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Old 20-01-2007, 16:22   #196
Kai Nui
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Since Donna Lange was mentioned earlier here, I will mention an interesting residual effect. Since Ken's dismasting, Donna's site has had so many hits, they had to change servers. I guess the publicity helped someone besides Ken.
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Old 20-01-2007, 16:51   #197
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Trim50, Latidude38, Club69.....

I love Californians and fondly remember our first 2-3 years in Santa Barbara and the Channel Islands (San Miguel being our alltime favorite destination there) while getting Rivendel II and ourselves ready for longer passages. But what is it with you Californians and "numbers"? Is it that your grip on reality tends to get a bit wobbly at times and the number serves as a flopper stopper (another typical Californian invention)?

At any rate, the notion that any solo sailor would be "safer" by trying to stay awake at the wheel for several days at a time than by trying to go below and catch a few zzzs, while letting a properly set windvane steer, flies in the face of all commonsense understanding of the human body and mind. As a (maverick) MD by training, among other gainful (pre)-occupations, I can tell you that without any hesitation at all.

Another case of perhaps just being a wee bit out of touch with reality is the notion that any longdistance single-hander could make his or her life safer by looking for harbors to get a little rest. Most long-distance sailors I know get positively weak-kneed if they don't have enough searoom (with "enough" generally defined as well over 100 NM, especially on a lee shore). So, the whole idea of long-distance sailing by harbor hopping is just THAT.

You only have to go a few hundred NM down the West coast from where you are to start encountering the first of a veritable armada of aspiring long-distance cruisers (invariably equipped with teak-decked crab crushers) who got stranded on the Baja coast, in the Sea of Cortez or (for the most daring among them) the Mexican Gold Coast instead. Often it has taken them several years to even get THAT far. Now they are sitting in chicken harbor, their dreams of South pacific paradises slowly withering in the scorching Mexican sun.

Have fun

Flying Dutchman
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Old 20-01-2007, 16:59   #198
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Who carries harbor charts for the entire coast of Chile? Imagine trying to feel your way in without any decent charts... Kinda nuts..

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Old 20-01-2007, 17:00   #199
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Hmmm...don't recall saying anything about harbor hopping.

Once again, making assumptions about peoples experience based on their present location is a dangerous thing to do here. You're only asking to be slammed.

Numbers? WTF are you talking about???

My opinion of Hunter owners still stands.
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Old 20-01-2007, 17:18   #200
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Been reading about sailing under the autopilot. Just speaking of rough conditions and an autopilot. I had an ST7000, which seems to be a popular unit, on one of my boats. I just can't see a time I would leave the wheel in rough conditions. Unless it runs differently on a sailboat, the 36' downeast lobster boat could not be trusted to recover and she would wander all over the place.
I have a Raymarine ST8000 on my 40 ft. trawler. This boat is a double ender, no broad transom, with a deep keel. The worst this boat has seen is force 5 conditions on the stern quarter for around 24 hours. (I know this is mere child's play.) The boat tracked perfectly in these conditions, never touching the wheel once. Autopilots, in general, tend to work less well on broad transomed, small keel, semi displacement boats, in following seas. Often times, it IS different on a sailboat.

I always had someone at the helm station in force 5 conditions (or worse), even with a perfectly functioning autopilot, just to keep an eye on things.

I have no interest personally, in solo navigation.....two's company, three's a party!
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Old 20-01-2007, 17:57   #201
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Trim50

Where did I question your experience?
I know you once steered a vessel for 16 hours in bad weather. So it's clear you have that much experience at least. For the rest you have chosen to use an anonymous handle. For all I know you might be Bernard Moitessier himself.

I am just saying that your sense of reality seems a bit wobbly if you answer my question about Ken Barnes' options by suggesting that he put into port when he needs to rest.

As far as your "opinion of Hunter owners" I don't recall your having voiced one yet. No doubt you do have one, of course....

Apparently you don't like "having your chain yanked" that much yourself either

Have fun

Flying Dutchman
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Old 20-01-2007, 18:03   #202
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Ok, I give up. What's a "crab crusher"?
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Old 20-01-2007, 18:20   #203
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Google group search for "crab crusher"

"crab crusher" - Google Groups

Have fun!

Flying Dutchman
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Old 20-01-2007, 18:53   #204
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I am just saying that your sense of reality seems a bit wobbly if you answer my question about Ken Barnes' options by suggesting that he put into port when he needs to rest.
I'm sure the Chilean Coast Gaurd has a different opinion.
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Old 20-01-2007, 20:22   #205
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[quote=Trim50]Flying Dutchman,

..I told you what I have and would do based on experience. I would stay at the helm as long as necessary to get out of the storm or find a harbor.




Here's where we disagree. Let's assume a harbour is out of reach, you will be less safe on deck for long periods due to the risk of solid water taking you off the deck, or making bad decisions due to the inevitable fatigue. It is possible to attend to the boat so that it takes the attitude you want (without an autopilot which will not handle the conditions) then go below. The risk of major knockdown or a roll will increase slightly as will the risk of collision, but your overall level of safety will be much, much higher. If you roll you are below decks ( on deck in a roll and you are pretty much dead). In the southern ocean the chance of collision is miniscule.
If you run for harbour and try to make an unfamiliar entrance while befuddled by lack of sleep you are taking a big risk, not worth it.
If you are contemplating sailing in a bad area you need to learn the skills necessary to stop your boat and make it safe, you must have everything below decks bolted or screwed down, even a book flying across the cabin in a 360 becomes a lethal weapon, when the roll is caused by a wall of breaking water it is very fast, you are over and back before you have time to think, as well as which the wave may have carried you 10-15 boatlengths in a second or two, the acceleration and deceleration is so great that it is impossible to hold yourself steady, even down below, the only relatively safe position is in a quarter berth or under the table ( I think I already said that somewhere, time to shut up)
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Old 10-11-2009, 10:11   #206
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Wow, what a story.

So, what was the reason why the fishing boat that picked the skipper up and took him to land could not have just attached a line and towed the disabled yacht back as well?
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