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Old 29-06-2014, 17:18   #16
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Re: Dinghies

The Tinker. A dinghy that safely takes 4 adults. Planes well and rows exceptional well. They are not made new any more as far as i know but they are sold second hand. Made of Hypalon so they last forever. Can be packed up or stored. Well engineered.
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Old 29-06-2014, 17:46   #17
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Re: Dinghies

In that case, I would think a regular old roll up inflatable and <5hp would be fine. With a 4.25' draft you'll be able to get a lot closer to shore than the bigger boats. Other advantages of this approach are that it's light, you can deflate it when going offshore, and it's cheap so not the end of the world if you hate it. Inflatables aren't that bad. If the dock/beach look pokey just set a stern anchor to hold you off.

I wouldn't bother with a RIB, but they're not as bad as you think. Single floor fiberglass RIB, OB and gas is more like 200lbs and 2k+ for a used one.
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Old 29-06-2014, 18:36   #18
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Re: Dinghies

A roll up inflatable. Hypalon, not pvc. Achilles makes an excellent one. Small outboard, say 4hp or less.

Or for outright ruggedness, seriously consider an 8 foot portabote.

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Old 29-06-2014, 20:00   #19
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Re: Dinghies

We live aboard and own a Portland Pudgy with a 2 HP honda. It has been a great little launch. I have ringed the Pudgy with fenders to make it scratch proofed against the hull when laying at anchor or on our full time mooring.

The Portland Pudgy is rugged and unsinkable. The small outboard rating allows for easy engine transfer and deployment to the pushpit without rigging while underway. Oars stow safely and airtight in the hull as well as your ditch bag and other survival items. A lifeboat rig can be purchased as well as a sail rig. All stow-able inside the hull structure. We own the basic boat, which comes with oars, locking oarlocks, and a built in Ritchie compass. It is manageable for two with a heavy to a and fro payload aboard, but is not a boat for more bodies comfortably, other than in an emergency situation.

You can drag this plastic boat over things that would make a RIB owner cringe. At 6'4', 200+lbs, I can stand on the rail without being close to shipping water.

Given that review... I have also owned a 10ft, inflatable keeled Zodiak with an 8hp Merc, 4stroke. I sold this boat, as it was un-manageable with the small H-23 Herreschoff owned prior to my current 32' Ted Brewer designed off-shore cutter. Hindsight being what it is, I wish I had the forethought to keep the Zodiak.

The ability to plane is a luxury and obviously a safety issue in remote anchorages and large mooring fields. Stability in RIBS is unmatched (although the Pudgy is very stable) and towing aspects appear to be good. Hypalon seems to be the "go to" for southern climes, but is pricey.

If I had to start from scratch... I'd visit the RIB and a suitable HP... if you can manage one on deck as davits and towing are not for serious off-shore passages.

We'll continue with the "Pudgy" for now... it's part of the family and loved.
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Old 29-06-2014, 20:23   #20
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Re: Dinghies

A new 9 foot Aluminum AB RIB weighs around 80 pounds and sells for around $3500. A used 8hp 2-stroke weighs around 60 pounds and sells for around $1000. That motor can easily plane up that dinghy with 2 people on it. You may also find a used Nissan/Tohatsu 9.8hp 2-stroke that weighs 60 pounds that can plane up 3 people on that dink for about the same price.

You can easily lift that dinghy on board via halyard and store it upside down on the foredeck. You will really appreciate the stability and rough water capability of even a small RIB compared to non-inflatable dinks.
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Old 29-06-2014, 20:28   #21
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You may consider an inflatable floor inflatable. Very light and easy to plane. I can plane in my 9 footer with a 3.3 hp at 10 knots. Very stable.
Downside of course is lack of abrasion resistance, but so easy to lift we don't drag it much. I would ideally upgrade to a 6 hp so I could plane with passengers.
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Old 29-06-2014, 22:00   #22
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Re: Dinghies

Quote:
Originally Posted by climber49 View Post
I recently purchased a 39 ft. Island Packet. Where I cruise I need to anchor out in shallow water so I need a dinghy. I'm looking at three possibilities:

1. Portland Pudgy
2. Porteboat
3. RIB

From what I've seen on this forum the Porteboats are highly rated but I haven't seen anything on the Portland Pudgy. I will either need to tow the dinghy or store it folded up. I don't know if I have enough room to store the folded Porteboat.

If I tow the dinghy I need to be able to haul it out of the water for storage when at home. The Pudgy is heavier than the Porteboat. On the other hand, the Pudgy looks good as a lifeboat.

The general consensus is to stay away from the inflatables. I would like an 8 - 10 ft dinghy and an RIB that small may not be very stable or dry.

Anyone have any opinions? Thanks.

Climber49
Quote:
Originally Posted by climber49 View Post
First of all, my apologies for a typo. My boat is 29 ft. long, not 39 ft.

There is a thread from earlier this year where most people said they preferred a rigid dinghy.

Most of the RIBs I've looked at are very heavy and expensive - $7000 - $10000. That includes a motor in most cases. I don't know that I can handle a 300+ pound RIB by myself.

Davits on my boat will block the transom access ladder making it very difficult to get on board.

I'm still looking - any more ideas? I appreciate the feedback.
I laugh at the pudgy being a rescue platform. They row poorly, plane pathetically and are expensive.
You'll find many "experts" pushing the RIB's. But remember, they too are only inflatables. On the cruiser nets in Mx, there would be at least 1 person a day with an inflatable asking where the repair center in La Paz was. Let's face it...they end up leaking...all of them...eventually. When I question the owners, it's always the same..."Oh just a few leaks over the years...easy fix". RIB's are heavy. So heavy, in fact, I can't imagine not having davits for one. On a 29ft. vessel I doubt you can afford the weight hung off the stern.
I've had inflatables, hard dinghy's and folding, over the years. I currently have a 7 1/2' Livingston with a 6hp. Tohatsu...4 stroke. Oh yes 4 stroke...the ultimate sin on CF. I can muscle both myself with the aid of my crane off the back of the boat. The thing will plane to scare you and sips fuel. So the whole "you need a 15hp and RIB to get anywhere" goes out the window. I bought the Livingston for $250. My only peeve with it, is it takes up the entire fore deck and is difficult to see over it. So this year I bought a 10' Portabote. It will also plane with the 6hp.
I had a Kayak on the side of my HR35, held by Garhaur Kayak racks. I will put the Portabote there since I never used the Kayak. So now I will gain visibility and only have to assemble it on deck, then toss it in the water. I can pick it up by myself. It's lighter than the Livingston.
You are part of a dying breed...Cruisers with boats under 35 ft. So true...if you have a 45 plus footer boat an RIB might be a logical choice. But 29ft., you have a challenge on your hands.
If you're like me a windvane off the transom is a real asset and davits would kill that idea. Hope this helps.
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Old 29-06-2014, 23:07   #23
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Re: Dinghies

Well, I gotta agree that my thoughts are changed along with the size of your boat! When we cruised in our Yankee 30 (not long term, only vacation trips of a few weeks up and down the California coast) we had an Achilles 8 foot soft transom dink. It was slow (oars only), wet (small tube diameter) and death to carry much in. But it would nearly disappear when you deflated and rolled it up. It was all that we could manage on that boat, but we lusted after something better.

So, let me withdraw my recommendation for the RIB/15, and grudgingly say that an air floor or even a soft transom boat would likely be better for you.

Now, an opinion: I don't like the fold-a-boats. I've borrowed them from other cruisers and found that I did not like the way they felt, that they rowed or that they motored. One close friend with a Golden Hind 30 used one for some years, Mexico to Australia and points in between and back and forth. Always said how good it was. But now, back in Mexico again, they have purchased a smallish RIB... and they admit that it is far superior for THEIR use. May not be true for everyone...

I am reminded of a quotation, I believe from one of the earlier Herreschoffs: when asked how big a boat they needed to go cruising, he responded "big enough to have a tender that will carry the entire crew, and room to stow it on deck". Not many of us can make that claim without some form of collapsible boat (or a very small crew!).

And finally, for Celestial: I've never heard of a Livingston dinghy, so perhaps you could elaborate a bit. But I'm hard pressed to believe that any 7 1/2 foot dink could be much of a crew or load carrier. With 6 HP I can believe that it would go like stink, though! I think that I said that one does not NEED the RIB/15 to cruise, but that is what a lot of long termers end up with. Perhaps it is the herd thing, or perhaps it really fits the bill well. Has worked well for us and many of our associates out here. Oh BTW, Ann and I can easily get the Yamaha 15 off and on with our main halyard, and get the boat on the foredeck with the spinny halyard. I have of necessity done it solo a couple of times, but it is a PITA. Smaller boat would be easier to get on deck, no doubt about that, but it is doable, even for old farts!

Cheers,

Jim
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Old 29-06-2014, 23:28   #24
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Re: Dinghies

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Cate View Post
Well, I gotta agree that my thoughts are changed along with the size of your boat! When we cruised in our Yankee 30 (not long term, only vacation trips of a few weeks up and down the California coast) we had an Achilles 8 foot soft transom dink. It was slow (oars only), wet (small tube diameter) and death to carry much in. But it would nearly disappear when you deflated and rolled it up. It was all that we could manage on that boat, but we lusted after something better.

So, let me withdraw my recommendation for the RIB/15, and grudgingly say that an air floor or even a soft transom boat would likely be better for you.

Now, an opinion: I don't like the fold-a-boats. I've borrowed them from other cruisers and found that I did not like the way they felt, that they rowed or that they motored. One close friend with a Golden Hind 30 used one for some years, Mexico to Australia and points in between and back and forth. Always said how good it was. But now, back in Mexico again, they have purchased a smallish RIB... and they admit that it is far superior for THEIR use. May not be true for everyone...

I am reminded of a quotation, I believe from one of the earlier Herreschoffs: when asked how big a boat they needed to go cruising, he responded "big enough to have a tender that will carry the entire crew, and room to stow it on deck". Not many of us can make that claim without some form of collapsible boat (or a very small crew!).

And finally, for Celestial: I've never heard of a Livingston dinghy, so perhaps you could elaborate a bit. But I'm hard pressed to believe that any 7 1/2 foot dink could be much of a crew or load carrier. With 6 HP I can believe that it would go like stink, though! I think that I said that one does not NEED the RIB/15 to cruise, but that is what a lot of long termers end up with. Perhaps it is the herd thing, or perhaps it really fits the bill well. Has worked well for us and many of our associates out here. Oh BTW, Ann and I can easily get the Yamaha 15 off and on with our main halyard, and get the boat on the foredeck with the spinny halyard. I have of necessity done it solo a couple of times, but it is a PITA. Smaller boat would be easier to get on deck, no doubt about that, but it is doable, even for old farts!

Cheers,

Jim
The proof is in the pudding. That said...My crew is either 1 or 2 on a 35' boat. Here
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Old 29-06-2014, 23:51   #25
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Re: Dinghies

OK, now I know that it is a hard dinghy with a tunnel or sorta cat hull shape. It obviously serves your purposes well.

Kinda covers a lot of your foredeck, though... makes me wonder how it would possibly fit on a 29 foot vessel? Really, some sort of collapsible (fold or deflate) boat seems more likely for such a small yacht.

I'll back out now. Everyone needs to work out their own priorities when it comes to such compromise laden issues as dinghies!

Cheers,

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Old 30-06-2014, 00:09   #26
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Re: Dinghies

Quote:
Originally Posted by climber49 View Post
First of all, my apologies for a typo. My boat is 29 ft. long, not 39 ft.

There is a thread from earlier this year where most people said they preferred a rigid dinghy.

Most of the RIBs I've looked at are very heavy and expensive - $7000 - $10000. That includes a motor in most cases. I don't know that I can handle a 300+ pound RIB by myself.

Davits on my boat will block the transom access ladder making it very difficult to get on board.

I'm still looking - any more ideas? I appreciate the feedback.
On a 29' boat, I think you will want an air deck type inflatable, not a RIB. If you can store it inflated and inverted on the foredeck, you are ahead of the game, but on a boat that size you will probably be looking at inflating and deflating it every time.

As others have said, inflatables are far more stable than the same size of other types of dinghies. I have a RIB and a hard rowing dinghy, and the difference is incredible. The hard rowing dinghy is pretty and rows well, but is somewhat terrifying to get into and out of.

PortaBote might be an option; stores very well on the rail, rows (or rather paddles) well, but far less stable than an inflatable.

Portland Pudgy and similar boats are going to be almost impossible to store on your boat I think.

Good luck.
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Old 30-06-2014, 00:12   #27
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Re: Dinghies

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Originally Posted by Celestialsailor View Post
The proof is in the pudding. That said...My crew is either 1 or 2 on a 35' boat. Here
Ah it's a Cat.

And we know that a given length cat equates to a monohull half as long again, so it's more like an 11ft tender
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Old 30-06-2014, 00:26   #28
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Re: Dinghies

Yes...it's damn stable and really worked well on my Ingrid 38.
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Old 30-06-2014, 01:08   #29
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Re: Dinghies

Oh the burning question the person who can make the ideal tender will be very rich. on that I just bought No6 trial its a Walker Bay as im about to head to Tassy I also got the sail and 4 chamber inflatable tubes to use as my life raft if needed.
It seems a good boat but I will not know till I start using it, I will have to place it on my foredeck but I do that now and I have never found a better place to store it yet.
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Old 30-06-2014, 06:26   #30
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Re: Dinghies

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The general consensus is to stay away from the inflatables. I would like an 8 - 10 ft dinghy and an RIB that small may not be very stable or dry.

Consensus of who?

I'll chime in with a "probably your best bet is a roll-up Hypalon inflatable."

The air floor reduces weight, so you can cope with a longer dinghy... and benefit from the extra space inside. The bigger inflatable will be even more stable than a smaller one. It won't row for squat -- most inflatables including RIBs don't (usually because of flex at the oarlocks) -- but everything else about it should work for you. Tow when you can, deflate and bring aboard when you must.

If the flexible material worries you... I can tell we carried our big dogs (100+ pounds) all over the place, and they didn't mind scrambling all over the tubes getting in and out. Even with our PVC unit at the time, no issues with toenail punctures, etc.

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