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Old 20-03-2018, 14:14   #1
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help morse shifter

I have a 1982 morse throttle assembly liked to a kubota 14.

The shifter is not engaging the transmission until I push the throttle handle a lot and then it suddenly engages so I have NO slow motion control.

Does anyone have any manual or instructions how to adjust the throttle linkage ?

It looks like this image.

Thanks.

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Old 20-03-2018, 16:18   #2
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Re: help morse shifter

Is this a new installation or did it stop working? It seems odd to me that it would go out of adjustment and I'd suspect m the problem is elsewhere.

The first thing I'd do is unhook both cables from the shifter. The two little round bronze pins on the end are the connection points. On the other side they're held in by cotter pins. Pull those out and unhook the cables. Try not to twist the bronze pins -- they twist on the threaded end of the cables for adjustment and for now you want them to stay as is. Pull at the lever arms -- the plates the cables were attached to. Are they firmly seated on the square ended shafts they sit on? If not loosen the bed head bolt, seat the levers properly then tighten down the hex head bolt. Have someone work the lever as you watch from the inside. Do both lever arms move at the same time? Push against the clutch lever to offer resistance as you have the person outside work the levers again. Does it push back without slipping? If the answer to either of those is no then your problem is probably in the internal gears that mate the clutch lever with the throttle lever. These can wear out and if they do the lever is garbage unless you can find someone who can machine replacements. They aren't meant to be user serviceable and so you can't really find replacement parts.

If that seems fine try shifting the transmission into gear by hand to make sure nothing is mucked up on that end. If that's fine, try the adjustment process in the installation instructions which can be found here:

http://www.equipment.ath.cx/instrume...e%20MI_MIW.pdf

If it still doesn't work then go back to the theory that it's the gears that are worn and the lever needs replacement.
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Old 21-03-2018, 06:50   #3
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Re: help morse shifter

I agree that if behavior has changed over time you should root cause it before slapping a fix together. The info above about figuring out whether your controller or tranny has slop or not is spot on.

But in the "slapping a fix together" department, it looks like the throttle cable could possibly be mounted closer to the center of rotation of it's control arm, this would reduce the amount of linear travel for a given rotation of your control stick. Looks like there aren't any holes to achieve this but you could drill one. You could also do the opposite, and move the transmission cables attachment further from the center of rotation such that it moves _more_ for a given rotation of your control stick. This one even appears to have a hole you could try this on. Its not much further away, but maybe its just enough.

You can play this game on the transmission end too - usually they have different mount points on their lever arms for controllers that have different throw. Also, your transmission spec will tell you how much those things are supposed to move to effect shifting. You should verify you are getting the right amount of throw down there because getting it wrong can actually damage transmissions.

I'm assuming you've got this hooked up in the right places at least: The one that's kind of in the middle of the assembly on the shorter linkage is the throttle - you can tell because it _pulls_ the cable regardless of whether you swing the control stick fwd or back. The tranny control on the other hand needs to push for one direction, pull for the other, to effect shifting to forward or reverse.

I'd also look at the engine and tranny side and make sure slop in one place or another isn't making things worse. You know how these cables work, right? By holding the sheath and the wire inside it independently, you can effect motion of the wire relative to it's sheath. So the sheath needs to be well secured without any slop at each end for this to work.



(BTW - I really like having independent throttle + shifter controls, eliminates your problem. Although, someday someone will probably operate the shifter with the engine revving high and I'll change my opinion. )
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