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Old 16-07-2013, 04:27   #16
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Re: Sailing against the weather

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Originally Posted by mrohr View Post
Well If by "modern "The OP means high freeboard, low weight ,full sections and a rather flat and full entry, I am inclined to agree that in gale conditions this type of craft be at a disadvantage compared to many traditional craft when going to weather and manned by the usual mom and pop crew.

It is almost a given that the sea state will be short and steep and brutal. It has been my experience that those with the dingy type hull form will have a particularly difficult time getting away from our dreaded lee shore. That said, in lighter conditions or downwind, or even marina living ,going modern has a lot of appeal.

There was a thread a while back that got a little silly regarding this lee shore business but I think this topic is worth exploring ;besides it was 102 degrees today here in the Hudson Valley and I am afraid to go outside to my boat.

I view the high freeboard on my boat as a third, untrimmable sail. I have to take it into consideration any time the wind is above 15 mph for steerage, esp. in things like docking. In fact I used it as the power for steering once when I had no steering to get my boat out of harm's way and safely into someone's slip (then I called them and confirmed that they were out cruising, and they gladly gave me permission to use their slip under the circumstances).

Turned out that the guy who installed my new rudder, who is normally very good, forgot to cross the cables going to the wheel. It's not that I had no steering but that the boat was steering as if it had a tiller.

I only had a couple of seconds to make a plan, and ignoring the wheel and using the wind on the side of the boat worked well. But it can be a challenge in rough, confused water ...
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Old 16-07-2013, 04:29   #17
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Re: Sailing against the weather

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Originally Posted by stevensuf View Post
surely the tacking angle has a lot to do with it? we can tack through less than 80 degrees in ideal conditions, but more like 110 degrees in stronger winds, sloppier seas.

Oh the tacks won't be as tight, that's for sure, and that could happen at a time when you *really* need to get away from the shore quickly ... as others have said, make sure you're not on a lee shore if there's a chance of storms.

Don't like shallow water, I don't ....
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Old 16-07-2013, 04:41   #18
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Re: Sailing against the weather

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Originally Posted by barnakiel View Post
Send a PM to Mark J, ask if his Bene will.
Interesting point is what wind strengths the OP means. A gale is 35 to 40 knots. I've gone up wind in 35 in this boat, as in on the nose. Ive done 60-70 degrees in about 60 for an hour or two to get accross a squall. But I havent been embayed, or had to claw off a lee shore.

I would guess all modern boats built in the last 20 years could do it easily.

Remember close to a lee shore you get all sorts of reflected waves and that can make things more difficult, and much bigger waves as it gets shallower too.

I, too, want to see the article because I dont believe boats cant sail off a lee shore in 35 to 40 kts.
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Old 16-07-2013, 04:45   #19
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Re: Sailing against the weather

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Originally Posted by stevensuf View Post
surely the tacking angle has a lot to do with it? we can tack through less than 80 degrees in ideal conditions, but more like 110 degrees in stronger winds, sloppier seas.
110 degrees is fine to get you off a lee shore. You can even add another 20 degrees leeway on both tacks and get out.

Might just take a while and exercise your winching arm!
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Old 16-07-2013, 04:52   #20
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Re: Sailing against the weather

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Originally Posted by MarkJ View Post
Interesting point is what wind strengths the OP means. A gale is 35 to 40 knots. I've gone up wind in 35 in this boat, as in on the nose. Ive done 60-70 degrees in about 60 for an hour or two to get accross a squall. But I havent been embayed, or had to claw off a lee shore.

I would guess all modern boats built in the last 20 years could do it easily.

Remember close to a lee shore you get all sorts of reflected waves and that can make things more difficult, and much bigger waves as it gets shallower too.

I, too, want to see the article because I dont believe boats cant sail off a lee shore in 35 to 40 kts.

I think we've proven here -- over and over again -- that sailors often use neither "gale" nor "storm" as precision terms. One can find soures that define them with precision but even that doesn't describe the situation fully -- what is the sea like? At the beginning of a "storm" it hasn't built up as much and can be gotten through more easily. The Gulf of Mexico can stay riled up for a couple of days after a "storm" because so much of it is so shallow. It's like soup slopping along the sides of a shallow bowl as you walk down a bumpy path.

However, even if one technically "can't get off the lee shore," one should fight the tendency of the boat to move toward it, and at least try to keep it where it is so it doesn't get blown/pushed into the shallows, where the real danger is. Until you end up there, you've got a rough ride, but it will end eventually. So even shallow tacks -- or a controlled gybe to turn -- are better than doing nothing. The one good thing is that you have plenty of points of reference to make sure that controlled gybe is complete enough to angle you more out to sea.

The comment that someone else made about whether to cut the anchor rode gave me the shivers.
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