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Old 20-02-2015, 16:09   #91
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Re: Difference Between Coastal And Blue Water Cruising

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Originally Posted by letsgetsailing3 View Post
I think you guys are missing the entire concept that she was making an entertaining video. I remember there was a Gilligan's Island episode with a similar scene.
I get it, and also saw the Gilligan's Island episode when it first aired. But I needed a video to illustrate my point.


Were they also making an "entertaining video" in the second video of the series when their rudder came loose?
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Old 20-02-2015, 16:22   #92
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Re: Difference Between Coastal And Blue Water Cruising

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We've also sailed the English channel, then crossed the Bay of Biscay, sailed down around Portugal and Spain. Several passages back and forth across the Med. Not every day has been calm and easy.

So, coastal cruising?
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Old 20-02-2015, 16:24   #93
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Re: Difference Between Coastal And Blue Water Cruising

The Med can be far from pleasant off the East Coast of Spain. Vicious swells and no food desired by anyone. Cant cook, Wont cook..... too dangerous.

The first time I sailed in bad weather on Catamaran...... I had no idea the weather was so bad outside........ I was cooking and prepping... it was only when I went to the cockpit and saw the huge waves did I realise how comfortable I was relatively.......so not being one to spoil a good thing, I went back inside

I love monohulls......... but that day showed me that I liked stability in my life.........
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Old 20-02-2015, 16:29   #94
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Re: Difference Between Coastal And Blue Water Cruising

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We've also sailed the English channel, then crossed the Bay of Biscay, sailed down around Portugal and Spain. Several passages back and forth across the Med. Not every day has been calm and easy. Our original plan was to immediately bring the boat across the Atlantic from England then spend a few seasons sailing up to Canada, Newfoundland and off New England. We planned for the worst conditions, purchased a boat best suited for our expected needs, then changed our mind and decided to take a left turn into the Med. Plans changed.


We'll probably even do a Dockhead type Baltic cruise after 3-4 more years in the Med before coming across to the Americas.


When we live on a boat full-time for 5-6 months of the year on the hook, there's no such thing as only being on the boat and sailing in picture perfect weather windows. Sometimes the weather unexpectedly turns foul and once in a while we have deadlines and planes to catch.
Don't be bothered. I'm just messing with you. But I do think you should take it easy on those who choose a different brand of boat, as they are likely doing the same kind of sailing as you. I've been in some pretty rough weather in the Med...

I believe all of the boats we're discussing are capable vessels, and all will have equipment that breaks -- even Oysters! They're great boats, by the way...
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Old 20-02-2015, 16:49   #95
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Re: Difference Between Coastal And Blue Water Cruising

I'm not trying to promote Oysters or knock any brand of boat, just trying to demonstrate how important hand holds are to those who don't seem to see the need for them when considering the whole blue water thing. The original question by the OP: Differences between coastal and blue water... just trying to answer the question the best way I can.

The two fellows in the one video, aren't on an Oyster. I don't know what kind of boat it is, nor does it matter, but it does have well-placed hand holds, which is why I chose to use it.


BTW: Thanks for 'splaining that you were messin'
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Old 20-02-2015, 19:18   #96
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Re: Difference Between Coastal And Blue Water Cruising

I think of coastal cruising as cruising when you can seek shelter if the weather is going to fall apart; blue water I think of as when you are too far away for shelter, probably for immediate rescue. But I've never been that far out so this definition might not work.

Any good size body of water can get nasty. Try Lake Michigan on a bad day!
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Old 20-02-2015, 19:23   #97
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Re: Difference Between Coastal And Blue Water Cruising

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I think of coastal cruising as cruising when you can seek shelter if the weather is going to fall apart; blue water I think of as when you are too far away for shelter, probably for immediate rescue. But I've never been that far out so this definition might not work.

Any good size body of water can get nasty. Try Lake Michigan on a bad day!
'good point here! Relatively shallow bodies of inland water can become tumultuous places, but the safety net of coastal cruising and weather forecasts keeps all but the total idiots from suffering in these nasty events!
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Old 20-02-2015, 20:45   #98
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Re: Difference Between Coastal And Blue Water Cruising

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Originally Posted by Pendragon35 View Post
I think of coastal cruising as cruising when you can seek shelter if the weather is going to fall apart; blue water I think of as when you are too far away for shelter, probably for immediate rescue. But I've never been that far out so this definition might not work.

Any good size body of water can get nasty. Try Lake Michigan on a bad day!
I think that's a pretty reasonable suggestion that sits best with me and also fits in with our local marine safety laws.
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Old 21-02-2015, 05:04   #99
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Re: Difference Between Coastal And Blue Water Cruising

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Any good size body of water can get nasty. Try Lake Michigan on a bad day!
I have, more than once. The sandwich video would have been a lot worse in that weather.

While I consider handholds an important safety factor, when working below you sometimes need two hands to do the work, so you have to brace yourself against something while you work. Keno's comment about the U-shaped galley is an example of good design resulting in a safe and workable environment on a boat.

When I was at the Annapolis boat show and stepped aboard a Beneteau Sense, my first thought when looking at the wide expanse of the cockpit was being on one side when the boat lurches and seeing nothing to stop me from being hurled to the other side. When we walked a Halberg Rassey, I couldn't find anyplace I considered dangerous in a lurch. You can get tossed around coastal cruising just as easily as when on open water, so these wide open layouts really aren't designed for either.

But if you spend a lot of time at the local harbor, you'll probably find few boats going out at all, even for a day sail. It seems when a boat engine fires up, everyone around acts like it's an unusual event and stops what they are doing to see who's leaving the dock. The only time I see a lot of boat slips empty is when there's some event to go see - fireworks, races, air shows, things like that.

If you will spend most of your time on your boat at the dock or put-putting around on calm waters, you don't need a boat designed for destination traveling. So these wide open designs are perfect. But if you will be traveling and subjected to whatever weather comes your way, wide expanses that allow for flying bodies should be avoided.
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Old 21-02-2015, 06:16   #100
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So, coastal cruising?
English Channel and Bay of Biscay is some of the toughest water in the Northern Hemisphere. I believe that was Kens point.
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Old 21-02-2015, 06:20   #101
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Originally Posted by Pendragon35 View Post
I think of coastal cruising as cruising when you can seek shelter if the weather is going to fall apart; blue water I think of as when you are too far away for shelter, probably for immediate rescue. But I've never been that far out so this definition might not work.

Any good size body of water can get nasty. Try Lake Michigan on a bad day!
Also my definition.

Agree with all of this. "Blue water" doesn't mean, necessarily, "tough water". On the contrary, most of the problems happen with the hard bits, i.e. land, nearby. "Blue water", at moderate latitudes, means greater autonomy, not harder sailing. It's a different challenge.
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Old 21-02-2015, 06:30   #102
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Re: Difference Between Coastal And Blue Water Cruising

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'good point here! Relatively shallow bodies of inland water can become tumultuous places, but the safety net of coastal cruising and weather forecasts keeps all but the total idiots from suffering in these nasty events!
Then I guess you'd have to place us and most of the regulars we know who spend any significant time on their boats firmly in the "total idiots" camp. Even with the much improved weather forecasts and all the radio and Internet receiving gear we have onboard, we've been caught out many times by unexpected weather. What's actually out there, can be quite different that the forecast.

I believe Dockhead spent a few weeks visiting our "total idiots" camp late last summer whilst bashing to weather, bringing his boat back to the UK.
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Old 21-02-2015, 07:17   #103
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Re: Difference Between Coastal And Blue Water Cruising

We live on the west coast of Florida & we love boating in the summer. However, the forecast if for scattered thunderstorms, some of them quite violent, pretty much every day. If you have a very fast boat you can try to dodge them but in a sailboat or trawler you're gonna get caught regularly. Other than the lightning, I'll bet I'm not alone is saying I love the rough weather.
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Old 21-02-2015, 07:23   #104
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Re: Difference Between Coastal And Blue Water Cruising

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English Channel and Bay of Biscay is some of the toughest water in the Northern Hemisphere. I believe that was Kens point.
Is anyone suggesting that a Beneteau can't cross the English Channel?

The English Channel is nothing to be trifled with, but no body of water is, which is why weather windows are so important. The Mediterranean can be crazy challenging one day, and relatively calm 24 hours later. The gulf coast of Florida is also like that. The term for sailing on these waters? Coastal cruising.

Regarding the video of La Vagabonde, Elayna was making a joke about the difficulty of making a sandwich at sea. It was a playful video of putting plates and a pickle jar on an open table in the middle of the cabin at sea, and watching the stuff slide around. You would have had the same results in any boat under the same conditions -- and they weren't even particularly rough conditions. It wasn't that the Beneteau doesn't have any handholds, or isn't up to the task in any way. I think we'll find out soon if it is, as they intend to take that boat across the Atlantic in short order.
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Old 21-02-2015, 07:36   #105
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Re: Difference Between Coastal And Blue Water Cruising

Yes, that is exactly what I am saying, Beneteaus cannot cross the English Channel! Hunter's can because, as we all know, there are plenty of Hunters sailing around the world.


Actually, I think the point is you can't count on weather windows. If you are in a boat you need to be prepared for rough weather because sooner or later you will be caught in it.
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