Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 12-11-2009, 16:22   #1
Don't ask if you can't handle it
 
sailorboy1's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: On the boat somewhere
Boat: Hunter 410
Posts: 12,311
'Easy to Handle' Bigger Boats

Flipping thru a recent issue of CW I can not believe the number of ads for boats 50'+ that are marketed as "easy to sail by a couple". I find this hard to believe to start with, and wonder if the message even the right market targeting. On one ad the people looked like tiny dots in the cockpit under that massive mailsail. But then if I had $2 million I was willing to part with I guess easy to handle would appeal to me (like it sailed itself via voice command interfaces).

Anyone out there have one of these super special sailing wonder boats? Or is it that anyone with such a boat wouldn't catch on a site like this?
__________________

__________________
sailorboy1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2009, 16:53   #2
Senior Cruiser
 
FSMike's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Bahamas/Florida
Boat: Solaris Sunstar 36' catamaran
Posts: 2,654
Images: 5
In these days of power winches and windlasses short handed sailing becomes possible on ever larger boats. I don't think an experienced couple in average health would have much of a problem on a 50 footer. Experience is important and so is the ability to plan ahead. The larger size is just a matter of getting used to it.
You don't try to squeeze large boats into the spaces you put smaller craft, both underway and at the dock.
You probably don't think twice about singlehanding your 39' craft, but it might seem impossible to someone used to a 25 footer.
__________________

__________________
FSMike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2009, 17:06   #3
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: California Coast
Boat: Beneteau Oceanis 331
Posts: 680
50 ft is definately big

50 feet is mucho boat for me. But then it may not be for someone else.
It is really a question of ones age, physical condition, the type of gear that a boat is rigged with and the conditions of the weather.
I have been sailing for 35 years so I have some experience. That also means that I am almost 60 years old and even though I am in pretty good physical condition for my age, I believe that it is prudent to think in terms of "what is the worst that can happen".
If the wind is blowing 15 knots and the seas are kind... sure, my wife and I can handle a modern, well-equipped 50 footer.
If it is blowing 35+ and things begin to go wrong and stuff breaks... I really don't want to be there.
Additionally, in my opinion, I believe that it would be irresponsible of me to put my wife or crew in that situation.
__________________
Liam Wald is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2009, 17:32   #4
Don't ask if you can't handle it
 
sailorboy1's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: On the boat somewhere
Boat: Hunter 410
Posts: 12,311
Well even though I have a 39' boat, a 50 footer sounds HUUUUUGE to me. But when I said the ads were 50+ I was being small, most are 60'+.
__________________
sailorboy1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2009, 17:38   #5
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Tasmania
Boat: VandeStadt IOR 40' - Insatiable
Posts: 2,317
Images: 91
As previouosly mentioned, power winches make a big difference. A bow thruster too, is no longer uncommon on big cruisers.
__________________
Weyalan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2009, 17:42   #6
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: between the devil and the deep blue sea
Boat: a sailing boat
Posts: 17,314
Skye 51 ketch, Amel

No problem for a couple except the main has to be reefed early otherwise too big to handle later (Amel is in mast anyway).

b.
__________________
barnakiel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2009, 18:00   #7
Registered User

Join Date: May 2009
Location: Vancouver, Wash.
Boat: no longer on my Cabo Rico 38 Sanderling
Posts: 1,794
Send a message via MSN to John A
Marketing a product, in this case a sailboat, and reality are almost always,two completely different subjects.

The ads in CW are there to inspire dreams.

Haven't you ever heard a boat broker tell you that "if you can sail in our local waters then you can sail anywhere in the world"? Who the heck can believe them?

People who make their income from commisions sometimes must lie to put food on their families table.
__________________
John A is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2009, 18:09   #8
Registered User
 
markpj23's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Black Hills, SD
Boat: Now Boatless
Posts: 1,148
Images: 47
Bought a 52 mono as a first boat. Had great cockpit layout, electric winches and electric roller furling. The 76 year old couple I bought it from circumnavigated at age 68. The layout / systems were the key.

The cat we bought also has electric winches (OK one, but it's enough) and is the easiest damn boat to sail I've ever been aboard - self tacking jib, all control lines routed nicely to the helm including both reefing lines. I don't have to leave my helm chair to put in or shake out a reef, etc. Wifey stays comfy doing whatever she's doing. Like having a sailboat with an automatic transmission is my analogy....

I looked at lots of boats - couldn't believe the winch layouts of some of the Taiwanese boats from the 70s. Not slamming those hulls, but someone tell me how you short-hand a CT48 or an Island Trader on an extended cruise? Or a Mason? Or a Hudson Force 50? There are well regarded / popular boats (Trader is a motor-sailor of course) that are a real pain to sail. Others love the simplicity of manual winches scattered about the cabin top, cockpit, mast and who knows where else.

So it's a personal choice AND a question of how well things are laid out on a particular boat. So don't be put off by LOA - just go down and see how well the systems are laid out for your cruising style. You could singlehand a shipping container if the rig and control lines were well thought out.

My humble $0.02.....

__________________
Mark
markpj23 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2009, 18:18   #9
Registered User
 
bewitched's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 885
Images: 3
Used to race & deliver a 61 ft X-yacht. No power assistance. We had two per watch and with the exception of symetrical spinakers (which we didn't use on delivery anyway) there wasn't anything we couldn't do (sailing wise) with only two.

Was it easy? - no - it was bloody hard work - lifting the main took all 4 of us, getting a new headsail on deck required winching it up from the sail locker with a halyard, getting someone up the mast was a workout from hell.

You can do it with two - presumably a couple - but what happens it he picks up an injury and she has to reef the main? - now you're in a pickle....
__________________
bewitched is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2009, 18:29   #10
Registered User
 
svHyLyte's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Tampa Bay area, USA
Boat: Beneteau First 42
Posts: 3,434
Images: 25
Quote:
The 76 year old couple I bought it from circumnavigated at age 68. The layout / systems were the key.
So, ah..., Mark...

Is your $.02 implying that age 68 is old or something?
__________________
"It is not so much for its beauty that the Sea makes a claim upon men's hearts, as for that subtle something, that quality of air, that emanation from the waves, that so wonderfully renews a weary spirit."
svHyLyte is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2009, 18:37   #11
Registered User
 
markpj23's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Black Hills, SD
Boat: Now Boatless
Posts: 1,148
Images: 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by svHyLyte View Post
So, ah..., Mark...

Is your $.02 implying that age 68 is old or something?
Hee hee...... not me, man......
__________________
Mark
markpj23 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2009, 21:25   #12
Senior Cruiser
 
bstreep's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: San Antonio, TX/Port Aransas, TX
Boat: 1990 Macintosh 47, "Merlin"
Posts: 2,274
We have a 47' boat. When we "entertain", we ask the guests to just hang out. Except in rare instances (when the guests are good sailors), we have our processes and techniques so well down, we prefer if they don't help. It's just automatic for us.

And yes, with in-boom furling, that electric winch DOES help.

BTW, with the electric BAR, the guests quickly learn how to make adult beverages on their own.
__________________
Bill Streep
San Antonio/Port Aransas, TX
bstreep is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-11-2009, 06:43   #13
Registered User
 
denverd0n's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Tampa, FL
Posts: 3,951
Images: 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Weyalan
As previouosly mentioned, power winches make a big difference. A bow thruster too, is no longer uncommon on big cruisers.
Exactly. With these kinds of modern aids a couple can handle a 50-footer pretty easily. Of course the obvious question is, what will that couple do if they are out in a serious blow and the power winch on that gigantic mainsail fails?
__________________
denverd0n is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-11-2009, 06:54   #14
Registered User
 
speciald@ocens.'s Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: On the boat - Carib, Chesapeake
Boat: 58 Taswell AS
Posts: 1,139
We are over 60 and sail our 58 ft, 60,000 pound boat by ourselves most of the time. Electric winches, roller furling boom, bow thruster make this boat easier to sail than my C&C 40 without these convieniences. Can't keep it from hitting a piling and docking without deck hands can be a challenge some times but otherwise it is easy to handle.We just arrived in the Caribbean after a 6+ day passage from Hampton, VA. For the passage we did have crew but could have done without tham.
__________________
speciald@ocens. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-11-2009, 07:50   #15
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Ohio
Posts: 2,313
My wife and I own and sail a 61 footer and there are quite a few on this site with larger boats. Ours is easy to sail but can be hateful to dock if it blowing over 30.

We have electric winches and big heavy sails but other then the start and end of the season they live on the spars. Setting the assy takes me about 15 minutes, the hardest part is lifting 150 pounds out of the sail locker, over my head, onto the deck. I'm 6'5", +200#. The boat works for us but may not be the right boat for others.

Mrs. Joli working on a rigging issue, second spreader, ~50 of the water. WS 15, BS 10, sea state 3 foot.

__________________

__________________
Joli is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bigger Carb = More Power? theonecalledtom Auxiliary Equipment & Dinghy 16 28-10-2009 12:28
Is it Possible to Put a Bigger Propshaft on My Bertram 42? pascal bertram Propellers & Drive Systems 5 25-10-2009 12:33
DO BIGGER ADDS= MORE CLICKS mojo Off Topic Forum 5 28-09-2008 22:40
Finally took the plunge to a bigger boat Doghouse Monohull Sailboats 11 19-08-2008 10:06
Making holes in GRP bigger Talisker Construction, Maintenance & Refit 15 22-09-2007 11:40



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 12:29.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.