Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 19-03-2016, 08:29   #16
Registered User
 
timbenner's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach, FL
Boat: Lagoon 380, 38', I Dream of Jeanne
Posts: 313
Images: 7
Re: Monohull vs MY/Trawler and Seasickness

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stumble View Post
Nothing is prone to cause seasickness faster than a big sports fish. The V hull and lots of weight high up leads to a really rolly motion. 5' waves on a short period added to that and it's almost the perfect recipea. Try a similar sized sailboat with the canvas up and see how you do before making any decisions.

You can also try a catamaran if that doesn't work.
Good advice! I have a 38' Lagoon cat that rarely makes me feel sick. My Business Partner has a 45' Cabo sport fish that always makes me feel sick. The difference is obviously the Cabo's narrow beam, huge engine weight down low, plus heavy fly bridge up top. The boat rocks and rolls 50 times more than by cat, with a 22' beam.

Solution: Try a cat and get the seasick watch they sell at West Marine. It gently shocks you right at your "seasick" pressure point, 3 finger widths up your arm, from your wrist. You can adjust the watches shock from 1 to 5. The wrist shocker really works for me, but then so does NOT DRINKING THE NIGHT BEFORE. HOWEVER, NOT DRINKING THE NIGHT BEFORE IS NOT A REASONABLE OPTION.
__________________

__________________
timbenner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-03-2016, 09:12   #17
Aspiring Voyager
 
SVTwilight's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Newport, RI USA
Boat: Tayana 51' FD-12
Posts: 247
Send a message via Skype™ to SVTwilight
Re: Monohull vs MY/Trawler and Seasickness

When you say nothing has worked so far, what have you tried?

For my money Bonine and Dramamine are only useful in light conditions. As soon as a gale blows up I get breakthrough. Plus the drowsiness and dry mouth from Dramamine caused me to stop using it.

Sturgeron is much better, but not available in the USA.

On a trip to the Antarctic Penninsula in 2007 on a 60m icebreaker we encountered a Force 9/10 for three days. A big boat suddenly became very, very small as waves hopped right over the foc'sle and broke on the bridge windows 50 feet up! I used sturgeron for the first 24 hours and when that started to break through I upped to the trusty scopalamine patch and that held for me until the storm tracked away to find others to torture. The scopalamine did cause wicked and exhausting hallucinogenic dreams though, or maybe that was the storm.

As stated, hydrate and don't drink alcohol the night before and as I learned many years ago, start taking the medicine the day before the trip. It seems to make a big difference, even on the large sportfishers we take out offshore for fishing and diving.

If all that doesn't work you could ask your Doc for a scrip for Promethazine, (scop is by scrip as well in the USA) but I have not needed to use anything that strong.

Good luck conquering the mal de mer. Don't let it keep you on the beach!
__________________

__________________
SVTwilight is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 19-03-2016, 09:28   #18
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Switzerland
Boat: Outbound 46 -Callisto
Posts: 149
Re: Monohull vs MY/Trawler and Seasickness

Careful with the Stugeron. I know many people swear by it, but there is a reason it has never been approved in the US. One recognized side effect is Drug Induced Parkinson's. This may or may not go away when you stop taking the drug. Most likely with higher doses, but why take the risk?
__________________
DMCantor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-03-2016, 10:32   #19
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Posts: 34
Re: Monohull vs MY/Trawler and Seasickness

Thanks everyone. I thought I replied 2hrs ago, but I don't see it. Ill respond more thoroughly when I get home.

Sent from my LGLS990 using Cruisers Sailing Forum mobile app
__________________
Yetii is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-03-2016, 10:40   #20
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Sequim, WA
Boat: Pacific Seacraft Dana 24
Posts: 165
Re: Monohull vs MY/Trawler and Seasickness

Used to dive and seasick on the boat out to the reefs then sick again back to shore. Once in the water ok, except for one time about 30ft down to the fish's delight.
Monohull Sailboats have a very different motion under sail and not nearly so bad as the bobbing motor boats.
__________________
Xthewater is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-03-2016, 11:26   #21
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Hailey, ID
Boat: Gulf 32 & Nimble 20
Posts: 348
Re: Monohull vs MY/Trawler and Seasickness

Don't discount the effect of diesel fumes either... Backing down on a big fish offshore will make anyone sea sick, going forward w/the wind with no engine running is completely different... When motoring we almost always keep a sail up just to dampen the potential roll, that helps too
__________________
basssears is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-03-2016, 11:52   #22
Senior Cruiser
 
Cheechako's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Skagit City, WA
Posts: 19,371
Re: Monohull vs MY/Trawler and Seasickness

Many people adapt after a while. But it can be hell. Some always get a little seasick for the first day. Rolling can be the worst and I would think a sailboat would be better than a trawler.
__________________
"I spent most of my money on Booze, Broads and Boats. The rest I wasted" - Elmore Leonard











Cheechako is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-03-2016, 12:03   #23
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 19
Images: 1
Re: Monohull vs MY/Trawler and Seasickness

There is no single remedy from sea sickness. People are different. Sometime it is psychological, sometime it is physical. I think it is more psychological than physical.

For example my sea sickness is caused by throat spasms similar to when you run fast up hill. I tried different medicines and patches - none of them worked. I get over sickness by quick throwing up ( I call it topping off) - sometime even before getting on the boat. Once I do it I am good for the rest of the trip or for a couple hours in heavy seas, then I repeat the procedure. This allow me to heat up and expand throat muscles.
My wife almost never ever get sick, but when she does she feels worse than me because she cannot throw up.

- It helps a lot if you stop thinking about it and get yourself busy on the boat. The more you think about it the more chance you get sick.
- Depends where you sit on the boat. On sail boat it is easier to get sick in the cabin because it rolls more down there and usually hotter.
- Some time it helps if you eat before and sometime it helps if you do not eat before.
- Drinking the night before does not help, but a little bit of beer or rum during helps because it allows to relax.
__________________
facciatosta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-03-2016, 12:26   #24
Moderator
 
a64pilot's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Albany Ga.
Boat: Island Packet 38
Posts: 17,068
Monohull vs MY/Trawler and Seasickness

Quote:
Originally Posted by basssears View Post
Don't discount the effect of diesel fumes either... Backing down on a big fish offshore will make anyone sea sick, going forward w/the wind with no engine running is completely different... When motoring we almost always keep a sail up just to dampen the potential roll, that helps too

Two years ago I motored almost the whole way from PC to Clearwater with about an 8 kts wind from directly behind, just barely enough to keep the Diesel exhaust in the boat and remove any trace of wind, it was in July, hottest I have been in a long while.
Yes, backing down on a fish is the one time your glad to have a gas boat


Sent from my iPad Pro using Cruisers Sailing Forum
__________________
a64pilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-03-2016, 12:32   #25
Registered User
 
tomfl's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Florida
Boat: Seawind 1000xl
Posts: 1,959
Images: 10
Re: Monohull vs MY/Trawler and Seasickness

Quote:
Originally Posted by timbenner View Post
SNIP

The wrist shocker really works for me, but then so does NOT DRINKING THE NIGHT BEFORE. HOWEVER, NOT DRINKING THE NIGHT BEFORE IS NOT A REASONABLE OPTION.
First time I am hearing about a wrist shocker, but I doubt I would try it.

Since I never drink alcohol that is not an issue with me.

The last time I was seasick I had driven from Tallahassee to Miami, parking my van in the airport parking lot and sleep in the van, getting up at 5:00AM, going through customs, flying to Cancun City, taking the fast boat to Isla Mujeres, slipping on the rain slick dock, getting to the hotel about 4:30, eating a big meal with the diving group, and getting up at 5:00AM to catch the dive boat to dive with whale sharks. The dive boat was a some what old sports fisherman. As I tell people who ask why I have a sailboat instead of a motor boat the vibration gives me a headache and the stench makes me nauseous.

The point is a lot of folks are probably getting seasick because of what happened before they got on the boat. Lack of sleep combined with a huge change of normal daily routine and excitement about a new adventure may well make folks more inclined to seasickness. Not to mention some folks self medicate with stuff that upsets their system.

My advice, as some have posted earlier, would be to ease into it. Get your boat on a ball or anchor in a well protected harbor. Sleep on the boat for at least a couple of days, hopefully more, and go out in calm weather for orientation trips. Eat a reasonable diet and don't get falling down drunk. In short don't do things that would make feel out of sorts if you were on land.

And get some ginger snaps from the dollar store.
__________________
tomfl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-03-2016, 12:36   #26
Moderator
 
a64pilot's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Albany Ga.
Boat: Island Packet 38
Posts: 17,068
Monohull vs MY/Trawler and Seasickness

Wife uses the electric watch shocker thing, and it works for her, better than Dramamine.
I don't care if it is the Placebo effect or not, only thing I don't like is you can't replace the batteries, you buy a new bracelet, haven't had to do that yet, as she gets used to the boat in a couple of days.
Of course there are copies that you can replace the batteries, but I've been told they are not as effective.
I keep ginger beer on the boat, it does seem to help


Sent from my iPad Pro using Cruisers Sailing Forum
__________________
a64pilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-03-2016, 12:46   #27
Senior Cruiser
 
Cheechako's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Skagit City, WA
Posts: 19,371
Re: Monohull vs MY/Trawler and Seasickness

I had an iron stomach forever. Never got sick in any conditions. Now that I'm old I've gotten sick a couple of times. My feeling is thinking about it or not makes no difference whatsoever.
Also, being down below where you cant focus on the horizon is bad, even though it is closer to t he CG and therefore less "rolly" down there.
I know people who cruised for a decade. Every time they went on passage she got sick for the first day.
__________________
"I spent most of my money on Booze, Broads and Boats. The rest I wasted" - Elmore Leonard











Cheechako is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-03-2016, 13:19   #28
Registered User
 
Rustic Charm's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Tasmania, Australia
Boat: Bieroc 36 foot Ketch
Posts: 4,898
Re: Monohull vs MY/Trawler and Seasickness

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yetii View Post
Greetings everyone. I am 3 years away from retirement and beginning to consider my cruising options. I am afraid, however, that it may be all out the window. Every time I have been offshore fishing, like 2 days ago, I get really seasick. We were out on a 47 foot sport fishing boat in 5 footers and I was really ill. I have read the lengthy posts regarding seasickness on the forums here, but nothing has worked so far.

I have not been offshore in a sailboat, but I'm hoping the motion of a sailboat is significantly different, or less triggering of seasickness due to hull shape, ballast and the effect of wind in sails.

Does anyone have any comparing/contrasting experiences?

Thanks!
Those who have mentioned the type of vessel are on the ball. My previous to sailing experience was on motor boats. They cant be compared to a sail boat. The motion in a mono hull with a deep keel is entirely different to a trawler or other common fishing vessels.

So, the first thing i suggest you do as you clearly dont own one and it sounds like you havnt experienced one, is to 'try' a sail boat. Or try a mulihull sail boat. The motion is different again. Try them and see if it helps.

You may be a person that will have severe sea sickness and even a few days wont help, or you have it to the point that its debilitating. If that's the case then sailing is perhaps not for you. But you need to find out and you cant discover that on trawlers or small fishing boats.
__________________
Rustic Charm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-03-2016, 15:54   #29
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 22
Re: Monohull vs MY/Trawler and Seasickness

From personal experience, I used to go on the head boats off the Jersey Coast starting in 6th grade and ending in 11th grade, usually 2-3 times each summer.......... got heaving sick every time & tried every remedy known in the mid-50's, including newspapers on the chest. Caught plenty of fish though...... Nothing worked...... my favorite at the Willow Grove amusement park was the roller coaster. could ride all day plus on the Cyclone in Coney Island. But - I could ride the ferris wheel anywhere. Bought 5 monohull sailboats from 32 - 40' and sailed over 25 years and got sick only once and that was caused from diesel fumes being sucked back into the cockpit due to adverse wind. That lasted 5 minutes. Go spend time on a boat you intend longterm sailing. Take small jaunts sailing and motoring in lots of directions and get used to how the boat works with the waves and the wind. anchor out every time and take a swim if warm enough. Get used to the boat. If you miss the throwing up, go to Coney Island for the Ferris Wheel or the parachute drop if it's still there. Don't take any meds for any procedure I've suggested and stay on deck while underway, especially standing in the cockpit at the wheel or tiller looking in all directions. Sickness originates because the brain can't figure out what's going on since it's so use to being on land. It needs you to stand with both feet and your head up looking around constantly. Your eyes watch the boat move into and with the water & when you're watching, the brain tells the rest of your body that this movement is OK. Meds will screw up this process. Use a bucket on deck if needed in the 1st 4 hours if #1 is necessary. Walk on deck fore & aft (1-Hand...). Stand at the bow forward of the unfurled genoa and look down at the bow where it meets the water. Before going below while underway, sit & stand in the companionway for at least 20 minutes allowing your brain and eyes and your feet to tell the rest of you what's going on from that point. That spot is closest to what goes on below decks. Down below, look out the ports on all sides....... There's more, but you'll get the point. And please don't participate in any conversations about being sick.... that's your history ... this will be your future.....
__________________
winjamerk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-03-2016, 17:10   #30
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: St Michaels, MD
Boat: Cal 46-3, 46' ketch
Posts: 190
Re: Monohull vs MY/Trawler and Seasickness

I'm one of the lucky ones that only rarely gets seasick... and usually it's a beamy powerboat (fishing) when it happens. However, because it has happened and I'm responsibile for everyone else aboard my own cruising sailboat, especially on Chesapeake Bay to Carribean non-stops, I keep an assortment of (in date) usual seasick meds aboard. I personally like the 'patch' already mentioned myself. It's the only one that will still work AFTER your already pretty far down I'd sea slope. But of course it works better when applied 12 hours or so before needed. I actually cut it in half which is plenty for me. As it wears off, you are slowly becoming acclimated and I've never needed even the second half no matter how bad it gets. Regarding boat selection, I'm a little biased toward ketches/ yawls for cruising for several reasons (extra mast for my amateur radio & back-up marine vhf antennas, back-up sail, easier/ more manageable sails, reduces auto-pilot use,...) but having a mizzen allows you to use the mizzensail as an adjustable 'parachute' to soften or just change the rhythm of roll on long runs without depowering/ changing the driving mainsail. Seasickness has two components... roll and duration of that agonizing slow roll. The mizzensail doesn't really contribute that much to speed, but I've learned that periodically changing its position and changing the period of the boat motion seems to greatly help those aboard avoid the onset of seasickness on 'smooth' days as well as rougher conditions. But as another post indicated, my experience has been that two/ three days of a s - l - o - w roll can also trigger just as bad sickness. Some sailors change course. I usually can change up the motion enough with the mizzen adjustment to not have to deviate from course.

FYI, while you are keenly aware of your own (deteriating) feelings, most guests/ crew don't want to reveal/ or even know that know they are having early symptoms. And talking about it can cause things to go faster downhill. So as Captain, it's good to learn to carefully but quietly observe your guests/ crew very early on. And keep them from the triggers in the early/ beginning of their sea time (looking down/ reading, being down below, leaning back/ laying down, too much alcohol, greasy food,...). Get them on the wheel and standing or busy doing safe standing topside tasks. Not only do you risk losing a valuable crew for a while, but one person getting sick is a catalyst for others!
__________________

__________________
W3GAC is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
hull, monohull, trawler

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Operationg Costs of ~50' Trawler or Trawler-Like Boat Sailing-Nut Powered Boats 23 31-08-2016 18:07
3 Non Sailors and Seasickness Charlie Health, Safety & Related Gear 32 10-11-2014 17:12
Wife and Seasickness jamiecrab General Sailing Forum 75 18-09-2012 15:40
Seasickness and Dogs . . . otherthan Families, Kids and Pets Afloat 20 15-04-2012 15:35
Motion Comfort and Chronic Seasickness sneuman Health, Safety & Related Gear 17 12-07-2011 10:08



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 00:56.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.