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Old 18-03-2016, 14:25   #1
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Monohull vs MY/Trawler and Seasickness

Greetings everyone. I am 3 years away from retirement and beginning to consider my cruising options. I am afraid, however, that it may be all out the window. Every time I have been offshore fishing, like 2 days ago, I get really seasick. We were out on a 47 foot sport fishing boat in 5 footers and I was really ill. I have read the lengthy posts regarding seasickness on the forums here, but nothing has worked so far.

I have not been offshore in a sailboat, but I'm hoping the motion of a sailboat is significantly different, or less triggering of seasickness due to hull shape, ballast and the effect of wind in sails.

Does anyone have any comparing/contrasting experiences?

Thanks!
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Old 18-03-2016, 14:44   #2
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pirate Re: Monohull vs MY/Trawler and Seasickness

Reckon your best bet would be a MY and follow the Snow Goose trail in the ICW.. with maybe a hop across to the Bahama's in calm weather to cruise there..
Doubt a sail boat would do you any favours.. but why not hire a skipper and boat for a day trip to find out.. cannot see it being more than the cost of a Sports Fishing boat.
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Old 18-03-2016, 16:26   #3
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Re: Monohull vs MY/Trawler and Seasickness

Hi, there, yetii,

Lots of people get over seasickness after 3 days, the only problem being feeling sh*tty and keeping hydrated. With lots of practice, your body learns a few skills that help keep it from getting seasick, too.

I get seasick, and I have learned that stugeron, cinnarizine HCl, works best for me, but experimentation is how I came to find that out, and is one route you might try. Start with meclizine HCl, Bonine, which works for lots of people.

Now, Boatie's possibly right, that you will be among the 1-2% of people who never get over it. But that would be bad luck. So, the deal with monohulls is that they roll downwind. I am a monohull sailor. My body doesn't mind the roll, what it doesn't like is jerky motion. So, you, if you follow Boatie's advice, when you go for this putative daysail on a mono, ask to go upwind, having picked a day with 15-20 knots of breeze, and having taken the Bonine that morning after you get up, to give it time to work before you get to the marina. See what happens. You could repeat the exercise with a cat, their motion is quite different.

You said you read the previous threads, but the key to success is finally finding what works for you, and that can range from ginger through accupressure bands, and electric accupressure devices, to drugs including the scopalamine patches. Experimentation, mate, and you're the guinea pig.

Good luck with it.

Ann
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Old 18-03-2016, 16:33   #4
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Re: Monohull vs MY/Trawler and Seasickness

Just staying on land seems like your best bet. Think of all the tons of $$$ you will save. Keep trying more things before you retire. You have 3 years to figure it out. If you continue to get seasick just by an RV and stay on land. Still plenty of fun to be had on land.

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Old 18-03-2016, 17:01   #5
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Re: Monohull vs MY/Trawler and Seasickness

I have been on sailboats and on trawlers. I get more seasick and sooner on a trawler. This may have to do with the fact that on the sailing boat I am busy while on the trawler I am just sitting, watching.

I have watched a video of the Dashews trawler and it did not roll too much. I bet stabilisers help.

In any case, the movement of the boat is always there and you get used to it (or not). But rolling does make living on any boat from hard to impossible hence my standing advice is to get a boat that rolls least. A cat, e.g.

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Old 18-03-2016, 17:10   #6
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pirate Re: Monohull vs MY/Trawler and Seasickness

Try the Gemini's for size.. there's a few on the market..
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Old 18-03-2016, 17:21   #7
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Re: Monohull vs MY/Trawler and Seasickness

Nothing is prone to cause seasickness faster than a big sports fish. The V hull and lots of weight high up leads to a really rolly motion. 5' waves on a short period added to that and it's almost the perfect recipea. Try a similar sized sailboat with the canvas up and see how you do before making any decisions.

You can also try a catamaran if that doesn't work.
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Old 18-03-2016, 17:28   #8
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Re: Monohull vs MY/Trawler and Seasickness

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Nothing is prone to cause seasickness faster than a big sports fish. The V hull and lots of weight high up leads to a really rolly motion. 5' waves on a short period added to that and it's almost the perfect recipea. Try a similar sized sailboat with the canvas up and see how you do before making any decisions.

You can also try a catamaran if that doesn't work.
Exactly! we call em pukerboats for a reason. LOL, you can follow the chumline from port.
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Old 18-03-2016, 17:35   #9
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Monohull vs MY/Trawler and Seasickness

Long story short, in flight school I was getting very close to vomiting every flight, my instructor told me to take Dramamine and I'd get used to it, I had to sneak it as self medication would have gotten me thrown out.
I got used to it, and many years later retired after a career of flying, and still make my living that way.

You jumped into the deep end of the pool, without any acclimatization, and that would make anyone sick.
I had a rule with my Sortfishing boat, three ft was it, at three ft we stayed in the Marina, three ft and more, everyone got sick, and a bunch of sick people is no fun, a good way to ruin a weekend.

You do acclimatize to it, if you go slowly, I know I'm acclimatized when I close my eyes taking a shower and have to hold onto something to keep from falling down, it's an unusual feeling, but when that happens, my resistance to seasickness is much better.
But that takes a few days of being on the boat, nobody that I know of does well without slowly becoming acclimated to it.

On edit, I think Ann and I are saying the same thing, it takes days to get your sea legs, I think you need to spend a few days on a boat, starting at anchor of in a slip and after a few days go out, your body will become accustomed, but you have to give it time.


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Old 18-03-2016, 17:46   #10
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Monohull vs MY/Trawler and Seasickness

You spend enough time on a boat and get your sea legs, when you return to dry land, you will look like a drunk walking down the dock, you stagger. I don't know why this is, but I'm not the only one this happens to.


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Old 18-03-2016, 17:48   #11
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Re: Monohull vs MY/Trawler and Seasickness

Suggest you stay in protected waters as I do when on a small boat. Every time I exited the Golden Gate in a 30-ish-foot sailing boat, I became seasick. Haven't had the problem (although others have), however, on near-1000-foot-long ships even during hurricane weather (as in 50-foot waves). Smaller boats have a much quicker motion at sea than large ships.
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Old 18-03-2016, 17:49   #12
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Re: Monohull vs MY/Trawler and Seasickness

There is some evidence that people with really good balance get seasick more easily than those of us with crappy balance and who rely on external indicators instead. At least there is some good that comes of my bad balance.

"Spotting" is a coping mechanism for bad balance and can help you keep from getting seasick. It's where you keep a lookout at the horizon or a fixed object in the distance. It lets you know that what you feel (vertigo for example) is not real and you should not trust what your body is telling you.

You should have been trained about spotting in flight school. Practice it.

If you are anxious or angry you can set yourself up for seasickness as well. Be calm. Let things roll off you. No worries.

Good luck.


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Old 18-03-2016, 17:54   #13
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pirate Re: Monohull vs MY/Trawler and Seasickness

Quote:
Originally Posted by a64pilot View Post
You spend enough time on a boat and get your sea legs, when you return to dry land, you will look like a drunk walking down the dock, you stagger. I don't know why this is, but I'm not the only one this happens to.


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Get it right mate.. its a Rolling Gait.. that's why sailors drink rum.. so they can walk a straight line on deck..
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Old 18-03-2016, 17:54   #14
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Re: Monohull vs MY/Trawler and Seasickness

On sailboats, I just feel crappy sometimes, but don't get real seasickness.

Once went to (North) sea on an ex-fishing boat (something like this one) and pretty much lost the will to live. That was the real thing and it's horrible - and dangerous, as you stop caring about anything and everything.

Don't have much cat experience, but a guy I know recently went from mono to cat and ... got seasick for the first time, haha! Guess it takes a little getting used to a different motion.

Your best bet is probably to rent / charter the type of boat, or something close to it, before you decide to buy. But keep in mind that it can take a few days at sea to feel okay again.

NB: if you're talking about a boat more or less like this one then yeah, I can see why you'd get seasick on one of those. I would too probably.
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Old 18-03-2016, 17:59   #15
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Re: Monohull vs MY/Trawler and Seasickness

Oh I know about looking at the horizon, and never going below if you feel bad, worse thing you can do, and for some reason most people usually feel much better very quickly if they get into the water, I know that from diving, if you can talk a sick diver into getting in the water, they usually feel better, fast.
My daughter being the exception, she taught me that you can in fact throw up through a regulator, attracting a bunch of fish that saw that as a free lunch didn't help her much either.


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