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View Poll Results: Would you sail a 27 ft Coronado to the South Pacific?
Yes 10 24.39%
Maybe 8 19.51%
No 18 43.90%
It would be suicide 5 12.20%
Voters: 41. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-09-2013, 10:34   #16
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Re: Sailing to Hawaii in a 27 foot Coronado

Originally Posted by gjordan View Post
Watersofdiego, I am going to do a little thread drift here, and say that anyone on the west coast considering their FIRST PASSAGE, might want to NOT GO TO HAWAII. I know this will stir up controversy, but going from southern California to Hawaii is like going to Hollywood West. You arrive to concrete docks, huge paved parking lots and what look like mile high condos. As many wanabe cruisers have discovered on arrival to Honolulu, the airport is just a quick taxi ride away, and tired cranky mates, or crew have been known to step of off the boat before the dock lines are even tied, and never look back. What I would recommend (which scares a lot of people) is for your first passage to be from Mexico to the Marquesas. That is after cruising Mexico for a winter season. It is only a week or ten days longer trip, and you arrive at an exotic (not concrete) location that very few people will see in their lifetime. Even if you are tired and hate the boat at that point, you cant just jump on an airplane and leave. A couple of good nights sleep after a passage is heavenly, and can go a long way towards changing attitudes. Then you get to cruise in one of the few places on earth that are close to the idea of paradise. The Tuamotus are even more remote and Tahiti is great if you get away from the crowds. Many cruisers never realize that there is much more to Tahiti than Papeete . If at that point or hopefully later you sell or give the boat away, you will have gained an experience that few people will ever have. As far as the Coronado goes, if the rig is good and you have a very reliable self steering gear, then it will do the trick. Not as comfortable as the big expensive boats, but Tahiti looks the same from the cockpit of a 27 foot boat as it does from a 47 foot boat. Again, I think a winter in Mexico is a great learning ground. The best of luck to you, and remember that really good ground tackle is the best insurance that you can have. _____Grant.

Great idea!

There's tons of videos on Youtube of sailing to the Marquesas.


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Old 05-09-2013, 11:50   #17
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Re: Sailing to Hawaii in a 27 foot Coronado

Here is a list of boats that have completed the Singlehanded Transpac Race from San Francisco to Hawaii. There are lots of 20-27' boats. Remember though, these boats have been prepared for the race, and most of the skippers have lots of experience:

Looks like one of the Cal 2-27s made the trip in 15 days: 11 hours.

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Old 05-09-2013, 12:24   #18
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Re: Sailing to Hawaii in a 27 foot Coronado

On your poll I said yes. Roverhi stated it very plainly. I won't repeat what he said. Don't pay attention to folks who said get another boat. Don't pay attention to folks who aren't answering the questions you ask. Your first Hawaiian port will be Hilo if you pick the closest one. No highrises. Just a Matson container yard at Radio Bay.

Just learn how to sail and repair your boat well. Standing rigging (including chainplates) and rudder posts will be things you should concentrate on. You can lived with leaks and soft decks but they will be a distraction.

Good luck.
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Old 05-09-2013, 19:19   #19
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Re: Sailing to Hawaii in a 27 foot Coronado

Skipper John, good post, but lots of boats go straight to Honozoolu because it has those concrete docks and showers and big box stores. Might as well have stayed in San Diego. Dont get me wrong, I like Hawaii, but for someone that wants real cruising I dont think Hollywood West is a good choice. But I realize that it is just my opinion. _____Grant.
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Old 05-09-2013, 22:25   #20
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Re: Sailing to Hawaii in a 27 foot Coronado

+1 to Roverhi's comments.

The boat is not inherently inappropriate for the trip and with some care and forethought should do fine.

barnakiel's suggestion of a Minitransat would, to me, be inherently inappropriate. They are not designed for ocean cruising but instead for ocean racing. While they would be very fast, they are built light meaning a limited lifespan in ocean conditions, minimal amenities for living aboard and high workload while sailing.
A house is but a boat so poorly built and so firmly run aground no one would think to try and refloat it.
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Old 06-09-2013, 17:05   #21
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Re: Sailing to Hawaii in a 27 foot Coronado

Please do not waste my tax dollars by having the CG come out after you. This site seems to have its fair share of green horn loose cannons. If you don't know what kind of boat and how to rig and sail it you should not be making that passage. Unfortunately there are some who may encourage you on this site. The responsible answer is you need to learn and get experience then you will not have to ask the question you will know what boat with what modifications is needed for a long offshore passage. If you have not crewed on a boat doing such a passage its a good idea to do so with a capable skipper that way you can learn and decide if you like that kind of sailing.
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Old 06-09-2013, 17:32   #22
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Re: Sailing to Hawaii in a 27 foot Coronado

I, too, have voted no. And I hope you noticed what Zeehag implied, which is that sailing in the gentle breezes and flat seas of San Diego is not really adequate preparation for a long offshore passage. Nor is only one year, unless you're learning and sailing almost every day.

I did sail to Hawaii from San Francisco with the man who is now my husband, and in a 30 ft. boat, and he had lots more experience than me, including singlehand racing. In the size range you're looking at, I would make a different choice. Frankly, I would prefer a higher quality vessel.

However, as a boat to learn some sailing, and enjoy, it should stand you in good stead. As you gain experience with your boat and with others more experienced than yourself, your plans may change.

Your chances of making a successful South Pacific cruise will be maximized by doing enough sailing first to learn how to handle your boat in bad weather. This means, among other things, that you'll take her out in successively heavier airs, and learn her likes and dislikes. Because she's going to partner you in an environment where you can easily lose your life. This is best done when you still have access to warm showers at the end of the day. Eventually, you'll take her out in one of those southerly storms, and put your practice at heaving to to use. Give yourself time to develop some respect for what you're about to do.
Ann & Jim, U.S. s/v Insatiable II, SE Qld, for a while
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Old 06-09-2013, 17:40   #23
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Re: Sailing to Hawaii in a 27 foot Coronado

I cannot understand why people wish to put themselves in harms way with toy boats and little experience. If those who do ever require rescue, they should be billed for the rescue expenses
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Old 06-09-2013, 17:55   #24
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Re: Sailing to Hawaii in a 27 foot Coronado

Hiya Foggy! The State of Washington bills rescued people off Mt. Renier at a cost of $350,000 per rescue. Still unprepared folks will tempt their luck, and often lose! Why the military of the world enlist the young? <Captain Bligh: "...don't think...thinking confuses you..."> If the required training to sail the seven seas was as rigid as earning a pilot's license and beyond...

There is no cure for stupidity!

Retired - Don't Ask Me To Do A Damn Thing!
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hawaii, paracelle, sail, sailing

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