Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 19-01-2013, 04:15   #1
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 5
Cutter Rig

What are the advantages of a cutter rig and does this configuration improve a boat's pointing ability?
__________________

__________________
BillinKL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-01-2013, 04:41   #2
Moderator
 
Dockhead's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Cowes (Winter), Baltic (Summer) (the boat!); somewhere in the air (me!)
Boat: Cutter-Rigged Moody 54
Posts: 19,750
Re: Cutter Rig

Search the archives. It does not improve pointing ability. It adds flexibility to the sail plan and adds sail area while reaching. It is no better than and possibly worse than a sloop for sailing hard on the wi d, and running.
__________________

__________________
Dockhead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-01-2013, 05:39   #3
Registered User
 
Delancey's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Miami, FL
Boat: sunk by irma
Posts: 3,462
Re: Cutter Rig

Cutter rigs also have the ability to maintain the center of effort of the sail plan fore and aft when shortening sail in heavy weather when compared to a sloop by flying a staysail on their inner forestay. Flying a storm jib on a sloop has the relative effect of moving the center of effort of the sail plan forward. Additionally, splitting the fore triangle means the sails are smaller than on a sloop and therefore easier to handle. An issue of less relevance post roller furling. Typically a cutter rig's mast will be stepped slightly aft when compared to a sloop rig on the same hull.
__________________
Delancey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-01-2013, 06:33   #4
Registered User
 
transmitterdan's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2011
Boat: Valiant 42
Posts: 4,025
The traditional definition of a cutter is when the mast is aft of station 4. It is not only a matter of whether there are multiple fore sails. Many (if not most) double head sail sloops are not cutters because the mast is further forward.

My cutter has better sail balance over much greater ranges of wind conditions. I don't think it has better pointing ability per se. But it is much easier to carry the right sail in different wind conditions. For this reason they are well liked by their cruising owners.

Best regards,
Dan
__________________
transmitterdan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-01-2013, 06:37   #5
Registered User
 
Alecadi's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Marathon FL
Boat: Endeavour 35, 1984,
Posts: 937
Quote:
Originally Posted by transmitterdan View Post
The traditional definition of a cutter is when the mast is aft of station 4. It is not only a matter of whether there are multiple fore sails. Many (if not most) double head sail sloops are not cutters because the mast is further forward.

My cutter has better sail balance over much greater ranges of wind conditions. I don't think it has better pointing ability per se. But it is much easier to carry the right sail in different wind conditions. For this reason they are well liked by their cruising owners.

Best regards,
Dan
What is "station 4"?
Thank you
Alec
__________________
People spend time putting little boats in bottles, me I put bottles in my little boat...
Alecadi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-01-2013, 06:46   #6
Registered User
 
transmitterdan's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2011
Boat: Valiant 42
Posts: 4,025
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alecadi View Post

What is "station 4"?
Thank you
Alec
Any hull can be divided up into 10 nominally equal sections (stations) numbered fore to aft 1-10. So station 4 will begin approximately 30% back from the stem head. Designers use this system so they can talk or design without specifying the exact length of the hull. Mostly they talk...

Regards,
Dan
__________________
transmitterdan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-01-2013, 07:12   #7
Registered User
 
cburger's Avatar

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Nyack, NY
Boat: Westsail 32
Posts: 1,547
Images: 1
Re: Cutter Rig

I am doing this from memory which ain't so gtreat lately, so go easy on me this morning guy's and gals. The English are credited with developing the cutter rig sometime in the mid to late 1800's, in an effort to gain more speed out of navel vessels of the time. Often referred to as revenue cutters they were used to chase down smugglers and enforce the rules of the day. The cutter was considered to be the state of the art for its time. A true cutter is equiped with a bowsprit allowing the vessel to carry more sail for its given length, with the mast stepped farther foward than a sloop of equal length, to balance the sail being carried tacked to the end of the sprit. The speed of the cutter has to do with the spaces between the sails or slots the idea being that the air flow is accellerated as it is drives through these spaces. As a positive the cutter allows a multitude of smaller, managable sail configurations. As a disadvantage you have more lines to manage, yankee sheets, statsail sheets, mainsheets and running backstays.
__________________
"All men are created equal, some are just more equal than others"
cburger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-01-2013, 08:10   #8
Registered User
 
Alecadi's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Marathon FL
Boat: Endeavour 35, 1984,
Posts: 937
Quote:
Originally Posted by transmitterdan View Post

Any hull can be divided up into 10 nominally equal sections (stations) numbered fore to aft 1-10. So station 4 will begin approximately 30% back from the stem head. Designers use this system so they can talk or design without specifying the exact length of the hull. Mostly they talk...

Regards,
Dan
Thank you
Alec
__________________
People spend time putting little boats in bottles, me I put bottles in my little boat...
Alecadi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-01-2013, 08:18   #9
Registered User
 
sww914's Avatar

Join Date: May 2009
Location: Punta De Mita
Boat: Vagabond 39 Hull # 1
Posts: 1,842
Re: Cutter Rig

Probably not better for racing or else racers would be using them, but good for cruising. I'd say about 1/2 of monohull cruisers have either a cutter or a ketch. Many of the other mono cruisers have production boats like Hunters, Beneteaus, and Catalinas which are mainly sloops.
Most of the cats and tris are sloops but most of the huge (super expensive) cats have 2-3 or even 4 headsails on roller furlers set really close together but I can't remember the name of that style of rig.
__________________
Steve
http://www.landfallvoyages.com
sww914 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-01-2013, 08:50   #10
Registered User
 
endoftheroad's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Key West
Boat: Westsail 32 and Herreshoff 28
Posts: 1,159
Re: Cutter Rig

What's The Ideal Sailing Rig?

Sorry if the above read isn't specific to your question but I got something out of this when I first read it a couple years ago.
__________________
endoftheroad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-01-2013, 09:39   #11
Registered User
 
cburger's Avatar

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Nyack, NY
Boat: Westsail 32
Posts: 1,547
Images: 1
Re: Cutter Rig

If any of the members are intersted November 2012 isue of Good Old Boat has an article titled "What is a Cutter".
__________________
"All men are created equal, some are just more equal than others"
cburger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-01-2013, 09:47   #12
Registered User
 
Tradewind 35's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: On the river Fowey, Cornwall, UK
Boat: Tradwind 35
Posts: 21
Images: 4
Re: Cutter Rig

Cutter rig makes the sails more manageable - smaller sails are easier to handle in heavy weather or when short handed. You can also mix and match to get the right balance for the conditions. For example I have a roller yankee up forard and a hanked on staysail. A part furled roller does not give a good sail shape so going to windward I can reef the main, roll away a bit of yankee but keep the staysail up. Cutter rig also allows me to hank on the storm jib in place of the staysail and then just progressively roll away the yankee as the wind picks up.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	a1150.jpg
Views:	185
Size:	417.9 KB
ID:	53112   Click image for larger version

Name:	Force6a.jpg
Views:	168
Size:	412.0 KB
ID:	53121  

Click image for larger version

Name:	dec26.jpg
Views:	175
Size:	337.9 KB
ID:	53122  
__________________
Robin
Pleiades of Birdham
MXWQ5
Tradewind 35 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-01-2013, 14:21   #13
Moderator
 
Adelie's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: La Ciudad de la Misión Didacus de Alcalá en Alta California, Virreinato de Nueva España
Boat: Cal 20
Posts: 4,628
Re: Cutter Rig

Quote:
Originally Posted by sww914 View Post
.
Most of the cats and tris are sloops but most of the huge (super expensive) cats have 2-3 or even 4 headsails on roller furlers set really close together but I can't remember the name of that style of rig.
I believe you named that rig in parentheses near the beginning of the sentence.
__________________
A house is but a boat so poorly built and so firmly run aground no one would think to try and refloat it.
SailboatData
Adelie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-01-2013, 18:05   #14
Senior Cruiser
 
SkiprJohn's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Kea'au, Big Island, Hawaii
Boat: Cascade, Sloop, 42 - "Casual"
Posts: 14,192
Re: Cutter Rig

Modern cutters have their mast set further aft than sloops which contradicts what was mentioned earlier in one explanation. That leaves room for more headsails forward of the mast whether or not a bowsprit is used.
kind regards,
__________________
John
SkiprJohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-01-2013, 19:00   #15
Registered User
 
Capt Phil's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Stateline NV
Boat: Prior boats: Transpac 49; DeFever 54
Posts: 2,749
Re: Cutter Rig

The big advantage I recall in the the two cutter rigs I cruised was sailing shorthanded or singlehanding with the smaller foretriangle sails and giving up very little in sailing efficiency. One was a ketch rigged cutter the other a sloop rigged cutter... many memorable weeks and months aboard both vessels. Lived aboard the ketch for over 5 years. Phil
__________________

__________________
Capt Phil is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 23:21.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.