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Old 18-11-2012, 11:40   #16
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Re: Heaters and Carbon Monoxide ...

I see deaths from CO poisoning. Do not mess with it. I don't even really like my diesel heater. I am looking into a heat pump, and yeah, blankets work.
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Old 18-11-2012, 11:56   #17
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Re: Heaters and Carbon Monoxide ...

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Originally Posted by s/v Beth View Post
I see deaths from CO poisoning. Do not mess with it. I don't even really like my diesel heater. I am looking into a heat pump, and yeah, blankets work.



Yep, there have been diesel heater related fatalities as well. One case I know of the owners were running the Webasto on the hook overnight, and had opened an aft cabin porthole for ventilation. Unfortunately the porthole they opened was just downwind of the diesel heaters exhaust outlet, and the wind ended up blowing the exhaust through the porthole into the cabin. They never woke up, an entire family of four. But I would definitely take a vented system over an unvented one any day.
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Old 18-11-2012, 12:19   #18
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Re: Heaters and Carbon Monoxide ...

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Unfortunately the porthole they opened was just downwind of the diesel heaters exhaust outlet, and the wind ended up blowing the exhaust through the porthole into the cabin. They never woke up, an entire family of four. But I would definitely take a vented system over an unvented one any day.
They must not have had an air exchange set up which would draw air in from aft and exhaust it out the front--that would have prevented a CO build up.
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Old 18-11-2012, 12:19   #19
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Re: Heaters and Carbon Monoxide ...

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Originally Posted by minaret View Post
Yep, there have been diesel heater related fatalities as well. One case I know of the owners were running the Webasto on the hook overnight, and had opened an aft cabin porthole for ventilation. Unfortunately the porthole they opened was just downwind of the diesel heaters exhaust outlet, and the wind ended up blowing the exhaust through the porthole into the cabin. They never woke up, an entire family of four. But I would definitely take a vented system over an unvented one any day.
I've fitted a Webasto Diesel Heater for when we venture to the colder climates. Even though the diesel heater is vented I would hate to leave it on continuously in case we had developed a hole in the exhaust hose. I've flicked it on during coolish September day (16 deg C) and it warmed the boat up to comfortable in about 5 minutes. I was then able to switch it off for 30 minutes and the boat stayed warm. What I want to know is what amount of "on time" would be needed in say, in Alaska in summer?
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Old 18-11-2012, 14:23   #20
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Re: Heaters and Carbon Monoxide ...

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I've fitted a Webasto Diesel Heater for when we venture to the colder climates. Even though the diesel heater is vented I would hate to leave it on continuously in case we had developed a hole in the exhaust hose. I've flicked it on during coolish September day (16 deg C) and it warmed the boat up to comfortable in about 5 minutes. I was then able to switch it off for 30 minutes and the boat stayed warm. What I want to know is what amount of "on time" would be needed in say, in Alaska in summer?


Just fit a proper thermostat and it will cycle to maintain the desired temp as necessary, just like your furnace at home. You can have as many thermal zones as you like if you do a hydronic system.
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Old 18-11-2012, 14:27   #21
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Re: Heaters and Carbon Monoxide ...

We just finished installing a Dickinson Newport Propane 1200 fireplace/furnace using outside air to burn, using a flexible 3 inch double walled vent pipe going thru a small side plexiglass window ( no holes in the ceiling to leak ). It keeps our catamaran at 72 F when it is 30F outside using no 12V or warmer with the little fan running. No CO2 inside The cost was not bad at $835.00 with all the parts except the propane hoses and connection fittings, not bad for a secure nights sleep. The fireplace is great while sipping a little wine.
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Old 18-11-2012, 16:12   #22
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Re: Heaters and Carbon Monoxide ...

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Just fit a proper thermostat and it will cycle to maintain the desired temp as necessary, just like your furnace at home. You can have as many thermal zones as you like if you do a hydronic system.
Mine allows up to five thermostatically controlled space heating zones.
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Old 18-11-2012, 17:03   #23
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Re: Heaters and Carbon Monoxide ...

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Mine allows up to five thermostatically controlled space heating zones.


I've got mine set up with 7. Forward head, aft head, forepeak, forward cabin, galley and saloon, pilot house, aft cabin. Plus defrosters for the pilot house windows. I'm thinking about seeing if I can add towel warming racks in the heads, should be easy with hydronic.
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Old 18-11-2012, 18:03   #24
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Re: Heaters and Carbon Monoxide ...

Towel warming racks are a great idea!
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Old 18-11-2012, 18:33   #25
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Re: Heaters and Carbon Monoxide ...

I had a friend die from using a kerosene heater on his boat. Just because some here have gotten away with using camp heaters I strongly recommend against it. All heaters that burn fuel use oxygen and produce CO. Lack of oxygen and CO gases can and do kill people. The forced air diesel heater draws combustion air from outside the boat and exhausts combustion gases outside. Be safe and use a heater only designed for use in enclosed spaces, Is your life worth saving a few hundred bucks?
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Old 18-11-2012, 18:40   #26
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Re: Heaters and Carbon Monoxide ...

I agree with the installed vented units being the best way to go.

Our furnace is an Ardic (no longer made), but it's beautifully built.
The whole burner assembly is made from high quality SS with tight fitting parts.
The burner is mounted in the stern and has hot air outlets in the saloon and forward compartments.
A thermostat is mounted centrally and keeps us nice and toasty with no dampness to deal with.
We've never had a problem with exhaust getting back into the boat at anchor.
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Old 18-11-2012, 19:00   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eliems
Yes, I have a Webasto as well but it runs for 15 min's and then cycles off and has to be reset (button on/off), and then repeats. Certainly warms the space up some but not enough. I think there is a turn in the ducting for the forced air that is too tight and pinches of some flow (although it blows pretty well). Otherwise I don't know why it isn't adequate.?
You system is not functioning properly. Was it professionally installed? I recommend you have a pro fix it, one way or the other.

I have Webasto's 2nd smallest marine forced-air system heating a 46' boat without any difficulty. It can run for months without ever needing a reset. Indeed, in six years, I've never had to reset the system once.

I would also mention that my boat has 4 CO detectors: one in the saloon and one in each of the sleeping cabins. I would never trust my life to a single CO detector.
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Old 18-11-2012, 21:05   #28
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Re: Heaters and Carbon Monoxide ...

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I would also mention that my boat has 4 CO detectors: one in the saloon and one in each of the sleeping cabins. I would never trust my life to a single CO detector.


+1. I would also mention that there is a big difference between a cheap CO sniffer and a good one, or sniffers for oxygen depletion and propane. Many newer catalytic systems have an oxygen depletion sensor built in.
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Old 24-11-2012, 09:59   #29
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Re: Heaters and Carbon Monoxide ...

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It's a good idea for safety. I spent 2 weeks in a 23 footer (in laws!) with a Platinum Cat heater. Worked great. Thermostat controlled etc. For $268 you can get one that heats 260 sq feet and weighs 12lbs.. According to spec you need on sq inch of vent for each 1000 btu's on a non-safe type. One portlite open ought to do it if unsure.... or better yet two cracked!

Had this model heater on the boat when it was purchased. Unit was outside vented, when run it would cause condensation all over the ceiling. Pulled it out and installed a diesel heater that I have been having mucho problems with as well, however no condensation. When I did a cost comparison propane appeared to be a fairly costly way to heat as well as the issue of having to procure the gas and switch bottles etc. The propane heater seemed not to be the option for a full time livaboard. With the diesel option I am plumbed into the main engine tanks, 90 gallons and with an average consumption of 2 gallons per day shaould have a nice long run time before having to refill.
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Old 24-11-2012, 10:50   #30
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Re: Heaters and Carbon Monoxide ...

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+1. I would also mention that there is a big difference between a cheap CO sniffer and a good one, or sniffers for oxygen depletion and propane. Many newer catalytic systems have an oxygen depletion sensor built in.
Yeah, I've read that the life of the detectors is considered as low as 2 years..... and that's in a non marine environment. Here's an interesting test of 3 new units. only one of the three seem to work. I've just never felt safe leaving any heater on while sleeping other than electric.
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