Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 28-02-2010, 07:10   #76
Moderator Emeritus
 
Pblais's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Hayes, VA
Boat: Gozzard 36
Posts: 8,700
Images: 15
Send a message via Skype™ to Pblais
Quote:
Remember to have as much fun as you can when looking for a boat. Look at boat you can't really afford then look as some that are well under what your budget is. It really gives you perspective as to what is doable and what is not.
Great advice. Fun and understanding lead to happy boating and knowing which boat really is for you. It should start out fun if you expect it to stay that way. Remembering that it really was all supposed to be fun can help on those days when confusion and frustration might be weighing heavy.

As for the day dreaming, it took us 5 years to find Bright Eyes but we sailed and loved our first boat just fine too. It's good to think you can do better.
__________________

__________________
Paul Blais
s/v Bright Eyes Gozzard 36
37 15.7 N 76 28.9 W
Pblais is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-08-2010, 14:52   #77
Eternal Member
 
capt_douglas's Avatar

Join Date: May 2003
Location: Ft. Lauderdale, FL
Boat: Vancouver 36 cutter????
Posts: 620
Send a message via Skype™ to capt_douglas
I bought my first boat after looking at three. I knew the POs and knew the boat well so it wasn't like I didn't know the boat.

Fast forward to 2010 and I'm about a year into the search, have actually accumulated some air miles, dumped a lot of tanks of gas into the Jeep, and while I'm closer, I'm not there yet. I do know what I don't want and perhaps more importantly, where to look on the boats I'm interested in.

My current dilemma is that a bid I got rejected on has dropped the sale price $8K in a few months and now looks appetizing. The problem is while it has a blue water pedigree it has... issues.

I've done a lot of reading, research, and crawling but there are boats out there that have high recommendations but aren't for sale (or don't last long enough for the ink to dry on the contract). Those really intrigue me.

Having done the older boat once before I know what I'm getting into, but I'd probably tear a newer one apart as well. I want to sleep at night and not knowing every inch of my new home keeps me wondering at night.
__________________

__________________
Capt. Douglas Abbott
USCG/MCA IV/M.I./C.I. 500-ton Oceans
capt_douglas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-08-2010, 00:24   #78
Registered User
 
First Mate's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Puget Sound, WA
Boat: Far From Turtle: 1980 Pearson 424 cutter rigged ketch
Posts: 326
keep an open mind

Quote:
Originally Posted by capt_douglas View Post
I bought my first boat after looking at three. I knew the POs and knew the boat well so it wasn't like I didn't know the boat.

Fast forward to 2010 and I'm about a year into the search, have actually accumulated some air miles, dumped a lot of tanks of gas into the Jeep, and while I'm closer, I'm not there yet. I do know what I don't want and perhaps more importantly, where to look on the boats I'm interested in.

My current dilemma is that a bid I got rejected on has dropped the sale price $8K in a few months and now looks appetizing. The problem is while it has a blue water pedigree it has... issues.

I've done a lot of reading, research, and crawling but there are boats out there that have high recommendations but aren't for sale (or don't last long enough for the ink to dry on the contract). Those really intrigue me.

Having done the older boat once before I know what I'm getting into, but I'd probably tear a newer one apart as well. I want to sleep at night and not knowing every inch of my new home keeps me wondering at night.
after nearly 3 years of searching, we have finally put money down on a boat. We wanted a catamaran to sail the Caribbean. Instead, we are buying a classic monohull and sailing the Pacific NW. We can't wait to close the deal and get on this classic, 1981 42' monohull located on the border with Canada.

That said, check out the Fast Passage 39 in Anacortes WA on yachtworld.

1980 Fast Passage Cutter Sail Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com

40 of these boats were manufactured in Canada. We were on the one in Anacortes, WA and almost bought it. Because the cockpit is just a little bit smaller to accommodate ocean passages, we didn't buy it. We want a large cockpit to loll around in as our boat will be a live aboard. The difference in cockpit size is put into interior space.

This boat in Anacortes is one of the cleanest and prettiest boats we have seen in 3 years of looking. The cabinet work is some of the nicest and most professional of any I have seen during this search. It was tough to walk away from that boat.

It is reasonably priced and has no projects.

If you can change where you are looking and consider a slightly different boat model, you may suddenly find you are very happy with your new choices.

We have found the boats in the Pacific NW to be in somewhat better condition than Florida, as a generality, because the tropical sun is so hard on boats. It's nice to get up here and see these older boats in good shape.

Just a suggestion.

Good luck with your search.
__________________
First Mate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-08-2010, 16:47   #79
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 36
I have a sagitta 30, which replaced a Columbia 43 sailboat since I left California in 2005. I enjoyed both, but it's much easier to purchase a boat when you have "one foot in the water" so to speak. It's like not working out at the gym for awhile-you might not be willing to take the first step or you might be doing your homework (a good thing).

Everything about cruising takes time. An average day in the Carrib or Central America means you can only put one thing on your to do list in twenty four hours. Your task would be considered a very big step-finding the right boat. But why not just fly down to the crusing latitudes and buy a junker? I can tell you of many that are ready to move. A new boat can be a junker in 120 days without attendance anyways.

I am really glad I don't have the maintenance and worry of a larger boat. But it can go either way. I come back to the US to work four months out the year- so I am really a shoestring sailor. Recently, I wanted to take a full-time job on the West Coast so I may need to consider selling her. Maybe $23,000.00- it's a good boat. If I can get the time off from this new job offer, i would sail her to the Gulf Coast, put her on a trailer and bring her to the West Coast to start over in a few years.

Anybody interested in a boat for sale on the Costa Rica border (Atlantic)? Actually, I haven't decided to keep cruising or not. Cruising takes time, and I have lost some of the patience required. Good luck on your search.
__________________

__________________
captainteacup is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
So how long is long enough Reluctantsailor Sailor Logs & Cruising Plans 30 19-01-2014 17:42
fg how long ksmith Construction, Maintenance & Refit 13 08-08-2008 13:23
How long did it take? Brandywine Multihull Sailboats 17 18-08-2007 19:23
At long last amendelson General Sailing Forum 2 27-03-2007 12:43
so long tauras General Sailing Forum 4 23-11-2005 09:41



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 22:26.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.