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Old 03-07-2016, 21:43   #91
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Re: Getting comfortable with anchoring is really liberating

The "trick" is being choosy where one anchors.



Here, several boats (not all in view) were anchored close, as about 200 feet apart. Seemed close but not threatening, and appearing much further to the camera.
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Old 04-07-2016, 04:41   #92
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Re: Getting comfortable with anchoring is really liberating

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Originally Posted by senormechanico View Post
Here it is:

Let me know if you're ever up in the Pacific NorthWest !
You're right, it's Floriduh's problem.
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Old 04-07-2016, 07:15   #93
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Re: Getting comfortable with anchoring is really liberating

I was surprised recently when, after a couple of weeks of training on his new boat, a student said to me that the thing that concerned him most was anchoring. Admittedly, we were in the Windward Islands with very crowded anchorages.

On their first solo run they handled the sailing just fine, even heaving to in a squall, but when it came to anchoring in a crowded anchorage they motored around for a LONG time looking for a spot (I was ashore having a beer). Ultimately, after a few attempts, they did get the hook down in a good location.
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Old 04-07-2016, 07:39   #94
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Re: Getting comfortable with anchoring is really liberating

We should not have this kind of conversations dry! Anchors and multiholes should only be discussed over the bar, at arm's length ... ;-)

Love and flowers. Very good read here.

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Old 04-07-2016, 07:49   #95
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Re: Getting comfortable with anchoring is really liberating

We should not have this kind of conversations dry! Anchors and multiholes should only be discussed over the bar, at arm's length ... ;-)

Love and flowers. Very good read here.

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Old 06-07-2016, 15:19   #96
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Re: Getting comfortable with anchoring is really liberating

If my wife reads this threads there's going to be evil chicken wind stares (called bitch wings by some so I understand) directed at some of you!
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Old 09-07-2016, 10:12   #97
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Re: Getting comfortable with anchoring is really liberating

I had to get comfortable with anchoring pretty quick on our last trip. After years of chartering in the BVIs and being on either a mooring ball or in the marina we headed to the Leewards starting out in Antigua. First night out we anchored in the bay to the right just as you enter English Harbour. I dove the anchor and then we took the dinghy ashore. While eating dinner a nasty storm line moved through with lightning, sideways rain and what seemed to be about 40 knot winds. I ran across to the dock on the south side of Nelsons Dockyard where through the rain I could barely make out our boat bobbing up and down and dancing on the anchor across the bay. The weather lasted probably 30-45 minutes and I sat there in the soaking rain watching the boat most of that time - ready to jump in the dinghy and brave the storm if necessary. At least there was a good 1/2 mile or so of fetch between the boat and the nearest shore if the anchor did fail - maybe I could get there in time. Finally the storm calmed down a bit and everyone finished up with dinner. We jumped in the dinghy and returned to the boat still braving the rain and occasional lightning to the sides of us only to find the boat sitting exactly how we had left it. I slept pretty good that night knowing that it held in those conditions. I had anchored before, but mostly in benign weather and not often overnight.

We anchored several more times during that trip and it got easier and easier to relax each time. Sometimes we had to set it a couple times and once we left an anchorage on Nevis because we couldn't get a good set. Another time we dropped the hook at Barbuda where we had a deserted 14 mile pristine beach all to ourselves for two days with the anchor dug deeply into the sand bottom. I even had enough confidence at one time to anchor a couple hundred yards off of the Nonsuch Bay resort break wall with the wind blowing towards the resort. Of course I dove the anchor and I also backed down to 1500 rpms for half a minute and then to 2000 rpms for a few seconds after that just to be sure. I kept a very close eye on the boat that evening from shore and I woke up several times that night to check our position, but everything held rock solid. At the end of the two weeks I was actually looking forward to anchoring and now I'm re-thinking how I will approach our next trip to the BVIs. I think we'll spend more time at the areas without mooring balls that will be less crowded and where we don't have to show up by 2:00 to ensure there is an open ball. Or at least we'll be more relaxed because if all the balls are full we'll just drop the anchor for the night.

There are a couple things I always did when anchoring. First, I always backed down and often quite a bit more than what is probably necessary. I also always dove the anchor and took as much time as necessary to be comfortable with the set. If I had any concerns I had my son back the boat down more so I could watch the anchor while he did it. Finally, I always marked our position on my iPad Navionics app as well as the boats chart plotter so I could always check to make sure we didn't drag. I typically checked it a couple times shortly following anchoring, anytime we returned to the boat from ashore or snorkeling, and before going to bed. We generally put out at least 5:1 scope and wherever space allowed we would do 7:1.

I know I am pretty green compared to many on this board and this is probably considered pretty trivial, but that was a major leap for me. Actually, it was probably one of the most significant advancements I've made in quite some time sailing-wise and has really expanded how I can approach our trips. Now, just don't ask me about my first experience docking stern-to between two other boats in a cross wind with the bow tied off to a mooring between. I guess you can go too slow in a marina after all. However, no damage done to anything aside from my ego.

Matt
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Old 09-07-2016, 15:13   #98
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Re: Getting comfortable with anchoring is really liberating

Nice thread. Personally I learned a lot by snorkeling out viewing my hook and sometime others next to me. Its a great way to learn.

What always concerned me more was leaving the boat during the day for a shore excursion. Surprised this was not mentioned in this thread.

Spent 3 years cruising BVIs and only anchored a few times during the day. In BVIs I would snorkel out and check our hook and the hooks for the boats next to ours. I could see boats with short scopes that dragged a good 50 feet. I liked grabbing on the chain and pulling my self down for close up look. Yeah I know that is a dangerous thing to do. Anyway, it was obvious from snorkeling that with good scope the chain pretty much stays on the bottom and no worries. This year we sailed St martin, st barts, st kitts, nevis for 14 days and only moored up one night and docked 2 nights. I would snorkel out and always check our hook. I slept a lot better. I also did check things out when I got up to pee which was 2 times a night and the other guys did the same.

After checking the hook, I would often tell our crew to put out a tad more scope when I could see the chain not sitting on the bottom like it should. I would sometimes check our neighbors hook. On one occasion I called up to have our crew move the boat since ours was too close to another hook. I then swam over after they reset the new location. I asked if they were good and they gave me the thumbs up. Looking at the chain length on the bottom it was obvious we did not put out near enough chain. I was looking at the hook that was set in the sand and just like that I saw the hook rise up out of the sand and was 5 foot off the bottom like it was floating being pulled at speed through the water. I took my head out of the water and could see the wind had swung our bow around quickly. I yelled anchor drag and they reset it . Anyway my point is I learned a lot snorkeling and visually seeing the anchor and chain.

Getting back to the shore excursion. We anchored a few nights at St Barts after leaving St Martin all was fine. St Barts has a long dingy ride to shore though. Sailed to St Kitts and Nevis, After returning from Nevis 45+nm we anchored for a third night at St Barts. We were tired and took the long dingy ride in for dinner. It rained hard during dinner but eventually stopped for our dark dingy ride back. Our dingy man that night could not find our boat. Scary thought that our boat somehow drifted away or pirates took it. Our anchor light was on. Why can't we find our boat. It had to be right here damn it. After about 5 minutes, seemed like 15 minutes, of circling around we found our boat obviously right where we left it.
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Old 09-07-2016, 15:16   #99
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Re: Getting comfortable with anchoring is really liberating

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Originally Posted by Mike OReilly View Post
I'm far from an expert, but I do anchor a lot. I've never quantified my anchoring, but this parallels my experience. I've played with many different anchor lays. A tandem anchor is a specialized tool that is definitely useful in certain conditions. My conclusion is that, as a general anchoring technique, tandem anchoring is worse than a single proper-sized anchor, on proper rode, and most importantly, proper set technique.
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Old 09-07-2016, 15:46   #100
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Re: Getting comfortable with anchoring is really liberating

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The reverse acid test is no good in some scenarios. E.g. oozing mud. Common in Caribbean lagoons.

If you hard reverse, you will drag. You just drop the hook then reverse only a small amount. Let it sit (sink?).

I do not know the physics of light oozy mud but I know you will drag if you hard reverse. You will not if you let it sink over 24 hours or so.

Once in, you can hard reverse and you are put, but you can't do the test right away after arriving.

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Clays and silts exhibit a phenomena referred to as shear thinning when disturbed. After being sheared they slowly regain their strength. What is happening is that after the anchor is pulled in the clay or silt body slowly regains it's strength and it appears that the anchor has dug into stronger material. It may not have and will drag if the shear strength of the material is exceeded.
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