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Old 31-08-2012, 09:12   #16
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Re: Impact of Storms on Boats in Marinas

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Originally Posted by S/V Illusion View Post
to what did you tie the docklines, cleats??????

Cleats, piles, piers, whatever you can find that won't chafe your line to pieces. On our docks we have finger piers and a main pier that both have cleats and then the piles themselves.
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Old 31-08-2012, 09:23   #17
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Re: Impact of Storms on Boats in Marinas

I will speak for my marina. A week out from Hurricane Isaac, the Marina mgmt pulled the trigger and started hauling out boats. The schedule called for 600am - 900pm Haulouts for 3 days in a row. Average haulout time was an hour per boat. They had one lift. The Dock Master required ALL boats to leave the marina. All boats were put on blocks and chained stands.

My boat faired well.

I would NOT want my boat in the water even during a tropical storm. Not because of my ability to maintain my boat but because of the knuckheads around me that dont secure their boats adequately.

Most marinas will force all boats out. In my opinion the best place is out of the water.

Insurance paid for 50% of haul out cost.
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Old 01-09-2012, 07:09   #18
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Re: Impact of Storms on Boats in Marinas

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Originally Posted by Srah 1953 View Post
Can I ask, as someone who has dreamed to moving somewhere warm like Florida, what impact/damage do boats suffer in marinas in places like Florida when storms, etc, pass through. Not specifically in relation to Isaac but just generally.
Many thanks

Here on the Tampa Bay gulf coast we had virtually no damage from Isaac, a little bit for a few people,isolated incidents due to lack of preparation for Debby. We haven't been directly hit by a hurricane in over 80 years.

Nonetheless it theoretically could happen.

Can you name some part of the country where you could sail that wouldn't face the potential for natural disasters? Take a look at Washington state and their vulnerability to earthquake, volcano AND tsunamai.Hasn't happened yet but someday at least one of them will.

Etc.

In Fla, Tampa Bay area is the safest from hurricanes. We don't know why. Isaac had us in his bullseye and turned. Charley came even closer and turned.
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Old 01-09-2012, 07:12   #19
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Re: Impact of storms on boats in marinas

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A marina or dock can be the worst place for a boat during a hurricane. The best choice is to prearrange a haulout in case of a storm prediction. The boat, and other boats beside in the yard, should be anchored to the ground...not just propped up on stands. Take off anything you can that adds windage (sails, biminis) and remove electronics and anything of value that you can.If you decide to keep it at a dock, double up your lines and make them as long as you possibly can to allow for storm surge...tie them high on the piers with something to keep them from slipping off. Floating docks are even better for surge, as long as the pilings are tall enough to accommodate the max surge expected. We have a secret anchoring spot with great all around protection and tie her to trees and pilings with 8 lines, plus 2 anchors. Last TS it sat there like nothing was happening...a 45' land shelf rises just to the north...that's where the most damaging winds often come from.

In my marina, they close it to boat traffic at 35 mph and then we are free to move our boats at least partially out of the slip, so we can add longer lines -- lines that even cross the marina to the other side -- and spider web them. How well the marina is run is crucial. It's also pretty sheltered from the worst of wind and wave.

If you have a monster storm surge there is no protection, period, but ... check out Tampa Bay area's record.
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Old 01-09-2012, 07:13   #20
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Re: Impact of storms on boats in marinas

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Originally Posted by S/V Illusion View Post
Perceptions are interesting... Having lived and owned boats in New England and now in Florida, the storms we experienced in New England were FAR worse than anything here in Florida including two hurricanes. I've seen severe damage to marinas and boats in New England from typical winter storms that dwarfs anything here in Florida.

By all means, move to Florida; it's safer and the weather isn't too bad...

Oh yeah -- and just look up what little Hurricane Bob did when it came in to New England ...
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Old 01-09-2012, 07:14   #21
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Re: Impact of storms on boats in marinas

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You probably couldn't say that IF you'd been around when Andrew hit..

JUST WAIT..

Andrew was a freak, but Wilma was not, and she did a LOT of damage in s. Florida. The hurricane risk in "most" of Florida is very real.

It could happen here but it's very rare here.
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Old 01-09-2012, 07:15   #22
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Re: Impact of storms on boats in marinas

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Is the "norm" now for marinas in the path of a major storm to MANDATE all vessels leave their slips?

Not where I am. The only rule my marina has is that 1) move it before the winds get to 35 mph if you're going to move and 2) the dockmaster can retie your boat whether you want him to or not. He is thinking of the marina structure and the other boats, not just yours.

But it's well sheltered and there are a number of things you can do here to lower the risk of damage.
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Old 01-09-2012, 07:19   #23
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Re: Impact of storms on boats in marinas

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Originally Posted by S/V Illusion View Post
There are exceptions to any generality. I could argue the damage done by the hurricanes which hit New England and Long Island over the past century were worse than Andrew's impact but that too would be a generality.

The point being most people have a misperception about the real chances of a damaging hurricane in Florida just as they do about an earthquake destroying California.

The risk of severe earthquake in CA is very real, but the shock waves don't carry far there because of the substructure of the earth there.

Memphis to St. Louis is an entirely different story. There the substructure allows shock waves to travel very long distances, and there's a very serious fault more or less between the two cities. Not if, but when it happens again, both cities will make NO after Katrina look like an easy day. Last time it happened here the shock waves traveled all the way to Boston and made the church bells swing and ring.

Both cities are in enough denial that they aren't taking much in the way of the proactive steps CA has taken, retrofitting buildings and bridges, etc.

I'd much rather face a hurricane. Lots of time to decide what to do and where to go.
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Old 01-09-2012, 07:21   #24
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Re: Impact of Storms on Boats in Marinas

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Originally Posted by S/V Illusion View Post
to what did you tie the docklines, cleats??????

That can work if you can move the boat far enough away from them. In my marina, everyone can move their boat out enough to use opposite-side pilings or mangroves.

Monster storms, not much you can do, but there's a lot you can do, and seawall cleats don't have to be a killer.
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Old 01-09-2012, 08:58   #25
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Re: Impact of Storms on Boats in Marinas

Quote:
Originally Posted by Srah 1953 View Post
Can I ask, as someone who has dreamed to moving somewhere warm like Florida, what impact/damage do boats suffer in marinas in places like Florida when storms, etc, pass through. Not specifically in relation to Isaac but just generally.
Many thanks
It depends. Our S/V was tied up to a dock in a canal on Hutchinson Island. Fort Pierce Florida, when a portion of, then still tropical storm, Isaac passed over us. We had secured spring lines holding her and lots of bumpers protecting her hull from the fixed dock. The surge was nothing like they experienced two days later over on the Southern Gulf Coast-LA/MISS & AL...but it was there and we rose up a few feet, especially in high tide. This storm held on, over us, for three days, hitting us with gusty 45-50 mph winds , dumping tons of rain and spawning tornados, before moving on over to hit the Southern Gulf Coast with Hurricane strength.
Local knowledge of Hurricane holes helps. With with our present storm prediction technology(NOAA, etc) there is most often sufficient warning time to seek the safest option to weather the storm. Bracing for Isaac, we had planned to be hauled out, stripped of sails and other windage to be thoroughly tied down and secured if Isaac hit, but it became clear that Isaac was not going to hit us with Hurricane force so we elected to secure our boat in the canal, stay aboard and ride it out. Preparation and continued awareness, as well as being on the scene, not an absent boat owner, is, I believe the best way to minimize storm loss.
Boats that are left unprotected and unsecured during the heavy seasonal storms are beaten up, sunk or ram into other vessels. NWS the seasonal storms, the humidity and heat in Florida requires that you vigilantly keep an eye on your boat. The tropics are quickly devastating to the boats that are left unattended by infrequent and inattentive owners.
If you have the resources and want a boat in Florida but are not going to be there regularly or visit only on a "snowbird" basis, it is advisable to store the boat with a reputable boat yard that regularly checks the stored boat and its systems. These yards will "splash" your boat upon your return, have it checked and ready for a pleasurable time on the water for the duration of your visit, and then haul it out when you leave. Florida is a great place to have a boat if you are prepared to be a responsible boat owner. A large part of the damage suffered by vessels in storms comes from some other person's vessel that was not properly secured, breaking loose and ramming into those vessels that are.
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