Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 19-04-2016, 21:10   #91
Moderator
 
JPA Cate's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: aboard, cruising in Australia
Boat: Sayer 46' Solent rig sloop
Posts: 10,718
Re: Loss of the RedSky

Good about the NtM, Mike.

Thanks for the warning about the fish traps, etc. It does make night time travel more difficult. But it's their living, we gotta share. Fair enough.

Since those are not continuously monitored, maybe they need a little gps that would broadcast an alarm when it's off position? or ais? The oil rigs have ais.

Ann
__________________

__________________
Ann, with Jim, aboard US s/v Insatiable II, in Oz, very long term cruisers
JPA Cate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-04-2016, 22:12   #92
Registered User
 
Moody Mike's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2014
Boat: Laurent Giles designed Carbineer 46
Posts: 139
Re: Loss of the RedSky

Even though the buoy that sank our boat had a gps it didn't work because.
(A) it was under water pulled down by the East Coast current .
Or
(B) They couldn't be bothered mounting a search.
Here's where it ended up after the mooring eventually separated.
A catch of a different kind | waverider buoy located | Narooma News
__________________

__________________
Moody Mike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-04-2016, 22:24   #93
Senior Cruiser
 
Jim Cate's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2008
Location: cruising SW Pacific
Boat: Jon Sayer 1-off 46 ft fract rig sloop strip plank in W Red Cedar
Posts: 11,468
Re: Loss of the RedSky

I think that one of the issues here is the use of very long Dyneema mooring pennants. if they part, or if the anchor drags into significantly shallower water, we are left with a long floating line, snaking about on the surface. This makes the likelihood of a vessel encountering and snagging the buoy far greater than if the pennant was chain or non-floating line. I further suspect that this is what happened in the Red Sky case. Apparently the buoy was still flashing when caught against the hull of Red Sky, as reported by the rescuing vessel (and in fact,if it was the same buoy, still flashing when it was recovered by the fishermen). this suggests to me that Red Sky initially encountered not the buoy itself (their lookout would likely have seen and avoided it), but rather the floating pennant, which became caught in their appendages and eventually dragged the buoy into contact. No proof of this, but it is a reasonable hypothesis IMO.

I certainly understand the desire to use Dyneema... I use it a lot myself, but this practice on the part of a Government backed enterprise is creating hazards to navigation and causing damage to innocent mariners. I wonder if a practical alternative is available, one besides finding the operator of the buoys liable for their consequent damage to others?

jim
__________________
Jim and Ann s/v Insatiable II , lying Port Cygnet, Tasmania once again
Jim Cate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-04-2016, 23:52   #94
Registered User
 
Moody Mike's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2014
Boat: Laurent Giles designed Carbineer 46
Posts: 139
Re: Loss of the RedSky

Your spot on Jim. See below a diagram supplied by Manly Hydraulics of their mooring system. Its as good a trap as you can get. In 3m seas with lightning , no radar reflecter impossible to see even with the brand new Raymarine digital Radar.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	image.jpg
Views:	94
Size:	270.3 KB
ID:	122874  
__________________
Moody Mike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20-04-2016, 00:07   #95
Registered User
 
Moody Mike's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2014
Boat: Laurent Giles designed Carbineer 46
Posts: 139
Re: Loss of the RedSky

This is my plot from my Ipad our back up nav using I Sailor, you can see when we entangeled then out of controll with rudder flopping about then after the rudder became totaly US using bow thruster to steer towards the ship. After the ships lines broke the first time we had to sail a 360 deg turn back to the ship as the main was now under water. Once in the lee of the ship things got very nasty as we came up under the British Loyalty's stern . A crew member with a very good arm managed to get a monkey fist to me & then the entitre crew dragged us back up along side to the pilots ladder.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	image.jpg
Views:	60
Size:	185.8 KB
ID:	122875  
__________________
Moody Mike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20-04-2016, 03:30   #96
Moderator
 
Dockhead's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Cowes (Winter), Baltic (Summer) (the boat!); somewhere in the air (me!)
Boat: Cutter-Rigged Moody 54
Posts: 19,757
Re: Loss of the RedSky

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moody Mike View Post
We have a new boat a Carbineer 46 in beautiful condition. I just sailed her up from Hobart to the Gold Coast with the help of a couple of mates. We have been cruising around Tasmania for the last 6 months including a trip to Port Davey a truly beautiful place. Were currently tied up at a freinds place in Sanctuary Cove while we help out our Daughter who is expecting soon. While the Carbineer is not as flash as the big Moody its probably a better boat for our needs. It has hydraulic in mast furling on both masts, A huge 180 hp Yanmar deisel engine and the deck salon layout is very bright & airy. We now have dual steering stations with a lovely sunny cockpit when the weather is good & a shed to retreat to when its cold, wet & uncomfortable. The reduced draft lets us get into places the Moody would not fit & the overall reduction in length makes her easier & cheaper to berth. We gave up on trying to recover our uninsured loss the laywers were the only ones getting anything from that. I could see myself becoming bitter & twisted seeking some sort of revenge but that would only ruin my health & be a waste of my time. Im now back doing what we always intened cruising & having fun. As for Manly Hydraulics they have been told by AMSA thst they must report their buoys when they go adrift & these reports should be turned into notice to mariners. Hopefully the method of mooring the buoys has been reviewd. The contractor who serviced the buoys at Byron , Balina sold his boat & buisness very quickly after the event.
On our trip North we came across another unmarked wave recorder buoy off Port Stephens we passed by with 100 m clearence but another yacht only missed it by a few meters it wasnt marked on paper or electronic charts. We also noticed that fishermen are setting trap lines all the way up the NSW coast in direct lines between Capes. We passed by dozens of tri buoyed fish trap lines thst are directly in the parth of a course if you are hugging the coast point to point.
I stuck to traveling by day only all the way up from Eden with our longest day 110 miles.there are some great spots to stay with pubs close by for meals , showers etc.
We hope to be heading up to Hamilton Island race week later this year and if you see us on board Katrina III drop by & say hi.
Dear Mike:

Kudos to you for your grit and determination, and getting back on the water despite everything!!

And in a Moody no less! The Carbineer is a beautiful vessel and I'm sure you'll be very happy with her. These are Laurent Giles "Gentleman's cruisers" which were just about the coolest cruising boats you could buy in those days, and were very expensive. They occupied the market niche which was later taken over by Oyster.

They are motor sailers, but good sailing ones so a bit of the best of both worlds. Some of them even had twin engines. It's a good formula -- sail in good conditions, but when the rest of us are bashing upwind you just crank up the machinery and go.

Happy cruising and best wishes.


By the way, your incident was one of the things which inspired me to finally get off my butt and set up a proper crash pump on my boat. I now have a massive 22,000 liters per hour trash pump, which weighs about 40kg and which discharges through a 3" fire hose, living in my bilge. It runs off 230v AC power. The generator (as you know) on the M54 lives well above the waterline so is a good power source for a large pump. The only thing left I have to do is to set up a switchover box on top of the generator to isolate the boat AC system to prevent any shorts in case of flooding, so that the generator feeds only the pump in case of emergency.
__________________

__________________
"Parce que je suis heureux en mer, et peut-Ítre pour sauver mon ame. . . "
Dockhead is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Power Loss in Tohatsu 5HP Outboard ssullivan Engines and Propulsion Systems 64 30-11-2015 14:17
RPM Loss Question ssullivan Engines and Propulsion Systems 9 04-06-2008 13:59
Loss of speed in C36 Starboat Propellers & Drive Systems 7 01-06-2007 01:26
A Grounding, Total Loss Jim H General Sailing Forum 14 24-12-2005 09:57
Instant Weight Loss GordMay Provisioning: Food & Drink 6 25-08-2005 01:34



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 20:23.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.