation where he would have expected to get knocked down nor need a tether. I believe the round up/knock down was caused by the steering chain braking (Ned had a lot of miles on his boat).

My personal practice is to wear a dry suit rather than the more typical foul weather gear. I do this because the dry suit has both natural buoyancy and protects you quite a bit from the cold water. Those two factors combine dramatically extend your survival time in the water. Further, it actually keeps you completely dry - no drips down the sleeves or collar as with 'normal' foul weather gear.

There are all sorts of different philosophy's about using tethers. However, it is possible, and is standard procedure on some boats, to clip in as/before you climb up into the cockpit. Typically these boats stow their tethers clipped to hooks just outside the companionway, and you reach up and clip in your harness before you climb the steps.Then your tether either slides on a jackline on along the cockpit sole or you use a dual tether to clip in near the wheel and unclip from the companionway.

I follow all of that ... but what's a dry suit?
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Old 03-09-2012, 20:13   #11
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Re: Sailor Lost in Knock Down

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I follow all of that ... but what's a dry suit?
Just two examples:

MPX DRYSUIT | MPX Gore-Tex Pro Shell | Sailing Clothes | Musto Outdoor Clothing

Kokatat | GORE-TEX® Expedition Dry Suit - Men - Men's - Gender
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Old 03-09-2012, 20:30   #12
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Re: Sailor Lost in Knock Down


Looks a lot easier to move around in than foulies. Thanks.
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Old 03-09-2012, 20:39   #13
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Re: Sailor Lost in Knock Down

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rakuflames View Post
So here's a question (NOT questioning what anyone on this crew did) ...

I don't think the captain would have had a chance to be clipped into the cockpit, just coming up, but apparently the helmsman wasn't -- or maybe he was, and that's why he went back to the cockpit?

I've heard conflicting advice about using things like jacklines, with some suggesting that you might well just land in the water being dragged too fast to save ourself, possibly with broken ribs.
Very tragic event. Though this is the second sailor this year to be lost when coming up to the cockpit from below. There was the woman who was also swept over the side near Bermuda in April(?). Seems to be a dangerous transition time when things happen fast. Perhaps Cabot was being called upon because of the steering failure. All the more reason to be holding on tight or be hooked in when heading to the helm before leaving the companionway.
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Old 03-09-2012, 20:44   #14
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Re: Sailor Lost in Knock Down

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Originally Posted by capta View Post
A few "Cape Horners" (sailors who rounded Cape Horn on real sailing ships carrying cargo) were my teachers and they taught me "one hand for the ship and one hand for myself". If we needed 2 hands, then we called for help from another crew member. In over 50 years at sea as a professional mariner, I have never used a harness, jack lines or put my faith in anything other than myself when underway. There are harnesses aboard for any who choose to use them.
As you might imagine, I have sailed through numerous gales and several hurricanes at sea in one circumnavigation and many Atlantic, Pacific and Mediterranean voyages.
I am in no way suggesting that anyone not use whatever safety equipment they choose. I just prefer to rely on myself.
In the climbing world, this is called "free climbing". It's relying on yourself for each hand hold and each transition from the base of the climb to the top. The same climb can be done by another climber using protection and ropes. The difference between the free climber and the one who choses to use protection is that that person lives to climb again.

The human hand can hold, at most , a few hundred lbs. A direct full force blow of a wave across one's body can generate well over 1000 lbs.

Eventually, we all make mistakes. If you want to tout not wearing seat belts when driving and not clipping in when sailing in rough weather, I think it's best to not mention it to others in a public forum.

This is a tragic story and the lesson is not that "sailing is risky business". The lesson is: When in rough weather it's a good idea to clip in.
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Old 03-09-2012, 21:16   #15
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Re: Sailor Lost in Knock Down

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In the climbing world, this is called "free climbing". It's relying on yourself for each hand hold and each transition from the base of the climb to the top. The same climb can be done by another climber using protection and ropes. The difference between the free climber and the one who choses to use protection is that that person lives to climb again.

The human hand can hold, at most , a few hundred lbs. A direct full force blow of a wave across one's body can generate well over 1000 lbs.

Eventually, we all make mistakes. If you want to tout not wearing seat belts when driving and not clipping in when sailing in rough weather, I think it's best to not mention it to others in a public forum.

This is a tragic story and the lesson is not that "sailing is risky business". The lesson is: When in rough weather it's a good idea to clip in.

Touche
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