Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 12-04-2007, 13:12   #16
Senior Cruiser
 
SkiprJohn's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Kea'au, Big Island, Hawaii
Boat: Cascade, Sloop, 42 - "Casual"
Posts: 14,192
Every boat I've sailed will heave to with the jib backwinded, the main all the way out and nearly luffing. Tiller to leeward. Once you get it in that position then start adjusting tiller and main to maintain your heave to position.
JohnL
__________________

__________________
SkiprJohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2007, 13:20   #17
Senior Cruiser
 
Alan Wheeler's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Marlborough Sounds. New Zealand
Boat: Hartley Tahitian 45ft. Leisure Lady
Posts: 8,038
Images: 102
Quote:
On the subject of profiles, I wish that more members would take the opportunity to fill them in. I find them very helpful in trying to get to know the people behind the screen names.
Yes I agree.

I found the "art" of heaving too on my boat quite by accendent. Although I have never tried just the mizzen, sounds interesting Thomas. I have hove too in 20kts only so far. And it was only to stop the boat to pick up a swimmer. Both main and Genoa were up and sheeted in hard'ish. I brought the boat into the wind but didn't allow ti to tack across, thus stopping it's forward momentum. Then as the forward speed stops, the bow is pushed away from the wind of course. At that point I bring the "wheel" hard around so as the rudder is trying to turn the boat into the wind and the sail is pushing the bow off the wind and the boat justs sits there virtually stationary. Well, in actual fact, it kinda makes slight forward way. As the rudder loses water flow, the head of the boat is pushed off and the sail works pulling the boat forward and as the water flow is re-established, the rudder then tries to steer the boat back up into the wind which means the sail loses drive again. I can't see how I would want to let the sails off. It would be better to have them sheeted in.
So have I done it correctly????????
I am not sure how using the mizzen would work, but I will try it. I am also not sure if the main helps, but the headsail certainly has the biggest affect on swinging the boat away.
__________________

__________________
Wheels

For God so loved the world..........He didn't send a committee.
Alan Wheeler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2007, 14:56   #18
Registered User
 
Raven's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Lake Champlain, Vermont
Boat: Pacific Seacraft Crealock 34 - "Raven"
Posts: 213
Images: 6
As you say, Alan, it is essentially an exercise of setting up competing forces. For most boats, it involves a backwinded jib to drive the bow off the wind and a rudder hard over to turn it back into the wind. Some boats heave to better than others. We all need to fine-tune the particulars of those competing forces for our individual boats.

dghall, if you've got lee helm on your boat when properly sheeted, that doesn't sound like a good thing . . .
__________________
Kevin Rose
Pacific Seacraft Crealock 34 - Raven
Burlington, Vermont
Raven is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2007, 15:50   #19
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Whangaparaoa,NZ
Boat: 63 ft John Spencer Schooner
Posts: 956
If you are heaving to as a storm tactic you will not want to ease the main, it will flog itself to death. The idea as stated earlier is to balance forces and stop the boat at an angle around 45' to the true wind. Each boat will be different and the situation will change as wind and sea state alter. Practice.
Many modern boats (Santana 22 ) have practically no forefoot so just about any sail forward of the mast is too much, hence the suggestion to try no headsail at all.
__________________
dana-tenacity is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2007, 21:12   #20
Registered User
 
patio's Avatar

Join Date: May 2004
Location: LONG BEACH, CA.
Boat: PSC Crealock 34 - Amy Michele
Posts: 16
Images: 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raven
As you say, Alan, it is essentially an exercise of setting up competing forces. For most boats, it involves a backwinded jib to drive the bow off the wind and a rudder hard over to turn it back into the wind. Some boats heave to better than others. We all need to fine-tune the particulars of those competing forces for our individual boats.

dghall, if you've got lee helm on your boat when properly sheeted, that doesn't sound like a good thing . . .

Raven

so how do you set up for heaving to?

i have the same model as you. thanks
__________________
heading south this oct 07
patio is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2007, 21:33   #21
Registered User
 
Raven's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Lake Champlain, Vermont
Boat: Pacific Seacraft Crealock 34 - "Raven"
Posts: 213
Images: 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by patio
Raven

so how do you set up for heaving to?

i have the same model as you. thanks
My PSC34 is configured as a sloop, while most of them have been rigged as cutters (perhaps making mine different from yours).
When I heave to, it's pretty standard. With main sheeted tight, tack while not releasing the headsail and taking care not to cross the wind too quickly. Once on the opposite tack, leave the jib backwinded and put the wheel hard over to windward.
__________________
Kevin Rose
Pacific Seacraft Crealock 34 - Raven
Burlington, Vermont
Raven is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2007, 21:38   #22
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: 34n118w
Boat: Santana 22-Caper
Posts: 8
Ok, if I am needing to heave to to reef the main, I cant imagine trying to do that while it's sheeted all the way out. Am I missing something?

Raven, what are the dangers of a boat with lee helm? And is the only way to correct it with a much smaller headsail?
__________________
dghall is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2007, 21:41   #23
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: 34n118w
Boat: Santana 22-Caper
Posts: 8
One more thing...

I have hank jibs, not a roller. Maybe if my only real "reefing" option is to just drop the jib, I should seriously consider investing in a roller for reasons other than convenience?

Thanks again for all the great wisdom!

David
__________________
dghall is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-04-2007, 03:17   #24
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Whangaparaoa,NZ
Boat: 63 ft John Spencer Schooner
Posts: 956
DG, go practice first before spending money, hanks are fine on your boat. What's wrong with dropping the headsail to the deck, undo the halyard and it falls down.
I find the easiest way to reef is going upwind, just ease the mainsheet and reef. If you are going too fast for comfort and have a roller take in some headsail first.
__________________
dana-tenacity is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-04-2007, 06:56   #25
Registered User
 
Raven's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Lake Champlain, Vermont
Boat: Pacific Seacraft Crealock 34 - "Raven"
Posts: 213
Images: 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by dghall
Raven, what are the dangers of a boat with lee helm? And is the only way to correct it with a much smaller headsail?
A few degrees of weather helm is generally considered a desireable characteristic. In a puff it is much safer if the tendancy is to round up and luff rather than bearing off with the increased potential for a knock-down.

A well balanced helm is primarily a characteristic of the boat's design. Altering the "helm" may be as simple as raking the mast aft a bit, or as complex as moving the mast. Without getting into the specifics in this post, I've located an article by yacht designer Ted Brewer that might be helpful to you. In it, the author lists the following as remedies for lee helm:

To correct lee helm (shorten lead)
* Increase mast rake by lengthening headstay, shortening backstay
* Move headstay aft, or shorten bowsprit
* Move mast aft
* Lengthen boom and fit larger mainsail; ditto with mizzen
* Adjust main to greater fullness
* Move centerboard forward, if possible.


To read the full article, click here: On Helm Balance

__________________
Kevin Rose
Pacific Seacraft Crealock 34 - Raven
Burlington, Vermont
Raven is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-04-2007, 09:08   #26
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: 34n118w
Boat: Santana 22-Caper
Posts: 8
Dana,

When I douse the head, it's never just releasing the halyward and down it comes. On my boat I always end up on the foredeck pulling it as it luffs wildly. Just thinking about doing that in wind and waves as a reef is a little nervewracking, but I will figure something out. Other than that, I actually appreciate the hanks and the ability to pick a sail that matches the weather each time I go out.

d
__________________
dghall is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-04-2007, 09:54   #27
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Seattle
Boat: Cal 40
Posts: 2,401
Images: 7
Put a downhaul on your jib. Tie a light line to the head or top hank, lead it inside the rest of the hanks to a block on the bow, then aft to the cockpit or mast. Release the halyard and pull on the downhaul, cleat it off and the sail can't ride up the forestay.

John
__________________
cal40john is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-04-2007, 11:39   #28
Senior Cruiser
 
SkiprJohn's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Kea'au, Big Island, Hawaii
Boat: Cascade, Sloop, 42 - "Casual"
Posts: 14,192
Aloha d,
You've certainly gotten a lot of replies and advice. You have a light, responsive boat. Next time you go out try going close hauled, then come about without releasing your soon to be windward jib sheet, let the boat slow to nearly a stop. Put your helm to lee (tiller to leeward) and ease out your mainsail until nearly luffing. Once you get the boat hove to you can experiment with adjusting rudder angles and sheeting in the main. When you want to tuck in a reef just haul in on the main sheet until you can reach whatever you need to to take in your reef. If you experiment and refine this tactic you'll be able to tuck in your reef single handed no problem. I used to do it with my Catalina 22 in good breeze and lots of chop. I didn't have a furler and didn't have any halyards led to the cockpit. Just an old simple rig.
Good luck.
JohnL
__________________
SkiprJohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-04-2007, 23:09   #29
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 976
Images: 6
A lot of boats will do a simple "version" of hove to by backing a small jib versus hard across helm, and nothing else. (storm jib) nice and simple and very little windage.
__________________
cooper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-04-2007, 12:27   #30
Registered User
 
patio's Avatar

Join Date: May 2004
Location: LONG BEACH, CA.
Boat: PSC Crealock 34 - Amy Michele
Posts: 16
Images: 5
Raven,
mines a cutter. but that won't prevent me from trying your set up. and also try with the stay sail on the inner stay, also

thanks.
__________________

__________________
heading south this oct 07
patio is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 08:26.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.