Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 10-09-2012, 21:29   #91
Senior Cruiser
 
Jim Cate's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2008
Location: cruising SW Pacific
Boat: Jon Sayer 1-off 46 ft fract rig sloop strip plank in W Red Cedar
Posts: 11,467
Re: Derelict Boats - Not Florida

G'Day all,

Interesting stuff! And yes, that boat does not look to be well maintained, but...

To my eyes, the photos don't show enough detail to make much of a judgement. Yep, there is visible rust, there is what appears to be lots of bird poop on everything, and it according to the OP has not been maintained at all for some years. Yet she floats roughly on her lines, she has a rig that was stowed carefully (maybe) of unknown completeness, and has god knows what below decks. Perhaps it isn't so bad below, since apparently it well enough sealed up that she hasn't sunk from rain accumulation.At any rate, I'd suspect that one could get her seaworthy for less money than starting from scratch. Not a job that I would undertake, but then I haven't ever felt like building from scratch either, and others frequently do just that.

And despite the appearance of her hull, I have seen vessels in commercial service as inter-island ferries (in Tonga for example) that were far worse in terms of rust, dilapidation and general poor appearance. Folks PAY to go on them ( I wouldn't go on one if they paid ME but I am a coward about OPBs).

The issue of abandoned property is thorny, and exists on land as well. I don't know what the answer is here, but seems to me that towing and sinking offshore (for those that still float) is perhaps less of an environmental disaster than commonly stated. During WW2 millions of tons of shipping were sunk, often with huge cargoes of what would now be called toxic stuff and the sea seems to have survived that ok. A few hundreds of tons of derelict yachts might not cause that much of a problem if viewed realistically rather than emotionally. Oh, and at 5 bucks a gallon, pumping out any fuel prior to scuttling might be fiscally sound too!

Enough -- I don't like to see things like this boat either!

Cheers,

Jim
__________________

__________________
Jim and Ann s/v Insatiable II , lying Port Cygnet, Tasmania once again
Jim Cate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2012, 22:27   #92
Registered User
 
callmecrazy's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2010
Boat: Tartan 30
Posts: 1,548
Images: 1
Re: Derelict Boats - Not Florida

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Cate View Post

The issue of abandoned property is thorny, and exists on land as well. I don't know what the answer is here, but seems to me that towing and sinking offshore (for those that still float) is perhaps less of an environmental disaster than commonly stated. During WW2 millions of tons of shipping were sunk, often with huge cargoes of what would now be called toxic stuff and the sea seems to have survived that ok. A few hundreds of tons of derelict yachts might not cause that much of a problem if viewed realistically rather than emotionally. Oh, and at 5 bucks a gallon, pumping out any fuel prior to scuttling might be fiscally sound too!

Enough -- I don't like to see things like this boat either!

Cheers,

Jim

But! If we towed them and sank them, how could we account for the millions of dollars we get from both the federal government and private resources to fix this 'problem'?

That would be too much like right.... what's better is, we need a way to make those people look like assholes, while we report the costs as high as possible so 'the people' will think we're doing them an incredibly great service everytime we remove one boat, even if it's once a year.... Meanwhile, we could make a fist-full of cash by pretending like the problem doesn't even exist until somebody actually says something.... sound like a plan?
__________________

__________________
My Blog
callmecrazy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2012, 01:02   #93
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 147
Re: Derelict Boats - Not Florida

It's so sad the way things have gone.
When an apparently abandoned boat with nice lines is nothing more than an eyesore to those who own the ugliest, cookie cutter, characterless boats, I feel so disheartened.
I saw the launching of the very first production fiberglass sailboats in Sausalito in the early 60's, while working and sailing on vessels such boats as Wanderer, Yankee (SF woody, not Irving Johnson's), Baruna, schooner Atlantic, Wander Bird and Viveka. I hated the smell, the Formica look and feel of the interiors and complete lack of character of those boats, even though they were designed and built by real craftsmen with care and attention to detail.
Well 50+ years later I'm sailing a plastic boat and though she does not have the graceful lines of many of my previous boats, she is low maintenance, fast as hell for a heavy displacement boat and strong enough to take a strike from a container in a gale in the North Atlantic, without damage. And I am sailing her a whole lot more than I would be a beautiful old classic, steel or otherwise.
I don't want that steely, but I grieve for her and what she could be, or at least should be; a loved, comfortable, safe vessel making her way into an exotic anchorage.
I got the impression that Don only gives a damn because he cannot be anchored (moored) where she is.
And not to beat a dead horse, steelies are very easy to repair; cut and weld, sandblast and paint, though not necessarily cheaply. I've operated tugs so dilapidated that when I wanted to shower, I did it under the pin hole leaks in the engine room. But they were making thousands of dollars a day for their owners, and supplying me with a decent income. When it came time to change an engine on a steely, we cut a hole in the side and pulled out the old one put in the new, welded up the hole and voila; repowered.
As to my comment on insurance, I seriously doubt any yard would haul that or any other "hard case" vessel w/o some kind of insurance in case the owner abandoned the vessel there.
There are abandoned houses all over the US right now, and many thousands of abandoned Americans who are in need of somewhere to live, so I guess a few abandoned boats should not be such a surprise.
But you folks who so offended by them should probably move into those uppity marinas that don't even allow you to dry a bathing suit or towel on your lifelines.
__________________
capta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2012, 01:46   #94
Registered User
 
callmecrazy's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2010
Boat: Tartan 30
Posts: 1,548
Images: 1
Re: Derelict Boats - Not Florida

Quote:
Originally Posted by capta View Post
It's so sad the way things have gone.
When an apparently abandoned boat with nice lines is nothing more than an eyesore to those who own the ugliest, cookie cutter, characterless boats, I feel so disheartened.
I saw the launching of the very first production fiberglass sailboats in Sausalito in the early 60's, while working and sailing on vessels such boats as Wanderer, Yankee (SF woody, not Irving Johnson's), Baruna, schooner Atlantic, Wander Bird and Viveka. I hated the smell, the Formica look and feel of the interiors and complete lack of character of those boats, even though they were designed and built by real craftsmen with care and attention to detail.
Well 50+ years later I'm sailing a plastic boat and though she does not have the graceful lines of many of my previous boats, she is low maintenance, fast as hell for a heavy displacement boat and strong enough to take a strike from a container in a gale in the North Atlantic, without damage. And I am sailing her a whole lot more than I would be a beautiful old classic, steel or otherwise.
I don't want that steely, but I grieve for her and what she could be, or at least should be; a loved, comfortable, safe vessel making her way into an exotic anchorage.
I got the impression that Don only gives a damn because he cannot be anchored (moored) where she is.
And not to beat a dead horse, steelies are very easy to repair; cut and weld, sandblast and paint, though not necessarily cheaply. I've operated tugs so dilapidated that when I wanted to shower, I did it under the pin hole leaks in the engine room. But they were making thousands of dollars a day for their owners, and supplying me with a decent income. When it came time to change an engine on a steely, we cut a hole in the side and pulled out the old one put in the new, welded up the hole and voila; repowered.
As to my comment on insurance, I seriously doubt any yard would haul that or any other "hard case" vessel w/o some kind of insurance in case the owner abandoned the vessel there.
There are abandoned houses all over the US right now, and many thousands of abandoned Americans who are in need of somewhere to live, so I guess a few abandoned boats should not be such a surprise.
But you folks who so offended by them should probably move into those uppity marinas that don't even allow you to dry a bathing suit or towel on your lifelines.
While I agree wholeheartedly with your sentiment. I can't help but point out that the first fiberglass boats were not produced in the 60's in Cali....

Good Old Boat - The Birth of Fiberglass Boats article

Also, there are currently more empty houses in the US than there are homeless people.... "house" that for irony.

https://www.google.com/search?q=more...hrome&ie=UTF-8
__________________
My Blog
callmecrazy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2012, 02:33   #95
Armchair Bucketeer
 
David_Old_Jersey's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 10,013
Images: 4
Re: Derelict Boats - Not Florida

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cormorant View Post
Now, some might call her a derelict, but I plan to restore her with a thorough wire brushing, followed by two coats of Rustoleum. . . .
Two coats?

How the other half live

David_Old_Jersey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2012, 03:54   #96
Registered User
 
Celestialsailor's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: In Mexico, working on the boat
Boat: Hallberg Rassy 35. and 14ft.Whitehall pulling skiff.
Posts: 8,013
Images: 5
Re: Derelict Boats - Not Florida

Quote:
Originally Posted by capta View Post
But you folks who so offended by them should probably move into those uppity marinas that don't even allow you to dry a bathing suit or towel on your lifelines.
...Yes and at the same time these offended folks talk of freedom and the call to go voyaging while all the time caving into ridiculous rules imposed upon them in the name of doing the right thing for our society.
__________________
"Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well-preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming: Wow - what a ride!"

http://wwwjolielle.blogspot.com/
Celestialsailor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2012, 04:37   #97
Don't ask if you can't handle it
 
sailorboy1's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: On the boat somewhere
Boat: Hunter 410
Posts: 12,320
Re: Derelict Boats - Not Florida

Quote:
Originally Posted by capta View Post
I got the impression that Don only gives a damn because he cannot be anchored (moored) where she is.
.

And there I thought for a minute you would have a non personal dig post.
__________________
jobless, houseless, clueless, living on a boat and cruising around somewhere
sailorboy1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2012, 05:11   #98
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Alaska
Boat: Truant Triad 37 Cutter
Posts: 346
Re: Derelict Boats - Not Florida

Do her halyards slap too?
__________________
seahag is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2012, 16:32   #99
Senior Cruiser
 
Cheechako's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Skagit City, WA
Posts: 19,369
Re: Derelict Boats - Not Florida

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kettlewell View Post
Some go through life seeing the glass half empty, while others see the glass half full.
yeah, well.... I've seen far too many boats as "half full" that looked way better than that one! ......and regretted taking on the project. Can you imagine what the inside looks like!!
__________________

__________________
"I spent most of my money on Booze, Broads and Boats. The rest I wasted" - Elmore Leonard











Cheechako is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
florida

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 09:11.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.