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Old 25-10-2012, 07:24   #16
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Re: Minimalist sailing . . . the boat

Well, to me the equation is quite simple: it is AND between the inputs:

1. a simple boat,
2. a quality boat.

= Buy a simple, quality boat.

Simplicity keeps outlay costs at minimum. Quality keeps future costs at minimum.

Our friend sailed the Atlantic loop in an IF. IFs can be gotten at below 5k. Plastic fantastic, strong, simple and fast. Arghh, yes - inexpensive too!

b.
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Old 25-10-2012, 07:56   #17
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Re: Minimalist sailing . . . the boat

Like most subjects, minimalist sailing has a lot to do with the sailor. One who can effect repairs on ALL his vessel's systems can expect to spend a whole lot less than someone who must rely on the kindness of strangers...

The simpler the boat and it's systems the easier it is to travel on a minimalist agenda.

I very confused as to why you equate a paid for boat with it nickel and dimeing the owner??
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Old 25-10-2012, 08:40   #18
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Re: Minimalist sailing . . . the boat

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Like most subjects, minimalist sailing has a lot to do with the sailor. One who can effect repairs on ALL his vessel's systems can expect to spend a whole lot less than someone who must rely on the kindness of strangers...

The simpler the boat and it's systems the easier it is to travel on a minimalist agenda.

I very confused as to why you equate a paid for boat with it nickel and dimeing the owner??

I got that immediately -- repairs.

My solution is bartering. There's a lot of non-technical stuff I can do on someone's boat even when I don't have extensive mechanical skills. Sanding and staining, for instance. Taping. Cleaning. I know how to be the bottom part of the team when someone is going up the mast and keep them safe. I helped a friend extensively with the old battered boat this summer, and he is now going to help me with my *very* peculiar water tank problem.

It won't pay for the parts, but often the thing that really shrinks your wallet isn't paying for the parts, but paying for the labor.
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Old 25-10-2012, 10:29   #19
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Re: Minimalist sailing . . . the boat

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Originally Posted by hesmysnowman View Post
Check out a video on Vimeo,com called Stand Fast. It is a fun documentary on minimalist sailing.
Tried to find it... there are dozens of "stand fast" videos on Vimeo, none of which have to do with sailing.... got a link?
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Old 25-10-2012, 11:21   #20
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Re: Minimalist sailing . . . the boat

A book I very highly recommend for anyone desiring the minimalist sailing lifestyle is "Sensible Cruising" by Don Casey and Lew Hackler.
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Old 25-10-2012, 11:31   #21
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Re: Minimalist sailing . . . the boat

I have read a books with similar titles by Francis Herreshoff and another by Larry and Lin Pardey. Both great books. They both said small is better and no engine required.
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Old 25-10-2012, 11:35   #22
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Re: Minimalist sailing . . . the boat

Two books by Lyn and Larry Pardey, "The Self Sufficient Sailor" and "The Cost Conscious Cruiser" are excellent reference books for people who want to do it without all the bells and whistles and without breaking the bank.
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Old 25-10-2012, 12:10   #23
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Re: Minimalist sailing . . . the boat

And a big boat, with an engine, can be minimalist too. Simplicity helps.

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Old 25-10-2012, 15:44   #24
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Re: Minimalist sailing . . . the boat

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And a big boat, with an engine, can be minimalist too. Simplicity helps.

b.
Indeed. Big is a subjective term, but I agree. We consider ourselves minimalists compared to many. No pressure water, no hot water, no refrigeration or air conditioning, no radar. As a matter of fact, would be just easier to list the simple things we DO have, because the don't have list is too long. But we wouldn't dream of going engineless. (Not on purpose anyway.)
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Old 25-10-2012, 17:02   #25
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Re: Minimalist sailing . . . the boat

One of the economic advantages of a smaller boat is that you can rerig the boat by buying a roll of SS wire and a nico press tool. I replaced all the wire on my Contessa 26 before I left and it was cheap and easy. Going with hand spliced galvanized rigging is cheap to start with , but will cost you more in wear and tear on your sails than you saved with the rigging. Just another 2 cents worth._____Grant.
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Old 25-10-2012, 17:03   #26
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Re: Minimalist sailing . . . the boat

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Indeed. Big is a subjective term, but I agree. We consider ourselves minimalists compared to many. No pressure water, no hot water, no refrigeration or air conditioning, no radar. As a matter of fact, would be just easier to list the simple things we DO have, because the don't have list is too long. But we wouldn't dream of going engineless. (Not on purpose anyway.)

I am a minimalist at heart, but I'm also relatively new to sailing. I'm not ready to go engine-less, and that was a BIG bite a year ago August when it was either give up the boat or give up the money for a new engine.

I don't have refrigeration and have been quite happy using ice. I have no problem skipping foods that have to be refrigerated while cruising, and the marina I live at supplies ice as part of my live-aboard fee. I go to the store every three days or so.

But I do live in Florida, and I do have a drop-in AC. I used it about 20 days this year. I store it in the back of the car in the summer and pull it out if I'm desperate, but I'm amazed at how well I have adjusted to mostly fans.

I don't see the point of not having water pressure even though I'm doing without it right now because of a water tank problem. Five-gallon plastic camping jugs sit over the sink and allow me to rinse my dishes well, but I will be solving the water tank problem.
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Old 25-10-2012, 17:46   #27
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Re: Minimalist sailing . . . the boat

Minimalist or simplicity? Any difference?


Most of what is posted here makes a lot of sense…


There is another parameter for minimalist/simplicity sailing long distance – the age of the skipper.

I did my minimalist thing for many years when I had a lot more hair and more muscles but less years. I then had to sell the boat.
Now I will still go simply, but will need at least an electric windlass and bigger winches. An engine I would never do without, and easy of maintenance is high priority.

One other important thing, the length of the boat over-all (LOA) is not as important as the waterline length.
My previous boat LOA was 30 feet, 26 waterline, 10.5 beam. Big boat! A large displacement boat will allow a larger water tank, and more storage, two important things to me.
Trying to find something similar to my previous boat, I have settled on a 33 feet boat, 24 waterline, long overhangs, lots of storage and still able to keep everything simple.
Go simple, go small, go now – go later too, but watch your limits.

Cheers
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Old 25-10-2012, 18:18   #28
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Re: Minimalist sailing . . . the boat

one can do this cheaply or one can do this intelligently. i found a decent formosa for not much dough, i knew the history of this boat, an di went for it and won--i am finding repairs and eating not mutually exclusive, AS LONG AS I AM NOT INSIDE USA....
hell, i can even eat in taboo restaurants and use a marina for storm season without dying of poverty. AND i can effect repairs , using someone else's hands, and remain within a limited income from disabiity.
anyone CAN do it--but, is the mind that is going to effect this successfully--gotta know where to get things, how to avoid retail pricing, as well as avoiding the retail plus 400 percent mark up due to labelling merchandise as marine...makes a huge difference when you KNOW what to look for and what to use and how to find it at small pricing.
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Old 25-10-2012, 18:25   #29
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Re: Minimalist sailing . . . the boat

The older 30'- 34' islanders fit that bill. My Islander 34 is 33' ish LOD, 10' beam, 25' waterline, 40' mast height 13' boom. People are always asking me is that a 28' as it looks smaller then it is.

Only really issues on mine is cockpit is too big and steering is twitchy due to rudder being ~12' back from center of motion, Turns quick though ;-)

Besides that its a simple low maintenance (for a boat) design. Led lighting and CCL in main cabin. Good tankage and storage for the size. Solid FRP hull and deck. (Deck has laminated wood backing but is not a sandwich). Its heavy for its water line length and easy to sail. No TV, water maker, water heater, stereo, etc.

Its not a fast boat but its not bad when the wind blows either. Easy to single hand too.
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Old 25-10-2012, 18:27   #30
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Re: Minimalist sailing . . . the boat

Are we talking minimalist or simplistic? They're not the same.

The minimum a sailboat needs is a set of sails, a well found hull and an anchor. Everything else moves towards simplistic and then passes that in to comfortable and finally to decadence.

A motor is convenience (yeah, I know, not at your marina. Columbus himself couldn't navigate to your slip without at least 9.8 hp). Electronics are also a convenience although I think Nelson would have sold his soul for a working radar unit.

Technology isn't bad and should be used where appropriate.

I have two cheap handheld GPS's but I'm also quite handy with a sextant, plotting a DR and even emergency navigation including things the Phonician's used to cross oceans. Why? The GPS is convenient and accurate. I use the sextant to corroborate the GPS ( and it makes me feel all nautically), and if the 2 GPS's fail, it's foggy and my chart blew away in a freak gust, it's nice to know that I can read waves to tell if I'm close to land and which direction it is.

I have a motor on my boat (well, you know, the whole Columbus thing) but I also have an 11' oar to row with and an oarlock on the back of my boat for sculling. I have also been know to sail to my slip with little danger to life or property (mainly because the f@#$&ing motor wouldn't work when I needed it most).

My water is from a gravity feed tank. I have an icebox and a butane stove. I have a potti-pottie but I'm thinking the "bucket and chuck it" method has some value (when was the last time you had to fix a bucket?)

I get to see the same sunsets as everyone else and I sail more often because I'm not waiting for parts for this that or the next thing.

Sailing for me is about sailing and all it's aspects including short tacking up rivers, learning the best anchoring methods for the seafloor you're on, reading the wind and weather, stars and waves, how to keep your boat moving in light air, etc.

Where is the challenge when you just flip on the motor because there isn't enough wind or it's easier to get to the slip?

I don't think I'm minimalist but the boat I have is simplistic (and comfortable).

Just sayin'
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