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Old 14-02-2010, 06:18   #16
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Ah - in many European marinas, particularly in tidal areas, the end of each line of fingers has a full width pontoon, often called the hammerhead. Getting on to that, or alongside boats already tied to it involves no tight turns in the aisle, and so it's much much easier ...
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Old 14-02-2010, 07:50   #17
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Just remember that you are definately not in an airplane! You have many more options for a safe off marina (airport) landing and the scenario isn't an emergency (comparaitvely speaking). You craft was meant to go without the engine, unlike our airborne ones! The resource management is different with the options available and a safe outcome way more likely!
So, aviate (sail), navigate (don't run aground), and communicate! There are ussually others who will be there for you. Just outside the marina there should be helping hands. Bringing her in with two push boats and someone at the helm and others ashore might be an option. Something hard to do in an airplane. Finding a place to drop the hook is something quite different also! Extend your cruise and call work to let them know of your 'emergency'. Perhaps you will want that engine to fail more often!
I'd say 'keep the blue side up!" but that doesn't even realy apply because many sailboats will right themselves.. but you know what I mean.
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Old 14-02-2010, 08:15   #18
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If you are, in fact, just using this as an exercise, I suggest you have a full engine manual aboard. Memorize the bleeding procedures and make a placard up. Mark all bleed points on your engine with a bright colored paint, and have all necessary tools kept near by to enable bleeding. Unless you blew an engine, it's much more likely you have a clogged fuel filter or have overheated. Fouled prop is also a possibility. These aren't the types of problems you should be calling for help over. Unlike your aeroplane, you can work on the engine while you are aboard, and it's your responsibility to know how. BTW, anchor a fender as a float someday soon and practise sailing up to it from all points of sail. It will help your confidence immensely should you ever need to do some close quarters sailing. As a pilot you practiced over and over for events that hopefully will never happen. As a student pilot, my instructor once showed me how, with rudder and elevator only, you can fly a Cessna 150 just like an R/C plane. One month later the 172 we were in lost all ailerons. I mean, what are the chances? Did you know you can turn a Cessna pretty well by pushing the doors open during flight?
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Old 14-02-2010, 08:34   #19
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Yes! Have done it for the experience but never needed to resort to it, happily!
In the same vein as practicing mooring, learning how to and practicing sailing without the rudder (or at least without using the helm) is a good thing. Probably more likely to happen that loosing ailerons. Some boats easier than others but the basic idea is simple, foresail pulls the bow off wind, aft brings her up into it.
As happenned to my cousin a couple of years ago on a trip back from Maine to Cape Cod, if you loose your rudder the engine doesn't do much for you. He simply sailed her home right to the mooring.
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Old 14-02-2010, 16:42   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FraidNot View Post

My aviation experience has taught me to always think through the implications and options for uncomfortable scenarios - BEFORE they hit you.

(..)

I do not have the skills or confidence to sail into the marina.
Well, I would not cross sailing into a marina (esp. if you know the marina) off the list. If conditions are OK, you can radio the marina staff, sail in and they will help you with a dinghy (most marinas have very powerful ribs).

If sailing in is a NO/NO, then I would anchor just outside, check out if I can solve the engine issue and then either fix it or else ask for a tow in.

Finally, yes- you can tow in your boat with a dinghy. Still make sure the marina staff knows what you are doing - they will warn other users to keep the channel clear for you.

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Old 14-02-2010, 19:28   #21
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As they say, the 9 hp o/b will get you in in ligher winds, and weaker currents.

Re: sailing in, have a good look at the marina's layout. Then decide what conditions you should not sail in in. You only have to get somewhere you can stop safely (e.g. hanging downwing from pole or cleat), where you can warp into a berth safely. But you also need to know what you will do if someone pulls out ahead of you. At very least, I suggest sounding "D" (one long, two short) as you go in.

You may be able to get a kind soul to raft up & take you in. Remember they are then in control. To improve steering they should position with their stern slightly astern of yours, angled ~10 degrees into your bow. You will need power and brake springs. Suggest you are very clear where they will take you, steer to their directions, and again sound "D" going in.

Have fenders, warps, etc ready for when things go wrong ... but the right answer is often anchor or moor, think, and fix it or seek help from someone you trust.
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Old 14-02-2010, 19:43   #22
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Had very similar circumstance happen to me a while ago, leaving
a protected inner harbor. Right in the middle of a narrow channel
between lighthouse and breakwater motor quits, not a wisp of
wind but the very end of a outgoing tide. Was able to clear channel and breakwater before tide turned and anchor safely.
As said in above posts, short of major engine failure, go through
fuel system, check cooling and for fouled prop. Had manual onboard if needed. Turned out to be recently changed fuel
filter was clogged.
Know your systems, carry manual, spares (that you know will fit) and ...go sailing!
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Old 14-02-2010, 20:08   #23
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9 times out of ten its a fuel bleeding issue. If you are a BoatUS custmer go for Gold towing package $125 a yr unlimited tows no questions - irregardless of distance or number of times used or the reason.
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Old 14-02-2010, 21:16   #24
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Since Larry and I have worked around boatyards a lot, we have often moved relatively large vessels using the yard tender and outboard motor. Two tips - if you plan to tow a boat a short distance, you will find you get far more control by going astern with the outboard motor. If you are tying a tender alongside, position it so the propellor for the outboard motor is astern of the rudder of the yacht. You will find the yacht you are moving goes straighter and is easisr to steer.

One thing I don't see mentioned here is, using warping lines to get the boat into a marina berth. I.e. you could use your dinghy to move close to the marina, then take a line ashore and warp it into the berth you have been assigned.

Lin

P.S. We've put some suggestions for avoiding engine shut downs in the new edition of Capable Cruiser in a chapter called, Engine Quits Drill. Sort of fits this forum topic.
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Old 14-02-2010, 21:31   #25
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Hi Lin, Welcome aboard the forum, our prestige has just gone up a few notches! Great to have you posting here with your insights
and experience. Hugo
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Old 14-02-2010, 21:32   #26
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Originally Posted by Lin Pardey View Post


P.S. We've put some suggestions for avoiding engine shut downs in the new edition of Capable Cruiser in a chapter called, Engine Quits Drill. Sort of fits this forum topic.
Welcome to the forum Lin.
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Old 14-02-2010, 21:50   #27
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Been There, Done That

I have both sailed into my slip more than once, and used the inflatable dinghy rafted to the yachts quarter as described above, more than once, because of engine failure. Clogged filters, and once, a seized coolant pump. Here's what I learned.
  1. I agree with everyone who encourages you to be familiar with changing fuel filters & bleeding your system, as most of the time a simple stall in an otherwise serviceable diesel engine is a result of fuel starvation. I had to learn to do this hove-to outside a marina channel, single-handed, running up to check traffic every two minutes. (New boat, self-delivery of 100mn: good thing I brought tools and filters!). Not recommended. I always have spares and the right tools, and I know where they are.
  2. I always carry a kedge anchor on the stern rail, shackled to rode that is ready to pay out, at a moment's notice. "Ready" means I can pull one Velcro strap, lift the small Danforth out of its cradle, and drop it in in 1.5 sec.
  3. I always have my main up an drawing from the earliest practicable moment after I leave the slip to the last practicable moment before re-entering the slip. I'm under motor only for only a very few minutes out and in. 98% of the time that my engine is running, a stall leaves me still underway. Ghosting along is better than not being under control. Saved me from drifting into a bridge once.
  4. I routinely plan a response to a stalled engine, especially in places of reduced maneuverability and if there is no wind. Can I nose up into the wind a few boatlengths and deploy my kedge? I never motor too close to leeward channel walls, wharves, etc. unless absolutely driven there momentarily. Even a few extra yards can give me time to react and might be the difference between a seaman-like maneuver and a nasty gash on the topsides.
Learning on dinghies and then on a 22' weekender teaches you to dodge around traffic and plan ahead: I'm glad I cut my teeth there before having engine failures in my 30' fin keeler.

In your scenario, you have the fortune of not being in the channel yet: putting down an anchor in a clear spot offers you the luxury of time to consider options and make cool-headed choices. Time to change filters; time to study the marina chart, lash the dinghy to the quarter, discuss communication with your dinghy operator; or time to call Sea Tow (you're glad you spent that $150 at the beginning of the season now, aren't you?).

Fair Winds,
Jeff
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Old 14-02-2010, 23:12   #28
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Welcome to the forum Lin..it truly is an honor.
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Old 15-02-2010, 00:53   #29
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Welcome aboard...

A warm welcome to our Forum, Lin.
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Old 15-02-2010, 00:56   #30
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Second most recent loss of power...

My second most recent loss of power was due to not adding algicide to the diesel, and the subsequent partial blocking of the filters.

Lesson learnt.
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