Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 4 votes, 5.00 average. Display Modes
Old 08-06-2006, 12:36   #1
Registered User
 
Reed's Avatar

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Seattle
Posts: 22
Jacklines - how to?

I looked at a jackline at West Marine.
40' - Actual length about 80' with loops at both ends.
I would think I'd attach the loops at the bow and have a tear-drop shape
around the boat.
What's the best way to secure a jackline around the boat?
Thanks
__________________

__________________
Reed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2006, 14:02   #2
Registered User
 
Michaele's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Ronda Spain
Boat: Westerly Ocean 43
Posts: 39
They do need to be about the right length but even I can sew enough to make a secure loop... I have U Bolts in the cabin top close to the cockpit. That makes it easy to clip on the safety harness before you leave the security of the cockpit... Depending on the boat the strap should run flat on the side deck or cabin top so that it will not be tripped over.

At the bows of the boat you can either use U bolts again through the deck or possibly go to another secure point... solid bit of stainless...

Through the 'loops' in each end put a ss shackle possibly a bow one which is not too big but kind to the webbing. then shackle to the u bolts or fixings. Take of when you lay the boat up so that the sun/weather does not degrade the webbing...

Michael
__________________

__________________
Please visit my sailing website at
www.michaelbriant.com
if you have time...
Michaele is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2006, 14:25   #3
Registered User
 
Reed's Avatar

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Seattle
Posts: 22
Thanks Michaele !
I'll go get 3 Stainless Shackles.
Gary
__________________
Reed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2006, 14:59   #4
Registered User
 
jstevens's Avatar

Join Date: May 2006
Location: On board Sarah, currently lying in Jacksonville, FL
Boat: Pearson, 424, 42', Sarah
Posts: 546
Images: 4
Reed,
Are you sure the West Marine jacklines are 80' long? I use the 45' lines on my 42' ketch and they may be a little longer than 45' but not much. I use two, one on each side. If I read your post correctly you intend to use a single 80' jackline the runs from the bow down one deck, around the end of the cockpit and back up to the bow on the other side of the deck. It also sounds like you intend to secure it in the bow by slipping the loops over the bow mooring cleats. I'm sorry if I may have totally miss-interpreted your intended implementation, but this what is sounds like to me. I also assume your boat is something less than 40' on deck to make the single 80' jackline work.

First of all, I think Michael has described an excellent approach to securing the jacklines. However I use my bow and stern mooring cleats to secure the jacklines. That is only because I have not installed through-bolted padeyes on deck to accept the jacklines. The mooring cleats work fine, but it means I don't run the jacklines until after I leave the dock because they would interfere with the dock lines. On more than one occaision I left the dock for an overnight sail, and then forgot to run the jacklines until well after dark, when I needed them. So my recommendation is to follow Michael's recommendation, but if you don't, make setting up the jacklines a first priority, before setting sails.

Finally if the jackline you have purchased is really 80' and your boat is less than 40' on deck I recommend cutting it in half and running separate jacklines down each deck. It is trouble enough to step up two lines after departure, but running one clear around the boat is even more trouble.

Also, if you are starting from a clean slate on setting up jacklines. You might consider running one down the center line of the trunk cabin. My fellow P424 owner, Jack Tyler did this on his boat and I would have done the same except I have already put my liferaft in the way. Most times you go on deck you are hooked to the jackline on the deck you chose for your exit from the cockpit. No matter how much you tension the jackline, it will not prevent you from being thrown over the lifelines on the deck and then being hung up as a big, ugly yellow fishing lure on the side of the boat. The center line jackline might provide the necessary restraint to keep you from being thrown off the deck. The alternate solution (the one I use) is to exit the cockpit on the opposite deck from which I plan to work, then crawl over the cabin trunk to the other deck. At that time I am restrained from pitching overboard while attached to the boat, but it has a lot of shortcomings.

John
__________________
jstevens is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2006, 15:12   #5
Moderator Emeritus
 
GordMay's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 30,316
Images: 240
I’d agree with Michael & John that a centreline jackline is best, if practicable. I secured my custom made 1" or 1-1/4" flat nylon construction hoisting slings, with shackles to my perforated toe rails. I cannot remember the dollar figure, but recall that I considered them “cheap” at the time.
I wouldn't use mooring cleats, except as an interim temporary measure.
__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2006, 15:45   #6
Registered User
 
Reed's Avatar

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Seattle
Posts: 22
Hi John:
You may be correct on the lines length. I'll revisit that issue when I return to West Marine. I love your one Jackline down the middle of the boat. Less lines to walk or trip over. Thanks for all the info, I'll re-read the posts to be sure Iget this thing laid out corectly down the center of the boat.
Gary
__________________
Reed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2006, 16:16   #7
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Tasmania
Boat: VandeStadt IOR 40' - Insatiable
Posts: 2,317
Images: 91
Jackline securing is always a knotty problem.

On the one hand, if you have too many fixed points along the boat, you end up having to un-clip and r-clip your tether several times as you move around the boat. In the dark in rough conditions, un-clipping and re-clipping is dangerous.

On the other hand, if you don't have many fixed points, if you do cop a big green wave over the deck, you can get swept a long way down the deck before you fetch up against something (usually something hard) having collected every winch, cleat, stanchion and bollard on your journey down the boat.

I only fit jackstays when heading off-shore. I use 316 stainless braided cable (with a rigging screw to tension). I run from bow to stern with a fixed point at the shrouds and another at the main traveller. If the weather is seriousy bad, I use a second tether on my harness so that I always stay attached to a fixed point while transferring my main tether past the fixed point. The second tether is only about 3 foot long to prevent sphagetti-like entanglements.
__________________
Weyalan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2006, 20:24   #8
Registered User
 
Reed's Avatar

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Seattle
Posts: 22
Hi Weyalan:
Never really thought about fixed points along the way.
Thanks
__________________
Reed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2006, 21:35   #9
Registered User

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Rota, Spain
Boat: Sceptre 41
Posts: 59
Hi all,
It seems that jacklines would really be quite easy were it not for the ubiquitous dodger. The dodger frames aren't strong enough to take the shock loading of a jackline and yet they get in the way of a simple centerline jackline.
How about lifeline wire from the top of the cockpit coamings to deck centerline just forward of the dodger. These could be nicropressed with shackles for removal. Forward of the dodger, there is a transition to flat nylon jacklines on centerline. The wire jacklines would not droop down to deck level, but would follow around the dodger at coaming height (keeping them from being underfoot).
So one would have to reclip when transitioning from wire to nylon, but that is still pretty far aft and a stable part of the boat.
I'm just thinking out loud here. Further refinements welcomed.
Richard
S/V Saeta
Sceptre 41
__________________
Quijote is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2006, 22:41   #10
Senior Cruiser

Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 2,453
I sail with jacklines all the time. I run two. These jacklines are the 1" flat strap type with a quick connect snap shackle in the eye sewn in at one end. I have heavy duty cleats fore and aft on both sides. When I prep to get under way, I clip them in under the dock lines (sometimes I have to uncleat the dock line, attach, then re-cleat until I cast off), cross them over, fore of the main mast, and then run them down each side (on top of all other lines), to the aft cleats which I tie to with a bowline.

While these lines aren't TIGHT, they are snug. I have about 5 and 1/2 feet of freeboard and my tether stretches (shock reducing) to about 5 feet. I have two 5 feet long, bowline to bowline, lines that I attach to my midship cleats to help get back on board should I go over. I've thought about recrossing them through the center cockpit, but I have enough lines running about and don't need that mess. Also, with the dodger and CC, a centerline line doesn't work for me. In the cockpit, I have lots of options of what to clip off to. When leaving the cockpit, to the outboard deck, I can reach the jackline and clip in before I leave the cockpit.

This setup works for me and this boat. I would suggest that you use just a line or two, and try it on your boat before you go and invest in a production jackline.
__________________
S/V Elusive is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2006, 04:44   #11
Registered User
 
Sandero's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Southern Westchester/Northport LI
Boat: Shiva - Contest 36s
Posts: 4,213
Each boat and sailor will offer unique solutions to this issue.

Here is mine.
As an aft cockpit I have install strong pad eyes to the outside of the coclpit coaming well aft. The jack lines are attached with shackles to the pad eye and on the forward end to a slot in the slotted toe rail with another shackle forward of the bow cleat.

So going forward we clip on from the cockpit.

Another important feature is our harnesses have 2 tethers and there is no time when you are not connected to a jack line or other strong point.

A wave can not only sweep you overboard, but drive you aft... slamming into stanchions and shrouds etc. That hurts!

If your work foreward does not require that you move alot the second tether is attached, and in my case to a fixed point which acts as a "guy" and keeps you in place... so to speak... Two thethers add a lot of safety to the working on the deck in bad conditions. Having a slotted toe rail offers multiple attachment points and is very handy.

Jef
sv Shiva
Contest 36s
__________________
Sandero is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2006, 07:54   #12
Senior Cruiser
 
sneuman's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2003
Location: Puerto Rico
Boat: Tayana 37 Cutter
Posts: 3,149
Images: 37
I have first-hand experience with a jackline saving my sailing buddy's life - I watched as it strained and prevented him from going over the side in 40ft seas. So, I highly recommend them!

One really important thing: make sure they are terminated aft so that at the full extent of your tether you are not dragged beyond the transom. Otherwise, it will be impossible to self recover.
__________________
sneuman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2006, 10:54   #13
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 1,594
With a jackline setup with one end loop. Attach the loop to the forward mooring cleat, run along sidedeck and secure to the aft mooring cleat with the same method used for attaching anchor/mooring lines. Keep them taut. You don't want your foot to get under it and trip you.
__________________
rtbates is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-07-2014, 06:35   #14
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Annapolis Md
Boat: Pearson 424 42'
Posts: 6
Re: Jacklines - how to?

Quote:
Originally Posted by jstevens View Post
Reed,
Are you sure the West Marine jacklines are 80' long? I use the 45' lines on my 42' ketch and they may be a little longer than 45' but not much. I use two, one on each side. If I read your post correctly you intend to use a single 80' jackline the runs from the bow down one deck, around the end of the cockpit and back up to the bow on the other side of the deck. It also sounds like you intend to secure it in the bow by slipping the loops over the bow mooring cleats. I'm sorry if I may have totally miss-interpreted your intended implementation, but this what is sounds like to me. I also assume your boat is something less than 40' on deck to make the single 80' jackline work.

First of all, I think Michael has described an excellent approach to securing the jacklines. However I use my bow and stern mooring cleats to secure the jacklines. That is only because I have not installed through-bolted padeyes on deck to accept the jacklines. The mooring cleats work fine, but it means I don't run the jacklines until after I leave the dock because they would interfere with the dock lines. On more than one occaision I left the dock for an overnight sail, and then forgot to run the jacklines until well after dark, when I needed them. So my recommendation is to follow Michael's recommendation, but if you don't, make setting up the jacklines a first priority, before setting sails.

Finally if the jackline you have purchased is really 80' and your boat is less than 40' on deck I recommend cutting it in half and running separate jacklines down each deck. It is trouble enough to step up two lines after departure, but running one clear around the boat is even more trouble.

Also, if you are starting from a clean slate on setting up jacklines. You might consider running one down the center line of the trunk cabin. My fellow P424 owner, Jack Tyler did this on his boat and I would have done the same except I have already put my liferaft in the way. Most times you go on deck you are hooked to the jackline on the deck you chose for your exit from the cockpit. No matter how much you tension the jackline, it will not prevent you from being thrown over the lifelines on the deck and then being hung up as a big, ugly yellow fishing lure on the side of the boat. The center line jackline might provide the necessary restraint to keep you from being thrown off the deck. The alternate solution (the one I use) is to exit the cockpit on the opposite deck from which I plan to work, then crawl over the cabin trunk to the other deck. At that time I am restrained from pitching overboard while attached to the boat, but it has a lot of shortcomings.

John
Hi John,

I have a P424 also and am interested in how you attached on centerline and how you attached to that line when exiting. Any thoughts on tensioning?

Dave
__________________
Dbuettell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-07-2014, 22:11   #15
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Pacific Northwest
Boat: 1968 Alberg 30
Posts: 165
Re: Jacklines - how to?

Something else to consider - the singlehanded Transpac and I believe other offshore Pacific races require jack lines and fittings be 5000 # breaking strength. This requires truly massive deck hardware connections and webbing. I doubt if 1" webbing would meet the requirement, probably requires more like 1/4" x3" webbing. In any event, most hardware will,have a breaking strength stamped into the fitting, so usually is easy to vet, to determine which ones are strong enough.

I have no idea why the requirement is to stringent- someone said that 5000# is a minimum OSHA requirement for safety lines.
__________________

__________________
Glenn.Brooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
Jacklines

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 02:13.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.