Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 30-01-2011, 19:18   #16
Senior Cruiser
 
Jim Cate's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2008
Location: cruising SW Pacific
Boat: Jon Sayer 1-off 46 ft fract rig sloop strip plank in W Red Cedar
Posts: 11,440
Hmmm,

I noticed that essentially everyone who prefers a kayak to a dinghy is... a singlehander!

And some (not you, Zee) are young blokes as well.

There may be some useful data hidden there!

Cheers,

Jim
__________________

__________________
Jim and Ann s/v Insatiable II , lying Port Cygnet, Tasmania once again
Jim Cate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-01-2011, 20:03   #17
CF Adviser
 
Bash's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: sausalito
Boat: 14 meter sloop
Posts: 7,260
Quote:
Originally Posted by zeehag View Post
i have to laugh at everyone--i use a sit inside entry level flatwater kayak for my tender and have for 11 yrs.i love them i also have a walker bay8 ft---dont use it much at all. prefer the kayak-is only 38 pounds and is easily brought up and tied off to caprail..i can pack in it, i can play in it--is perfect for me. i live on board and use a mooring not a dock.
but do you tow the mothership with it?
__________________

__________________
cruising is entirely about showing up--in boat shoes.
Bash is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-03-2017, 13:51   #18
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 2
Re: Kayaks for Tenders ?

Like anything... it depends.

I have a small Walker Bay and though it holds more and could hold a passenger I find it unstable (swamped it once already and dumped my gear.) getting a passenger in it with me is a challenge and it won't really carry three people, forget about three and gear. I rowed out to the mooring the other night in a storm which sucked. Too much windage on the dinghy, no positive flotation if I swamped it (at night) and even partially covered it swamps with rain easily.

So a small dinghy may not be any better than a wide sit-on-top with some storage space.

Next, try a wide, stand-up fishing style, sit-on-top kayak. The wide center channel style are super stable and you can stand and paddle. It's self draining, less freeboard and windage, handles better in the storms and chop and is far more manuverable. Space for a cooler means space for a jerry can plus two large (40-60 liter) dry bags I can lash fore and aft. If things get really wobbly I can drag the dry bags in the water and still keep contents dry. Keep a pair of rain gear stuffed in the kayak's dry hatch for dry transport. The kayak is more maneuverable, more stable and won't sink or swamp if you dump it. If capsized you can re-enter, it won't drown at the dock or need bailing every few days like a dinghy and they take up less room at the dock. Plus they're faster to paddle and much more fun to paddle imho.

Now I still need the larger tender, but I'll be replacing the traditional hard dinghy with an inflatable, accordion floor type that can actually take 4-5 people and gear and a motor.

But get rid of the standard dinghy. The thought of another swim ina cold dark harbor with a submerged Walker Bay that doesn't float chills me. (Oh, and wear a lifejacket...)
__________________
Thesolidus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-03-2017, 14:20   #19
Moderator
 
Don C L's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Channel Islands, CA
Boat: 1962 Columbia 29 MK 1 #37
Posts: 4,367
Images: 34
Re: Kayaks for Tenders ?

I too will say it depends on the kayak. I have an inflatable with large tubes and a drop-stitch floor that is pretty rigid. It will carry 3 adults or 850 lbs, I can paddle it into a headwind, it is pretty rugged and rolls up into a manageable bundle. I have owned the range of dinghies and if you are not using an outboard, this is a good option. I have a Sea Eagle 420x explorer model, the largest one they make. You can get a kind of a sail for it too. I think i have a shot of it in one of my albums.
https://www.seaeagle.com/ExplorerKayaks/420X
__________________
Don C L is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 23-03-2017, 14:52   #20
Registered User
 
hafa's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 258
Re: Kayaks for Tenders ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Don C L View Post
You can get a kind of a sail for it too. I think i have a shot of it in one of my albums.
I have one of these on my Ocean Kayak Scupper Pro. Nice Gunther rig that stows on the deck. Goes upwind and tacks well. With a 20 knot wind, I've clocked 10 Knots on the GPS on a beam reach.

Dinghies and Kayaks are like trucks and cars. I use the Tacoma to haul furniture, not the Prius C, but I'd not use the Tacoma to pop down to the office.
__________________
hafa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-03-2017, 15:43   #21
Moderator
 
Don C L's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Channel Islands, CA
Boat: 1962 Columbia 29 MK 1 #37
Posts: 4,367
Images: 34
Re: Kayaks for Tenders ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thesolidus View Post
Like anything... it depends.

I have a small Walker Bay and though it holds more and could hold a passenger I find it unstable (swamped it once already and dumped my gear.) getting a passenger in it with me is a challenge and it won't really carry three people, forget about three and gear. I rowed out to the mooring the other night in a storm which sucked. Too much windage on the dinghy, no positive flotation if I swamped it (at night) and even partially covered it swamps with rain easily.

So a small dinghy may not be any better than a wide sit-on-top with some storage space.

Next, try a wide, stand-up fishing style, sit-on-top kayak. The wide center channel style are super stable and you can stand and paddle. It's self draining, less freeboard and windage, handles better in the storms and chop and is far more manuverable. Space for a cooler means space for a jerry can plus two large (40-60 liter) dry bags I can lash fore and aft. If things get really wobbly I can drag the dry bags in the water and still keep contents dry. Keep a pair of rain gear stuffed in the kayak's dry hatch for dry transport. The kayak is more maneuverable, more stable and won't sink or swamp if you dump it. If capsized you can re-enter, it won't drown at the dock or need bailing every few days like a dinghy and they take up less room at the dock. Plus they're faster to paddle and much more fun to paddle imho.

Now I still need the larger tender, but I'll be replacing the traditional hard dinghy with an inflatable, accordion floor type that can actually take 4-5 people and gear and a motor.

But get rid of the standard dinghy. The thought of another swim ina cold dark harbor with a submerged Walker Bay that doesn't float chills me. (Oh, and wear a lifejacket...)
Welcome aboard, Thesolidus!
__________________
Don C L is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 24-03-2017, 07:48   #22
Senior Cruiser
 
Scot McPherson's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Shoreline, CT and Portmouth Harbor
Boat: Standfast 33, building a 65 ft Wooden Schooner
Posts: 631
Re: Kayaks for Tenders ?

So I am a kayaker, and I am a part-time liveaboard. Here is my take on it.


Kayaks most certainly can be loaded up so long as you aren't loading it up with lead, and can be configured to keep stuff dry as well. The sit on top kayaks often have hatches to store stuff into the rotomolded body which is mostly water-proof (in the short term sense) and they have a cargo "basket" behind the seat. If for whatever reason you have difficulty keeping the interior dry, you can push 5 gallon buckets into the hatches and cover your gear. The only reason why your laundry would get wet on the back of the kayak is because you used a perforated laundry basket or bag. The answer there is simple...don't use those containers to carry stuff that needs to stay dry. There are expedition kayakers who carry everything they need to sleep and live off the land for weeks at a time with their kayak being their only storage, and that include winter expeditions in the far north. Inuits and eskimos used kayaks as their only mode of travel over the water for great distances, and for hunting whales, so if they can do it, so can you.


Now, regarding embarking and disembarking from your boat. Unless you have a swim platform, getting into and out of a kayak can be a real problem unless you are young and lithe, otherwise it's a struggle and you can make a mistake and smack your head against the hull of your boat because the kayak skateboarded out from under you.


Kayaking distances without a good backrest is going to be painful. Although I am a kayak fisherman and I do persevere for a few hours, after I have been in the kayak for an hour, my back is ready to give up and I have to take breaks lying backward for a few minutes.


Although using a kayak as a tender is certainly doable, it's not for me and its not for everyone. It's for the young and lithe, and the older folks who are still young and lithe. For those of us who are no longer the athletic younger selves we were, kayaks are not an option.
__________________
Captain Scot, 100 Ton Master, w/Sailing and Towing
Daring Kids to be Exceptional
http://americanseafarers.us
Scot McPherson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-03-2017, 08:51   #23
Registered User
 
UNCIVILIZED's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Up the mast, looking for clean wind.
Boat: Currently Shopping, & Heavily in LUST!
Posts: 5,629
Re: Kayaks for Tenders ?

Anyone ever play with one of the origami kayaks? I'm curious what they handle like. https://www.orukayak.com/
__________________

The Uncommon Thing, The Hard Thing, The Important Thing (in Life): Making Promises to Yourself, And Keeping Them.
UNCIVILIZED is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-03-2017, 09:45   #24
Registered User
 
Training Wheels's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Left coast.
Posts: 671
Re: Kayaks for Tenders ?

Me too!
__________________
Training Wheels is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-03-2017, 14:57   #25
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 2
Re: Kayaks for Tenders ?

I agree kayak isn't a replacement for a full size tender.
I will say though that I think it is better than the small sized, non inflatable rowboat type tender that so many of us (including me) start with.
My little tippy, non floating rowboat that sinks if it rains or splashes and only holds 1.5 to 2.5 people is far inferior to a wide fishing kayak. Standing on either is difficult but I find paddling is far less back breaking than rowing. And I've already swamped my Walker Bay and have previously pulled a neighbors swamped rowboat from the middle of the harbor. The new style of 'stand up kayaks' are so wide and have so much positive buoyancy they're hard to flip if you tried.
Both need muscle and limberness to use though. Boarding from my tender is precarious at best, from a kayak equally so.
That's why I'm moving toward a much larger, hard floor, inflatable with a motor.
For cruising I'd have to deflate it to fit it on deck but the added safety and capacity of an inflatable is worth it.
__________________

__________________
Thesolidus is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
For Trade: 2 Pelican Kayaks for Sailing Rowboat hummingway Classifieds Archive 0 21-01-2011 00:53
Tying of Tenders Jacothebrave General Sailing Forum 22 05-03-2010 13:16
Kayaks for Cruisers PHIL+MARYANNE Auxiliary Equipment & Dinghy 45 17-02-2010 11:21
For Sale: Two Necky Elaho Kayaks studzbearcat Classifieds Archive 1 03-10-2009 19:01



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 23:17.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.