Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 01-07-2013, 14:02   #16
Don't ask if you can't handle it
 
sailorboy1's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: On the boat somewhere
Boat: Hunter 410
Posts: 12,305
Re: Giving it a go...

Quote:
Originally Posted by DaBod;1274699
To celebrate, we are going to spend our first few nights aboard. We'll shove off the morning of the 4th and not return to the slip until the evening of the 7th. Obviously to the seasoned cruisers and liveaboards such a thing isn't even worth mentioning, but to us this is yet another step toward the ultimate goal. [COLOR=red
Sounds fun, I plan to do pretty much the same thing. This is pretty much how everyone works their way into cruising[/COLOR]


I haven't felt this antsy or looked forward to a trip this much in a very long time. Nothing wrong with that, means you will be paying attention.

My apologies for a post that doesn't have much merit, but I had to share my excitement somewhere and thought this was a place in which some might relate. Your post had pently of merit which is why people read it and even replied
Take it easy, sail comfortable, reef early, don't become a slave to schedule. The last thing you what on your first trip is to sail on the edge.

Here's wishing you a nice boring trip
__________________

__________________
jobless, houseless, clueless, living on a boat and cruising around somewhere
sailorboy1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 14:03   #17
Registered User
 
DaBod's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Texas
Boat: None at the moment
Posts: 89
Re: Giving it a go...

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Garbone View Post
Good luck,

Get "Drag Queen" app if you have an Iphone. On the hook you can leave the phone on the charger near the bunk. Just glance at the display of position and bearing every few hours. It is easy to tell if your swinging with the wind or dragging.

On the anchor light here is what you do, turn everything but the light in question off, disconnect the positive lead to the battery and then jumper the lead to the battery using a cheapo multimetter set to amps. It will show you an amperage which you can then use to do the math on AmpHours.
Thanks very much for the advice!
__________________

__________________
DaBod is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2013, 09:55   #18
Registered User
 
DaBod's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Texas
Boat: None at the moment
Posts: 89
Re: Giving it a go...

Well, we made it through. The boat didn’t sink, we still love each other, and I am back at my desk with the rocking feeling of the boat still under me.

I’d say for a trip that involved several days of living on a boat things went very smoothly. There were some issues and challenges, but they weren’t catastrophic and were or will be fixed. One will require a trip up the stick to change the anchor light, and the other will require me to learn more about the one system I’ve procrastinated digging into: the head (the macerator pump, specifically). From my time on this forum and books I have read, it seems one is not a proper boat owner if he/she has not had to deal with marine sanitation issues, so I will consider it my initiation. Fortunately, the issue didn’t arise until we were back in the slip yesterday afternoon, so it didn’t impact the entire trip.

Enough with the bad; here’s what I learned:

1. It is different from camping, as space is far more limited. Accessing one item usually means moving three or four others, which can require a lot of patience. I am certain that this improves over time as you adapt to living in a small area.

2. Organization is critical and must be strategic.

3. All areas of the boat serve multiple purposes. By living in a house we are engrained with notions that certain items/activities only belong in certain areas, but on a boat that just cannot be the case…at least on our small boat. For instance, when cooking, it wasn’t uncommon to prep items or have them set aside on the chart table, cockpit seat, or companionway steps. All areas have names, but in reality they are just surfaces and provide a lot more benefit than their name suggests.

4. I tend to worry a lot, and I worried a lot more on this trip than expected. In fact, the first night at anchor I didn’t sleep at all and was a bit of a nervous wreck. The second I closed my eyes my head would fill with “Are we dragging?” “Are we visible enough?” “How are we doing on battery power?” “What the hell was that noise?” I’ve never been so relieved to see the sun come up, which incidentally, was breathtaking.

5. Guests don’t get it. We had overnight guests come out for the last night, and they just didn’t seem to get it. Not that it is entirely their fault, but the idea of self sufficiency requires thought, planning, and fairly significant responsibility. While I very much enjoyed their company, I also noticed how easily they would forget to turn off cabin lights, or want to blast the stereo for hours on end without considering the source of that power. Finding a balance in the conveyance of such issues without being a tyrant adds another layer of stress, and can be a bit frustrating.

6. Food tastes better in the cockpit. Conversations are better at anchor than they are on land. Sunsets are incredible as they dance across the water. Sleep (when had) is deeper and much more fulfilling on a boat.

7. It takes a bit of time to realize that it is ok to have nothing to do and to relax, but it is wonderful when you finally do.

8. And lastly, I am going to be a father. My wife informed me that the dreams we share of a life aboard will now include at least one more. Astounding, a little terrifying, and overwhelmingly exciting.

All in all, I’d say it was a success, and life altering in more ways than one. We’ve got a long ways to go and a lot to learn, but we become smarter, stronger, and a more cohesive team each time we set sail, drop anchor, reef the main, land at a dock, chase an elusive electrical issue, etc. I can’t wait for more, and really appreciate the support and encouragement of the folks on this forum.
__________________
DaBod is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2013, 10:01   #19
Armchair Bucketeer
 
David_Old_Jersey's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 10,013
Images: 4
Re: Giving it a go...

Sounds like a great trip
David_Old_Jersey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2013, 10:09   #20
Senior Cruiser
 
Cheechako's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Skagit City, WA
Posts: 19,334
Re: Giving it a go...

Quote:
Originally Posted by DaBod View Post
Well, we made it through. The boat didn’t sink, we still love each other, and I am back at my desk with the rocking feeling of the boat still under me.

I’d say for a trip that involved several days of living on a boat things went very smoothly. There were some issues and challenges, but they weren’t catastrophic and were or will be fixed. One will require a trip up the stick to change the anchor light, and the other will require me to learn more about the one system I’ve procrastinated digging into: the head (the macerator pump, specifically). From my time on this forum and books I have read, it seems one is not a proper boat owner if he/she has not had to deal with marine sanitation issues, so I will consider it my initiation. Fortunately, the issue didn’t arise until we were back in the slip yesterday afternoon, so it didn’t impact the entire trip.

Enough with the bad; here’s what I learned:

1. It is different from camping, as space is far more limited. Accessing one item usually means moving three or four others, which can require a lot of patience. I am certain that this improves over time as you adapt to living in a small area.

2. Organization is critical and must be strategic.

3. All areas of the boat serve multiple purposes. By living in a house we are engrained with notions that certain items/activities only belong in certain areas, but on a boat that just cannot be the case…at least on our small boat. For instance, when cooking, it wasn’t uncommon to prep items or have them set aside on the chart table, cockpit seat, or companionway steps. All areas have names, but in reality they are just surfaces and provide a lot more benefit than their name suggests.

4. I tend to worry a lot, and I worried a lot more on this trip than expected. In fact, the first night at anchor I didn’t sleep at all and was a bit of a nervous wreck. The second I closed my eyes my head would fill with “Are we dragging?” “Are we visible enough?” “How are we doing on battery power?” “What the hell was that noise?” I’ve never been so relieved to see the sun come up, which incidentally, was breathtaking.

5. Guests don’t get it. We had overnight guests come out for the last night, and they just didn’t seem to get it. Not that it is entirely their fault, but the idea of self sufficiency requires thought, planning, and fairly significant responsibility. While I very much enjoyed their company, I also noticed how easily they would forget to turn off cabin lights, or want to blast the stereo for hours on end without considering the source of that power. Finding a balance in the conveyance of such issues without being a tyrant adds another layer of stress, and can be a bit frustrating.

6. Food tastes better in the cockpit. Conversations are better at anchor than they are on land. Sunsets are incredible as they dance across the water. Sleep (when had) is deeper and much more fulfilling on a boat.

7. It takes a bit of time to realize that it is ok to have nothing to do and to relax, but it is wonderful when you finally do.

8. And lastly, I am going to be a father. My wife informed me that the dreams we share of a life aboard will now include at least one more. Astounding, a little terrifying, and overwhelmingly exciting.

All in all, I’d say it was a success, and life altering in more ways than one. We’ve got a long ways to go and a lot to learn, but we become smarter, stronger, and a more cohesive team each time we set sail, drop anchor, reef the main, land at a dock, chase an elusive electrical issue, etc. I can’t wait for more, and really appreciate the support and encouragement of the folks on this forum.
Gawd I love this............ it sounds so familiar! all so true.
__________________
"I spent most of my money on Booze, Broads and Boats. The rest I wasted" - Elmore Leonard











Cheechako is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2013, 10:17   #21
Registered User
 
deckofficer's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Northern and Southern California
Boat: too many
Posts: 4,198
Images: 4
Re: Giving it a go...

But we are still hungry for pictures. Glad to hear it all went well, and as Cheechako said, a bit of deja vu.
__________________
Bob
USCG Unlimited Tonnage Open Ocean (CMA)
http://tbuckets.lefora.com/
deckofficer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2013, 12:52   #22
Registered User
 
SmartMove's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Cruising the Eastern Caribbean
Boat: Beneteau 473
Posts: 779
Images: 1
Congratulations! On both the trip and the baby.
__________________
Time is a companion that goes with us on a journey. It reminds us to cherish each moment, because it will never come again. What we leave behind is not as important as how we have lived. JEAN LUC PICARD, Captain of the Starship Enterprise
SmartMove is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2013, 13:22   #23
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Seattle
Boat: Krogen 58' Xiao Xiu
Posts: 276
Send a message via MSN to JayCall
Re: Giving it a go...

Wow-what a first trip!

I think that no matter where life leads you, where the boat sails you, this will be the trip you will be talking about when you are old and gray!
__________________
JayCall is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2013, 13:47   #24
Don't ask if you can't handle it
 
sailorboy1's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: On the boat somewhere
Boat: Hunter 410
Posts: 12,305
Re: Giving it a go...

Quote:
Originally Posted by DaBod View Post
8. And lastly, I am going to be a father. My wife informed me that the dreams we share of a life aboard will now include at least one more. Astounding, a little terrifying, and overwhelmingly exciting.

Is there a special "X" on your chart now for that anchorage?
__________________
jobless, houseless, clueless, living on a boat and cruising around somewhere
sailorboy1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2013, 14:36   #25
Registered User
 
DaBod's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Texas
Boat: None at the moment
Posts: 89
Re: Giving it a go...

Here are a couple of shots I snapped when we stopped to grab some more ice this weekend, and one peering in through the companionway to show off the newly re-upholstered cushions.

The cabin sole is a bit ugly, so we usually keep a rug down to hide it (not sure why that isn't in the picture). I am working on building a faux teak & holly sole to lay in, but am quite a ways out from completion.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Sarah E (1).jpg
Views:	94
Size:	92.0 KB
ID:	63790   Click image for larger version

Name:	Sara E Cabin.JPG
Views:	93
Size:	248.3 KB
ID:	63791  

Click image for larger version

Name:	Sarah E. (2).jpg
Views:	85
Size:	95.1 KB
ID:	63794   Click image for larger version

Name:	Cabin Sole Dry.JPG
Views:	86
Size:	115.5 KB
ID:	63795  

Click image for larger version

Name:	Cabin Sole.JPG
Views:	81
Size:	96.9 KB
ID:	63796  
__________________
DaBod is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2013, 14:43   #26
Registered User
 
DaBod's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Texas
Boat: None at the moment
Posts: 89
Re: Giving it a go...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Don L View Post
Is there a special "X" on your chart now for that anchorage?
Ha! According to the wife it did happen several weeks ago on the boat. Hopefully that means the kid is hard wired to enjoy a life aboard.
__________________
DaBod is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2013, 15:09   #27
Registered User
 
Gelfling's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Stingray Point, Chesapeake Bay
Boat: Ericson, 28+
Posts: 294
Send a message via Skype™ to Gelfling
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaBod

Ha! According to the wife it did happen several weeks ago on the boat. Hopefully that means the kid is hard wired to enjoy a life aboard.
From personal experience......he WILL be. Even if you sell the boat just after/before he/she is born.....it will be in his/her blood. My father owned a boat when I was concieved and sold it just before I was born (different times) and I always had a fondness for the water and sailing.

It was great to read such an uplifting thread! Thanks!
__________________
Gelfling is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2013, 15:19   #28
Registered User

Join Date: May 2013
Location: Guernsey
Posts: 9
Re: Giving it a go...

We have always used hurricane lamps so no drain on the batteries! I thought your post was excellent and I want to read about your exploits as you move around.
__________________
PeterDB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2013, 16:39   #29
Registered User
 
Ray4Man's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Stockton, MO
Boat: 21' Buccaneer
Posts: 15
Images: 6
Re: Giving it a go...

I think it's great that you posted this. My wife and I finally spent the night on ours for the first time last week, too!
__________________
Ray4Man is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2013, 18:09   #30
Senior Cruiser
 
Therapy's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: W Florida
Boat: The Jon boat still, plus a 2007 SeaCat.
Posts: 6,894
Images: 4
Re: Giving it a go...

DaBod,

I just found this thread today.

Congratulations.

You remind me of me. A worry wart. Always trying to think of the worst possible thaing that can happen at any given moment - so one can be prepared for it.

It takes a lot of energy to do that. It also keeps you from seeing some things in a better light. After more experience it is one is not so "paranoid" and can sleep better and relax more when awake. Of course there is balance involved but a lot of that is what type of personality you have to start with.

In order to get some needed rest one night I had to just tell myself "What is the worst case?" "Dragging and smashing on those steel spikes of course." "Oh well, off to bed then."

Relax. Don't look at the list "too" often.

It is really cool isn't it?
__________________

__________________
Who knows what is next.
Therapy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 00:33.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.