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Old 23-04-2019, 11:46   #46
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Re: MOB Recovery Technique

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Originally Posted by Dockhead View Post
You are right, in my opinion, about the grimness of this situation, and about getting them attached as being the main challenge.

....

I think a parbuckle or Galerider is probably your best chance in this situation; POSSIBLY if you can hang over the side and clip on to a harness.
What's your opinion on products like the MOB Lifesavers? It seems the best way to be able to make the connection to someone's harness. An accompanying product (think a short length of plastic tubing weighted with a chain) is intended to go under the person's knees to keep them more horizontal.

I see potential issues with getting the loop under someone's feet, and them still slipping out if unconscious. Also trailing a floating line has risks for turning props, since it would be in the water as soon as the vest inflates. Finally, it requires the PFD be equipped beforehand. But, it's the only good way I've seen to easily make a solid connection to a debilitated person in the water and doesn't require over-the-side gymnastics.

Another idea that's probably a bit less practical is to use a climber's stick-clip to attach a carabiner to a connection point on the PFD (lifting strop or other). You could just attach it to the end of your boat hook. I think it would be a bit harder than trying to hook a loop of line with an ordinary boat hook though.

(On a related note, one of the issues I read about with a parbuckle in testing was the tester reported not liking it trapping their arms and rolling them facedown close to the water. As long as they're out of the water that's less of a problem, but I think it means the sizing must be well-considered.)
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Old 23-04-2019, 11:48   #47
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Re: MOB Recovery Technique

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...Have you ever been lifted out in a Lifesling? I suggest trying it....

Yes, in fact I had my wife and daughter hoist me, separate times.


  • That is why I posted the photo re. keeping your elbows down.
  • It hurts. Quite a bit (so do harness). So you are temped to reach up, to carry some load... and then you can slip out. You have to accept the pain.
  • No, I do not think it is reliable unless the person is fairly functional.
If the person is wearing a harness with leg loops, I would make EVERY effort to clip that before hoisting. A wire gate climbing carabiner is faster than anything else.
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Old 23-04-2019, 13:05   #48
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Re: MOB Recovery Technique

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. . . Another idea that's probably a bit less practical is to use a climber's stick-clip to attach a carabiner to a connection point on the PFD (lifting strop or other). You could just attach it to the end of your boat hook. I think it would be a bit harder than trying to hook a loop of line with an ordinary boat hook though.. . .

That's something I never thought of, and sounds interesting. Might save a life.
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Old 23-04-2019, 18:56   #49
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Re: MOB Recovery Technique

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Originally Posted by psk125 View Post
I just ordered a "MOB Parbuckle Tarp" from my sailmaker. It will be a triangular poly/canvas tarp 6' on a side with webbing along the edges and SS rings at each corner. This is the right length to attach two corners to stanchion base supports on each side of our lifeline gate. The third corner gets passed around the victim and has a line attached that we'll run to one of the cabintop winches- which is pretty much in line with our lifeline gate. This will pull whatever is in the tarp up and easily over the toerail and onto the boat. Not having to deal with halyards makes the operation simpler. Using the winch directly guarantees sufficient power. The sailmaker suggested drain holes in the tarp, but we are waiting to try it out to see if they are necessary. When not being used for MOB's, we expect this tarp can serve as a possible sunshade and emergency crash/frothering mat. Gambell & Hunter is also putting velcro tabs along one edge so we can rig it as a steadying sail to keep us from yawing around at anchor. We hope not to have to use it for a victim, but we think it will be good to have.
Sounds like a good idea. Donít know about need for drain holes.
I particularly like the sise to fit stantions.
Ours are rectangular.
One reason we have the aluminum bar is to provide a bit of weight to sink the net down under the casualty. Requiring only the line to be held out board of the casualty.
The bar also provides a good place grab hold when pulled up by the line.
Hold bar in hands and stand up.
Will pull even a relatively large person up over the tube on a large rib.

Developed to reduce crew injuries. Particularly strains trying to recover MOB.
In addition to not wanting to put crew into water to recover MOB.
Simple and it works.
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Old 24-04-2019, 00:32   #50
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Re: MOB Recovery Technique

Itís great to see so many contributors to this discussion.
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Old 30-04-2019, 01:35   #51
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Re: MOB Recovery Technique

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...so we can rig it as a steadying sail to keep us from yawing around at anchor. We hope not to have to use it for a victim, but we think it will be good to have.
Now thatís a good idea. I was planning to sew up an anchoring sail with clips for the backstay. If I made the clips appropriately tough (bronze piston hanks) and the right spacing, it could clip to the toerail in seconds and be perfect for the old hauling/rolling out trick. Iíve never seen something designed to do both jobs but it wouldnít be hard to organise at all.
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