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Old 29-04-2016, 09:17   #61
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Re: Is Teak Decks a deal breaker for you

yes, deal breaker
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Old 29-04-2016, 11:34   #62
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Re: Is Teak Decks a deal breaker for you

I haven't checked the many posts on this subject, but I`m guessing it`s about a 50/50 split for or against teak decks.
Fine, that's to be expected, but why do some folk feel they have to slag those having the opposite opinion?
I like the teak deck I had installed on my boat for its aesthetic beauty. As well, I bask in the many compliments I receive from very obviously envious`fellow sailors who walk the dock.
Yes, I`m very proud of my little coastal cruiser`s good looks, even though I did not install the deck myself ... but I do not slag other sailors for NOT having a teak deck. There`s probably a million reasons many do not have them, not the least of which might be the cost, and the fact that they cannot afford them. They are after all NOT CHEAP to install.
As for what they are like in the tropics, I would not know, neither will I ever know but I see some of you say teak is no good in the tropics and another says its just fine if you give them a salt water rinse to cool the boat off.
So it would appear that `knowledge`, or the lack of it, is the all important thing when it comes to ownership ... and this probably applies to most things on a boat.
In conclusion, let me say: Enjoy your boat whether you have teak or glass decks. Beauty is as they say, in the eye of the beholder.
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Old 29-04-2016, 14:32   #63
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Re: Is Teak Decks a deal breaker for you

I do not own a boat, but have been looking/dreaming on alot of sites..I had read all of these opinions before so I have considered teak a deal breaker and discounted those boats from the get-go. BUT, now looking at this thread I am thinking that maybe I am wrong to do so. I do love the look of teak..wood decks are so much more attractive that non-skid, awlgrip, etc. A nice looking boat is a true thing of beauty..the old Cheoy Lees, Cape Dorys, etc. are a dream to me..I don't want to do a lot of work maintaining, but if it is just a bit of work here and there I'd gladly do it for the beauty of a boat like that.
I guess the part that would scare me is that I will most likely end up with an old boat due to financial reasons and teak decks that may have been neglected for 30+ years would be scary..last thing I want to do is spend everything I have and immediately be hit with a massive replacement job.
Just my 0.02
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Old 29-04-2016, 14:49   #64
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Re: Is Teak Decks a deal breaker for you

Good news is that its easy to figure out if the teak decks are worn out or not. Look at them, walk on them, inspect the caulking. Any lifted sections, exposed bung holes, a lot of flexing when walking, and voids in the caulking would indicate lack of care, or just old fashion abuse.

If the teak is worn down to a thin layer, then just put a non skid rubberized mats on top of them. There are glues that will adhere to the caulking so the mats will stay put. Avoids ripping apart the deck.

Also learn how the boat was constructed. Cheoy Lees imbedded their glass decks with channelized strips of teak or mahogany for stiffness then laid their teak on top of this. So the decks will be stiff with or without the teak. A bit different with HC boats but same end result. Since the teak decks were cosmetic, they were not integral to the structural integrity of the boat. Good luck. Go with your heart and enjoy the consequences.
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Old 29-04-2016, 16:50   #65
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Re: Is Teak Decks a deal breaker for you

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sailorbob8599 View Post
I haven't checked the many posts on this subject, but I`m guessing it`s about a 50/50 split for or against teak decks.
Fine, that's to be expected, but why do some folk feel they have to slag those having the opposite opinion?
I like the teak deck I had installed on my boat for its aesthetic beauty. As well, I bask in the many compliments I receive from very obviously envious`fellow sailors who walk the dock.
Yes, I`m very proud of my little coastal cruiser`s good looks, even though I did not install the deck myself ... but I do not slag other sailors for NOT having a teak deck. There`s probably a million reasons many do not have them, not the least of which might be the cost, and the fact that they cannot afford them. They are after all NOT CHEAP to install.
As for what they are like in the tropics, I would not know, neither will I ever know but I see some of you say teak is no good in the tropics and another says its just fine if you give them a salt water rinse to cool the boat off.
So it would appear that `knowledge`, or the lack of it, is the all important thing when it comes to ownership ... and this probably applies to most things on a boat.
In conclusion, let me say: Enjoy your boat whether you have teak or glass decks. Beauty is as they say, in the eye of the beholder.
I think is a lot more accurate to say personal preference is the all important thing. If you say it is "knowledge" that's kind of like slagging off all the people who don't want team decks because they are ignorant. I have sailed on boats with teak decks. They are way too hot underfoot for me, and the cabins were noticeably hotter. It is possible for people to know something is not for them without buying a boat and living with it. I would bet everyone who has offered their negative opinion about team decks has either watched someone deal with taking them off, in reality or virtually, viewed boats with teak decks in their boat shopping and noted their properties, or has sailed on someone else's boat with teak decks.

The interesting question posed by someone above is whether other features could outweigh teak decks in a purchase decision. Hadn't thought about that. For me now, no. But if I was living aboard and moving the boat out of the hot weather, some features would make me overlook teak decks. It's a great way of looking at all undesirable features.
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Old 29-04-2016, 18:04   #66
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Re: Is Teak Decks a deal breaker for you

Would not even look at a used boat with teak decks if it was more than 15 years old. As Jim C mentioned the newer boats that glue the teak down are often using thinner teak. Teak comes in many different grades and the boats that really lasted were covered with thicker old growth teak but these days much of it is plantation grown and it just doesn't last as long. They are pretty to the eye though, no question there.
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Old 29-04-2016, 18:50   #67
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Re: Is Teak Decks a deal breaker for you

If I were to use a timber deck it would not necessarily be teak. Teak was used because it absorbs little water as compared to other timbers which swell excessively, and because it is an oily timber it does not glue easily. However, if the area to be glued is heated and swabbed with methylated spirit to remove excess oil, then heat-dried out with a hot air blower, resorcinol will fasten it to a frame if it is properly clamped.

Other solvents are possibly better at dissolving excess oil from the fibres of the teak--but are more difficult to expel from the timber. It all depends on how much time you wish to spend replacing the rotten bits--or fit new pieces.

My personal preference for decking is not timber. However--there are other timbers which serve the purpose as well or better than teak--and may in fact be cheaper.

White Beech would be one of them--but it is hard to get these days. It will accept epoxy glue--I still prefer resorcinol for decks--Resorcinol is heat and water resistant but has to be clamped and has little or no filling properties.

So--is a teak deck a deal breaker? That depends on who fitted it in the first place and what pains they went to in securing it. These days the traditional driven oakum and pitch cooked into the spaces has been replaced by other sealers.

I always thought that wooden decks, if they were not leaking, were about to do so. Movement of the ship in a severe storm can put a great deal of strain on decking--and its natural elasticity plus its caulking should cover any movement or "give" they have. If not--you will get leaks.

So for me they probably are a deal breaker--unless the cost of an entire deck replacement is allowed for in the asking price.
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Old 02-05-2016, 00:28   #68
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Re: Is Teak Decks a deal breaker for you

The discussion on this topic has been quite informative and the posters respectful of others opinions - a nice bar to maintain. All that I would like to add is that this issue is basically about personal taste and aesthetics;for me it's no teak decks for reasons that have already been discussed, however I'd be a hypocrite to come down on those who prefer them. Why,because I have dark blue topsides, not really a PRACTICAL colour,but I think it's beautiful,makes me smile when I walk to the boat to see the mirror like reflection of the surroundings. I pay a price for this in time, labour and more,it's not tangible it's visceral, nor is it arguable as if my tastes are superior to yours - that goes nowhere. So,deal breaker, I don't know. A boat isn't a practical investment, unless for commercial purposes, it's a pleasure craft,if teak decks are high on your pleasure scale go for it,just know what's involved, there's much good info in this thread.
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Old 02-05-2016, 01:20   #69
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Re: Is Teak Decks a deal breaker for you

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Originally Posted by Mike Banks View Post
I always thought that wooden decks, if they were not leaking, were about to do so. Movement of the ship in a severe storm can put a great deal of strain on decking--and its natural elasticity plus its caulking should cover any movement or "give" they have. If not--you will get leaks.

So for me they probably are a deal breaker--unless the cost of an entire deck replacement is allowed for in the asking price.
I assume you are referring to wooden boats with timber decks laid with teak planking, not modern boats with impervious fibreglass decks with teak fixed on top, where whether you ripped the teak up or not, they cannot leak?
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Old 02-05-2016, 08:23   #70
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Re: Is Teak Decks a deal breaker for you

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Are you saying your boat has 1" thick solid glass decks? No core? Are you sure? My gut says you need to look into that further. Never heard of that. But then, I don't know everything!
Hi Cheechako,

I just noticed your question... [I'm not sure why I don't always receive an email on threads I'm subscribed to...]

I know it is somewhat unusual for a boat to lack coring in the deck and sometimes elsewhere, but yes, I'm absolutely sure. Not only is that the factory specification, but I have drilled some holes to mount a new anchor windlass and a few additional vents...

This is the first vessel [of 3] of this size I have owned that didn't have coring in the deck. Both my Tayana 47 and Valiant Esprit 37 [both Bob Perry designs] had balsa cored decks, so I am intimately familiar with them...

I have always dated and labeled core samples when I drill using a hole saw on my boats for future reference. The thickness in the areas I have drilled so far [and I hope I'm done making holes] has varied from 13/16 to 1-1/16 inch.

I haven't drilled a hole through the pilothouse roof yet, and I suspect that is somewhat thinner [subjectively from sounding with a mallet...]

The hull is similarly constructed, and even thicker in some areas.

There is no coring anywhere. [Per specs, and none encountered nor sounded thus far.]

Since this particular vessel was ordered from the factory without teak decks, I don't know if the deck has made a different thickness from those with factory installed teak. I have read, but have no personal confirmation, that at the time the factory screwed down the teak, ground off the protruding screw points inside the cabin, and then glassed over the underside of the deck to seal those screw holes and prevent future leaks... Therefore I am speculating this deck may have been made thicker to offset the lack of teak and that additional layer of glass, but that is pure speculation on my part... I am not the original owner and don't have the original order paperwork.

The solid fiberglass is certainly a contribution to our 22 ton cruising weight...

Cheers!

Bill
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Old 03-05-2016, 01:27   #71
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Re: Is Teak Decks a deal breaker for you

I just can't bring myself to do it, no matter how much I like the boat, for me, the cons out way the pros by a wide margin, I really like the way they look though, one thing about ripping the teak out and glassing the decks yourself, and your competent at it, you know that you've done a good job, problem is the price never is such that allows that work, at least that's what I've found, if I find an owner that takes it into consideration then I might tackle the job, I said might, think I'll be patient
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