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Old 14-01-2011, 08:32   #16
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Now I can not verifie this next statement but, I have heard it stated in boating circles that a number of the boats at the gardens are owned by one person who rents out to the less fortunate souls as cheap accomadation they do not call themselves tenants but caretakers. These people have little or no boating knowledge and the boats are bearly water worthy.
Simon, You are so right.
I rent room on my boat, in exchange for the OCCASIONAL sexual favour, to a woman who has next to no boating knowledge.
MY WIFE
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Old 14-01-2011, 16:50   #17
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Simon, You are so right.
I rent room on my boat, in exchange for the OCCASIONAL sexual favour, to a woman who has next to no boating knowledge.
MY WIFE

beautiful !!!!!!!!!!
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Old 14-01-2011, 16:55   #18
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Factor

My observations are from central qld and perhaps not accurate to highest degree but the point is City cats did manage their situation adequately without the loss of any of their many vessels by removing their vessels from the very well known threat.
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Old 14-01-2011, 17:24   #19
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There was adequate advance warning of serious flooding for anyone nearby to move their boats. Absentee owners have an excuse, locals don't IMO. And yes, many of the boats seen on the piles and up and down the river are not navigable which raises some ugly issues about the rights of folks to keep such things on the water where they endanger others as well as the environment. (I'll not be anchoring in the river in the future!).

On the other hand, the vessel that did the spectacular cartwheel looked to be in decent condition, had a functioning wind-gen and what looked like ok canvas. But I suppose it could have been undergoing a repower or something temporary -- who knows? I guess that it must have been holed (looked like a metal boat, Brent), 'cause it seemed to be sinking pretty fast. That sequence was a great demonstration of the power of flowing water, and of the silly things that a boat owner will do to try and save his craft.

All in all, a bad day on the river.

Incidentally, friends who live aboard at Rivergate were unharmed, and were loud in their praise of the construction and the staff of that establishment. Good to hear something positive!

Cheers,

Jim and Ann s/v Insatiable II, lying Towlers Bay, NSW, Oz (and glad to be here!!)
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Old 14-01-2011, 18:16   #20
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The way that boat sank makes the old standard "stay with the boat until you have to step up into the life raft" obsolete--looks like you need to be at least a mast height away from the sinking vessel when it becomes apparent that the vessel is lost. Once the water is above the scuppers there is no chance to reverse the sinking unless a very large mechanical pump is available very quickly--ie previous emergency efforts will have such pump going within seconds----In this case, the vessel was already going down despite all available pumping ---and those in the small boats didn't appear to have motor driven pumping gear they were trying to save the vessel with--and if they did it was too late--one could get killed with the way that mast and hull rotated--
I hope to never face that situation at sea but if I do--I will abandon ship to a safe distance before the final stage of sinking. I once faced that inland but we were able to supplement the bilge pumps with a bucket bail and an emergency extra bilge pump with a hose long enough to pump overboard from the bilge that I always carry--a call to the Coast Guard brought us a 4 inch engine driven pump 45 minutes later--our pumping and bailing efforts kept up with the inflow in a steady state until the pump arrived--once the water was pumped down with the CG pump we found the large hole water source that was not visable due to the water level. Once the hole was located, a t-shirt was stuffed into the hole from the outside and that reduced the water flow so that our bilge pumps could keep up--we saved the vessel but would not have been able to without the Coast Guard and the buckets. A simple mark on the bilge, engine or cabin wall after hole plugging efforts and all available pumping is working will indicate if your efforts will be successful--if you are going down despite your best efforts you must use the remaining time to gather your survival gear and safely abandon ship.
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Old 14-01-2011, 18:28   #21
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The way that boat sank makes the old standard "stay with the boat until you have to step up into the life raft" obsolete--looks like you need to be at least a mast height away from the sinking vessel when it becomes apparent that the vessel is lost. Once the water is above the scuppers there is no chance to reverse the sinking unless a very large mechanical pump is available very quickly--ie previous emergency efforts will have such pump going within seconds----In this case, the vessel was already going down despite all available pumping ---and those in the small boats didn't appear to have motor driven pumping gear they were trying to save the vessel with--and if they did it was too late--one could get killed with the way that mast and hull rotated--
I hope to never face that situation at sea but if I do--I will abandon ship to a safe distance before the final stage of sinking. I once faced that inland but we were able to supplement the bilge pumps with a bucket bail and an emergency extra bilge pump with a hose long enough to pump overboard from the bilge that I always carry--a call to the Coast Guard brought us a 4 inch engine driven pump 45 minutes later--our pumping and bailing efforts kept up with the inflow in a steady state until the pump arrived--once the water was pumped down with the CG pump we found the large hole water source that was not visable due to the water level. Once the hole was located, a t-shirt was stuffed into the hole from the outside and that reduced the water flow so that our bilge pumps could keep up--we saved the vessel but would not have been able to without the Coast Guard and the buckets. A simple mark on the bilge, engine or cabin wall after hole plugging efforts and all available pumping is working will indicate if your efforts will be successful--if you are going down despite your best efforts you must use the remaining time to gather your survival gear and safely abandon ship.
This is a much different situation to a sinking at sea - a shallow fast flowing river - when the stern of vessel hit bottom it was cartwheeled by the flow ( well in excess of 10 knots).

I recall one of the occupants on interview described how it hit the bottom of the river and he had to free himself from vessel before swimming to surface. Quite a different situation really.
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Old 24-01-2011, 16:13   #22
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seeing is believing

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Originally Posted by Ottis and Kim View Post
The way that boat sank makes the old standard "stay with the boat until you have to step up into the life raft" obsolete--looks like you need to be at least a mast height away from the sinking vessel when it becomes apparent that the vessel is lost. Once the water is above the scuppers there is no chance to reverse the sinking unless a very large mechanical pump is available very quickly--ie previous emergency efforts will have such pump going within seconds----In this case, the vessel was already going down despite all available pumping ---and those in the small boats didn't appear to have motor driven pumping gear they were trying to save the vessel with--and if they did it was too late--one could get killed with the way that mast and hull rotated--
I hope to never face that situation at sea but if I do--I will abandon ship to a safe distance before the final stage of sinking. I once faced that inland but we were able to supplement the bilge pumps with a bucket bail and an emergency extra bilge pump with a hose long enough to pump overboard from the bilge that I always carry--a call to the Coast Guard brought us a 4 inch engine driven pump 45 minutes later--our pumping and bailing efforts kept up with the inflow in a steady state until the pump arrived--once the water was pumped down with the CG pump we found the large hole water source that was not visable due to the water level. Once the hole was located, a t-shirt was stuffed into the hole from the outside and that reduced the water flow so that our bilge pumps could keep up--we saved the vessel but would not have been able to without the Coast Guard and the buckets. A simple mark on the bilge, engine or cabin wall after hole plugging efforts and all available pumping is working will indicate if your efforts will be successful--if you are going down despite your best efforts you must use the remaining time to gather your survival gear and safely abandon ship.
excellent u0tube at yacht sinking in brisbane flood 13 jan 2011 ,,this video shuould be reqiured viewing for those that want to grab that last bag of canned food or whatever,,video shows just how fast ballast sinks sailboat and rigging takes dingy on her way down,,lucky for them people were in proximity for rescue,,i put video into fav list for future ref if anyone disputes danger of rigging coming down on them if they dont"stand off" in their liferaft/dingy,,cheers
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Old 24-01-2011, 16:31   #23
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Seeing how she sunk is downright scary. That seemed far more fast and dangerous than I thought it would (or should) be. Dangerous enough on the Brisbane river, never mind in the middle of nowhere with nobody around.

Perhaps having a big block of lead in a boat is indeed an old-fashioned, outdated design concept? (and before anyone gets all upset and sentimental, I'm sitting on a floating block of lead right now).
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Old 26-01-2011, 17:30   #24
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brisbane river floods

Far from having adequate notice of the floods, the first that anyone in Brisbane was notified of any risk of severe flooding was lunchtime on Tuesday. By that time, they were releasing over 600 000 ML of water from Wivenhoe down the brisbane river, which is what caused the damage to boats and pontoons and the walkway. Not the flood, in fact one could say that far from mitigating any flood, Wivenhoe has made the damage from floods worse.

We are located at the Rivergate Marina and we live aboard. We were stuck here throughout the flood. On the Tuesday, there was a strong wind warning for SE 30-35K, ever tried to navigate through 14k tidal stream with an opposing 35k wind through the largest container port in Queensland, which was being evacuated so lots of ship movements.

We had decided to get out of the river on Wednesday morning, on the outgoing tide, however during the night, someone had managed to snag a 35ft yacht that was sinking and tie it up at the marina, right across the entry to our finger. So we were stuck there as it couldnt be moved. Eventually the line tying it on broke and it ended up sinking within the marina. It is still to be recovered. Another boat here did decide to leave on the Wednesday. He could run his engines for around 3 minutes before the mud and rubbish in the water caused them to overheat. Each time they needed to stop the engines they were in danger of being swept into the shore or other rubbish. they had a hell of a time and it took them 3 hours to get out of the river, approximately 6NM.

Notwithstanding the weather, at lunchtime on Tuesday, the river was running at 14k, measured by Rivergate Marina Staff and it is impossible to describe the flotsam (and submerged dangers as it turned out, as the boat in the video hit a submerged object and sank straight away) by that time. So in retrospect, it was already too late by Tuesday night unless you were a high powered motor boat.

Lots of boats made it out though and lots of strays were grabbed by the Port authority, water police, volunteers with large boats and of course the Tugs (Mavis and Co). Cant thank them enough, one guy here who runs a salvage operation, spent from lunch time on Tuesday until Wednesday night on the water pushing large objects and piers away from the marina so that they wouldnt damage other boats. They collected at least 30 boats and secured them so that they wouldnt be lost.

The citycat that was tied up at Rivergate was hit by some floating object on Wednesday afternoon and broke its lines. It was evacuated from the river because it couldnt go againt the current to tie up again.

So saying that people with boats had plenty of notice is not quite true. Conditions were already extremely difficult to navigate by the time the floods were notified. Maybe some sympthy would be good for these people who lost boats. Some of the boats most likely belong to people who have had houses destroyed, families put at risk and several days in an evacuation centre. What could they do?
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