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Old 20-06-2010, 13:53   #1
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Questions on Using a Broker and Lead Time to Start Looking Seriously

We went down to the All Sail show in Oakland and were able to crawl thru a few boats. I like the Island Packets a lot. Attended John and Amanda Neal (sp) offshore seminar.

Here are the questions:

1. We are looking at buying the boat about 2 years out. When do you start looking in earnest?

2. Really don't want one until I sell the house, but would you borrow the bucks for the right boat and pay it off once you sell the house?

3. Buyer Broker? Get one or not? One guy or Multiple?

4. If number 3 is yes, anyone with a recommendation in the Nortwest?

I thought the Neal's did a good job of making me a little more open minded on boats to consider and what to look for in a boat.

5. One of the boats they suggested was a 35 Wauquiez. Saildrive? No personal expereince with them, but I don't like the looks of them. Opinions or experience?

Thanks in advance.

DW from Boise, temporarily in Naknek, Ak.
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Old 20-06-2010, 14:43   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duckwheat View Post
1. We are looking at buying the boat about 2 years out. When do you start looking in earnest?

New or used? If looking for a used boat and you have the option to buy sooner if you find a great deal then start now.


2. Really don't want one until I sell the house, but would you borrow the bucks for the right boat and pay it off once you sell the house?

If you find a great deal where the savings justify the interest you would pay on the loan then yes.


3. Buyer Broker? Get one or not? One guy or Multiple?

Not multiple unless you are shopping in multiple, far apart, locations. Also depends on your knowledge, experience and your ability to sort through boats on the market. If you feel the need for a broker and find one you like and trust and is willing to work for you then let him or her do the job. Otherwise I would search for boats on the market and if one is listed through a broker then deal with that broker. If through an owner then buy direct. In any case, no matter what else get a good surveyor!


4. If number 3 is yes, anyone with a recommendation in the Nortwest?

Sorry, I'm an east coast guy.


5. One of the boats they suggested was a 35 Wauquiez. Saildrive? No personal expereince with them, but I don't like the looks of them. Opinions or experience?

No personal experience but I do have an opinion. I would prefer traditional prop shaft and for long distance, far away from parts and expert mechanics would insist. For weekends, local cruising if a good deal would not turn down an otherwise really good deal due to saildrive power.

Good luck

Skip
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Old 20-06-2010, 14:44   #3
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You questions beg a few more questions: Are you retiring in a few years and do you plan to live aboard?

If yes, I would start looking now, buy the boat that suits you and spend the next year or so getting to know it and outfitting it for live aboard cruising. But do this only if you really know what you want and what to do with it. Otherwise you will be selling in a few years. Maybe that can't be helped. I seem to buy and sell a boat every three years or so myself.

To answer your other questions:

3. Most people are better off finding a broker they like, trust and can work with.
4. No recommendation in that area.
5. Saildrives, being a big chunk of aluminum have had corrosion problems. I would stay away from them.

David
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Old 20-06-2010, 16:13   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by djmarchand View Post
You questions beg a few more questions: Are you retiring in a few years and do you plan to live aboard?

If yes, I would start looking now, buy the boat that suits you and spend the next year or so getting to know it and outfitting it for live aboard cruising. But do this only if you really know what you want and what to do with it. Otherwise you will be selling in a few years. Maybe that can't be helped. I seem to buy and sell a boat every three years or so myself.

To answer your other questions:

3. Most people are better off finding a broker they like, trust and can work with.
4. No recommendation in that area.
5. Saildrives, being a big chunk of aluminum have had corrosion problems. I would stay away from them.

David
We are moving to the NW coast in 2 years. We will continure to work for another 2 while getting the boat ready to go. Living aboard is the plan with a shakedown to Alaska then shoving off for parts unknown.

DW
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Old 20-06-2010, 16:28   #5
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Does take time...

I looked for about two years and am currently over four years into fitting out. It turned into a much bigger project than I had expected. Also my abilities and needs have changed over that time frame.

Your two years looks to be pretty short unless you can find something in very, very good condition, or can afford more than a few skilled workers.

Allowing 3 months from first inspection to finalized transaction, 6 months to fix any faults and you are down to not much more than a year. Add in specialized training (radio license and courses for the crew alone can chew up 3 to 6 months), a month for initial provisioning, a little bit of bad weather and whoa, where does the time go...
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Old 20-06-2010, 17:04   #6
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I started with a criteria that I must have, then a a list of extras that would be nice. I spent alot of time on the net researching boats to find ones that met my criteria. Probably about 12 months.

Once I began looking seriously and physically boarded boats, I found there were not that many that met my requirements. The boats on offer would require serious time and money to get to a point for cruising.

I spent around 6 months looking for a boat and found it became hard work because none of the boats were suitable. It did give me alot of experience in what not to look for.

I eventually found a boat that was around 85% of what I was looking for and it has turned out to be better thought out than what I envisaged.

After purchase, I still spent 12 months doing minor upgrades and learning to handle the boat.

From that experience, 2 years seems to be a fair time frame to be ready to sail away.

Pete
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Old 21-06-2010, 17:14   #7
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1. Start now is fine, not like you haven't already, you were at the boat show. You are on CF and this is a great place to hang out! I realize you asked "in earnest", if that means inspecting vessels take your time. The vessel you find tomorrow may not be available when you are ready to pull the trigger. But, start now so that you can find the style, size, condition for the money that you may want.

2. That's up to you. I sold first then bought.

3. As a part time broker is Portland, I feel OK with tire kickers, so no real need to have a buyers broker unless you come across one you click with. Most vessels are available for "co-brokerage". This will be good if you find a broker you like and then find a boat that is not directly listed with that broker.

4. No comment, shop around, get referrals from friends and colleagues, visit the docks...

5. No personal experience with saildrive. I like prop walk

Good Luck,

Greg
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Old 21-06-2010, 17:44   #8
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I looked for 4 years before we bought our previous boat. Consider the fact that it may take 6+ months to refit a boat to your requirements before sailing off.
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Old 22-06-2010, 10:08   #9
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Well I'll tell you what ALWAYS seems to happen to me (and this applies to buying and selling boats, houses, cars, whatever, as well as looking for jobs and most everything else in life). If I decide that I should start looking now, even though I'm not immediately ready to pull the trigger, then I will discover "The One" almost immediately. If I wait until I'm ready before I start looking, then it will take me months and months to find what I really want.

So, when to start looking is up to you. How long it takes the "average" shopper to find a boat is really pretty irrelevant.

Good luck!
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Old 22-06-2010, 11:39   #10
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I think a lot depends on your personal knowledge. Like how much sailing have you done? On what boats? Do you know just where you want to go? Basics, Basics. If you are new to boats and cruising it might take you a lot longer to educate yourself (like do you believe the sailing mag adverts? I hope not!). If you are experienced make a list of boats you think would work for you and do your own research on the net. Yachtworld is a resource. Also do you believe a broker is like a used car salesman? You will learn to read between the lines on their sales pitches. Should not take a experienced boater more than a month to find his prize. Ken
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