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Old 09-01-2006, 20:48   #1
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Boat: amel super maramu 53 Kimberlite
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heat sealing stamoid

My bimini and weather cloths are made of stamoid.all the seams are heat sealed and not sewn.
how does one heat seal this stuff?
fair winds,
eric
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Old 10-01-2006, 03:06   #2
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Fusing Vinyl* Heat-Seal Seams:

- Use a hot iron to seal vinyl seams. It's necessary to use a cotton or linen setting on most irons, but experiment to find the best temperature for your iron. The use of a heavy press cloth also will require a higher iron temperature.

- With the press cloth over the fabric, press the iron down for approximately 15 seconds, then lift; don't slide the iron. Let the fabric cool before handling. Check the seal. If the fabric can be pulled apart, press again, holding the iron in place for a longer time period. A successfully sealed seam is almost impossible to pull apart when cool.

- When heat-sealing a seam, the heat must be applied only in the seam area. This can be tricky because the seam area is hidden from view by the press cloth. Remember, the fabric will seal anywhere heat is applied. Any narrow surface that raises the area to be sealed and allows the rest of the fabric to fall away from the pressing area is an indispensable aide (a short length of 2x2"). Place a press cloth over the 2x2", position the seam on the binding and press only on the raised area.

- An easy alternative method is achieved by sealing heat-seal fabric strips over the seams wrong side. After stitching a conventional seam right sides together, trim one seam allowance to 1/4". Trim the other seam allowance to 3/8" and finger-press both seam allowances to one side. Cut a 3/4"-wide heat-seal fabric strip and place it along the seamline on the garment's wrong side with laminated sides together. When heat-sealed in place, the seam should be waterproof and have a finished look on the garment inside.

* Stamoid is a vinyl laminate (French product)

I have an electric seam-sealing iron, which has a 1" x 3" heating pad, covered with a non-stick fabric. Handed down from my father - don't know it's source.

HTH,
Gord May
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Old 10-01-2006, 19:12   #3
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Boat: amel super maramu 53 Kimberlite
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thanks for the info

Hi,
i guess stamoid makes sense since i have a french boat.
i wonder how they seal the fabric on my boat. the sealed area is only 1/4 inch wide.
fair winds,
eric'
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