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Old 21-07-2007, 16:09   #1
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Pocket/Coastal/Bluewater Cruisers....oh my!

Can anyone point me to a good definition of these? I see these terms tossed around at various websites, but when I google I can't seem to find a good definition. Thanks in advance.
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Old 21-07-2007, 18:26   #2
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Aloha CD,
Lots of different definitions but here are what I think they mean. Flicka is a great example of a pocket cruiser. Small but able to go anywhere safely. Google Flicka Sailboat. There are many others larger than Flicka that are also go anywhere pocket cruisers but smaller than a bluewater cruiser. Coastal Cruisers are lightly built boats for inland and coastal cruising as the name applies and include lots of the Catalina/Hunter/Coronado/Columbia/Beneteaus and other production boats. Bluewater cruisers are sturdily built boats to handle any weather crossing oceans. West Sail, Hans Christians, Swans, Hinkley, Island Packet and many more you'll see that are obviously well built ocean capable boats.
Hope this helps a little and I know you'll get more posts on this particular question.
JohnL
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Old 22-07-2007, 00:07   #3
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The terms tend to overlap some. No all blue water boats are as strong as others as well as Coastal boats.
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Old 22-07-2007, 00:25   #4
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pocket: small
cruiser: traveler

There is no authoritative definition of what a pocket cruiser is: some are built to be PCs; some become PCs by their use.

"Small" has a flexible definition. I've heard everything from a 15' West Wight Potter to a 24' Hunter referred to as a pocket cruiser. Never anything over this length. As the average length of cruiser has grown in the last generation (a function of higher expendable incomes and a proliferation of yachting equipment more than any other factors, imho), craft which would not have been considered small yesteryear now sometimes are referred to as PCs.

I disagree just a bit with John: though there are a few purpose-built craft designed "go anywhere," the idea that comes to (my) mind is of a small boat that has been equiped to take one or two crew on a "cruise" (and that term has a flexible definition as well), by the addition of gear and/or creature comforts that make it a feasable living platform for whatever trip one is contemplating. That may be a week of gunkholing or several hundred miles of coastal work. Unlike the Flicka, most are not bullet-proof designs and are suitable for inshore trips only.

The basic needs are sleep, food, and elimination. Many little yachts meet these needs, though those accomodations are as likely as not to be Spartan.

My bottom line: the way a small sailboat is put to use can qualify it as a pocket cruiser. It doesn't have to be a 20' Flicka or 22' Falmouth Cutter.
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Old 22-07-2007, 08:23   #5
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Ok, so let me ask this then...

Can a "Coastal Crusier" safely make a long passage? I expect to hear that the answer is yes...and that it mostly has to do with the skipper and experience of the crew...

But setting that aside for a moment, are production boats that classify themselves as Coastal Crusiers something that with time and experience someone could cross the pond with?

(This thread is mostly for discussion, as I have mentioned earlier I am 99.9% sure I am getting a NorSea 27.)
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Old 22-07-2007, 12:29   #6
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Aloha CD,
As you suspect, the answer is "yes." There are others who will respond that you should never take a coastal cruiser offshore but many have gone and many have made transatlantic or transpac cruises successfully. I have a friend who had a Tartan 27 with a shoal draft and centerboard. He reinforced his bow and hull with stiffeners and extra layers of glass in the appropriate places. He made it a go anywhere boat and did much in the way of channel crossings here in the islands. (Strong winds and very confused seas) I think your NorSea 27 is built a bit stronger than the Tartan 27 and will be able to take you anywhere you want to go provided you learn how to sail her properly.
Kind Regards,
JohnL
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Old 22-07-2007, 13:42   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado Dreamer
Can a "Coastal Crusier" safely make a long passage?
Yes. it mostly has to do with the skipper and experience of the crew...


Quote:
are production boats that classify themselves as Coastal Crusiers something that with time and experience someone could cross the pond with?
Depends what sort of "Coastal Cruiser" it is. To me the phrase is just a marketing phrase, not strictly related to a boat's actual capability. More a case that it's layout is designed to accomadate for shorter passages, usually moored of an evening safely and designed for a crew capacity that is more than would usually be taken along for an extended trip.

Also perhaps hull design is nowadays more adventurous (I am not sure if that is the word I am after?!) in that the sailing characteristics you can live with (and find fun) for an afternoon in exchange for a bit more speed / more accomadation is not always what you would want to live with on passage for a week, shorthanded.

Basically IMO some I would be happy to venture far with, others not. IMO Depends on build quality as well as design.

(BTW, I am not saying just because a boat is described as a "Coastal Cruiser" or is something I would not cross an ocean with is a BAD boat, it's horses for courses - a family of 5 on a "BenJenBav 30+ whatever" will probably have more fun coastal / vacation sailing than on a similar sized vessel designed and built to survive Cape Horn in a Force 27 )


Quote:
I am 99.9% sure I am getting a NorSea 27.)
When I Googled for the Norsea website the first photo I saw was this!



To me this is also a Coastal Cruiser, and not what I would recomend for transatlantic - but not to say someone hasn't / won't........

But the 27 does look nice, (and IMO with boats if it looks "right", it probably is!) I like the forward eating area / double berth - Although I do like centre cockpits I am not so sure about an aftcabin on a 27 footer.......have you been aboard one and tried if for size? - including disrobing!!

When I first saw the prices I scrolled down to the bottom, nearly had a heart attack until I realised $340k was for the 37 foot one!!.........but still, $145k is a lot of money! (to me)......but certainly seems like she is built like a brick outhouse.
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Old 22-07-2007, 22:04   #8
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Coastal cruiser crossing the pond? Not with my life depending on it. To many true blue water boats do not make it. Harbor hoping down to the Bahamas, Yes.

There is a lot of small blue water boats that can be fixed up for less than $ 70000. Why put your money in a Coastal Cruiser and risk your life?
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