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Old 19-01-2011, 12:28   #871
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There are after all tourists and cruisers and expats who report that rent and medical care are cheap, food is fresh, household help easy to come buy...If paradise got good PR, they'd have to put up gates to keep the throngs of gringos out, right?
Right!

How am I supposed to cruise on 500 a month if all the really cheap places are supposed to be avoided?
As far as high situational awareness. Has anyone in Washington looked at that cities murder rate?
I have talked with a few people that have been to South and Central America and they all say the same thing. You have to watch for where you go a wrong turn can get you into trouble. You know! Like LA, Chicago, or New York...How does the State Dept feel about those cities? Jeeez Louise ! But they also say the people are great and friendly. They want to be friends and they want to help you anyway they can.
I don't care what the US says I'm still making a stop there on my circumnavigation. Gotta get provisions you know.
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Old 19-01-2011, 14:23   #872
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Not some much a country or city to avoid, but where in each of those to avoid. But the State Department isn't going to list which ports and which city blocks to avoid. Been to Washington DC lots of things and NEVER felt in any danger. But I bet I could have found some if I tried.
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Old 20-01-2011, 12:00   #873
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The Third World, Everlast Welding Machines etc:

We are back at UVI now....

Regarding my cracked regulator, it was the Argon Gas Regulator supplied with
the welding machine. Apparently, the housing was milled too thin and the pressure generated by the nipple on the High Pressure Gauge caused same to split radially. I think the housing was split invisibly when supplied, because I used enormous amounts of argon while welding on the ship.

Once I get some funds from the pension again, I'll return the machine and
all its peripherals for Refurbishment and Repair.

Regarding Colombia. I cruised there, did Venezuela too. The coast has always been problematic. It is my understanding that things are better now. Cruising World had several features regarding such.

Kit Kapp cruised the Spanish Main extensively during the 70's and 80's, created special charts of lots of the anchorages, of which I have one. He made no bones about only surviving because he defended himself and his ship with a gun on at least one occasion.

Regarding firearms aboard... I don't carry them... But I am very alert to
the situation I'm entering or in. so if things don't seem right, I leave. If you choose to carry firearms, a few suggestions from a war veteran..

a) Practice using each weapon until it is part of you, and you can put a bullet where you want, when you want.

b) Don't pull the weapon unless you are going to use it.

c) Once you pull the weapon, commence firing within a split second

d) Hit whatever or whomever you are shooting at

e) Sort out things after you are in control of the situation and the opposition is toast.

That said, one certain way to avoid problems is to learn to say hello, how are you in the local language, and to ask permission to anchor etc.

Much of the previous pages regarding security, cruisers killing local economies etc is rubbish. Cruisers on micro-budgets do not destroy local economies, if anything, they offer employment opportunities to locals through their purchase of goods and services. They most certainly change the local economy much less than the backpackers do.

I think that far too much of this thread is being spent jaw boning about
political matters, and far too little is being spent on the matters of outfitting and provisioning for cruising.

We have armchair sailors who are not taking advantage of the current economic crisis to buy good boats cheap. Nor are they looking at the obvious places to buy same, such as Trinidad, Florida and the Carolinas.

I just saw a Cheoy Lee 42, built in 1970. Gorgeous boat! Some are available for ~ $35k. Others far more. A bit pricey for this thread.

If you cruise the Caribbean regularly, I suggest that you stop by the Customs office downtown Charlotte Amalie and signup for the Local Boater Option program. It makes returning to the USVI painless. You don't have to go to the customshouse. Simply call from a local phone on arrival.

If you are on a budget, plan on buying your tea and powdered milk at the large supermarket in St. Martin, and the rest in Martinique. Apparently, the DR no longer makes food in tins, instead they are imported. I'd really like confirmation on that.

Food in Colombia and Venezuela can be a bargain, depending... The fuel certainly is.

If cruising Venezuela, leave the Testigos suddenly, and without notice, at dusk. Travel north west to get north of the rhumbline between the testigos and Margarita, and approach Margarita from the north. Travel without lights and be sure to do your westing at least 30 miles from the coast. Once you leave Margarita for the Rocques head north west to get 30 miles off the coast, do your westing and approach the Rocques from the north. Again leave Margarita suddenly, and without warning and at dusk. Travel with other boats if you can. Don't use the VHF to organize your departure, visit the other boats personally instead.

Again, I remind one and all that micro-budget crusing is only possible on boats between 28-32 Ft LOA, with displacements less than 8 tons.

And, on boats without an engine. An engine increases costs dramatically.

Regarding Solar Panels, Wind turbines, etc....

We finally got the renewable energy systems installed. They make a very big difference. We now only use the engine for propulsion. We now use very little fuel. The solar panel array and the wind turbine run the fridge/freezer, the computers, the autopilot, the instruments, the lights, etc.

When outfitting your boat, it is now practical to dispense with oil lamps altogether, instead using LEDs for all lighting, including anchor lighting. On boats less than 12 meters, the sidelights need only be visible 1 mile, and a candle is vsible at a mile. the anchor light ditto. This means that a solar powered garden light available at Home Depot can legally be used as your anchor light, and.... such a light comes with a photo diode that turns it on at dusk and off at dawn, and they are cheap.

Should you equip the boat with 60 watt panels mounted on the hatches, and possibly a larger panel aft, you can run all your lights, and the fridge. If you add a 400 watt marine wind turbine, you most certainly will be able to add a laptop too.

Regardless, you must have a boat that sails well, and sails to drive it. You don't need roller furling, you don't need RADAR, you don't need a chart plotter, but you do need to know how to make your boat sail where and when you want to.

INDY
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Old 20-01-2011, 12:09   #874
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Dinghies

A micro-budget cruiser must have a hard dinghy that rows and sails well.

He may, or may not have funds to support an outboard. Lack of an outboard
should not be an impediment. Neither the Hiscocks, Roths, or Pardeys or myself had outboards. But we all have hard dinks that are easy to row or that sail well.

Using stitch and glue construction, anyone handy can build Chameleon in a few weekends. If you are serious about going cruising, you should start your
outfitting by building one. Plans are available from Danny Green for $25.
The dink comes apart into two nesting pieces, each easily handled by a woman. Next, carve out a set of Peter Culler oars for the dink, a mast, rudder, boom, and sew a bed sheet into a sail.

Go off and get some sailing in.

INDY
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Old 20-01-2011, 14:50   #875
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Thanks Indy you are getting us back on track.
I'm going to look at a 30ft Columbia this weekend that is very cheap and 10,500 displacement. The owner told me it needs to be cleaned and worked on but what sailboat doesn't. It comes with three sails and a blown motor but I don't want or need a motor anyway. It'll be good to watch the cruisers at the dock every time I come back from a sail.
How can I get the trans to make electric when I'm sailing if the prop turns underway? Has anyone done that?
I will also refurbish everything on deck rebed all the chain plates,windows, and hardware. Add a manual windlass and Bow anchor with 300 ft of chain.
I want to look closely at the rigging and find a place to get cable and shackles if needed but over sized for my boat. Also this will give me extra parts down below if I ever need them.
The interior I have to admit will probably be torn out if not needed. I am alone and will only have bedding for 2 people at the most. I want a starboard side full of storage and spaces for little things to stash away with a nice settee on the port side.
The electrical system will need to be inspected and reworked if necessary. But I will cross that bridge when I add solar panels and wind generation as well as more batteries in the space where the motor was.
Also here in florida Big lots sells solar powered led lights for twenty bucks each. They are shaped like old lanterns from the 1800's and if they can be lit all night they would make great anchor lights or even a bright running light hung from the mast at sea. And like I said they recharge with solar so batteries are not needed as often. I just don't know how long they last but two or three in the cabin alone is worth the price.
Two Propane tanks for cooking and more water and other tankage will be needed. Extra pumps,and parts fro everything from the keel bolts which I will change out also to bulbe for the light atop the mast which will be change out also before leaving.
Haul the boat epoxy, paint and ablative coat the bottom right before leaving.
One thing we haven't mentioned was safety equipment and grab bags for if the boat gets holed and sinks. Any ideas on what to have?
Im thinking a hard dingy with extra flotation and a sail and rudder. A set of flares, clothing,water and food for a month,fishing line and lures,a knife, a compass, a world map or maps,a hand held GPS and VHF radio. Anything else you can think of?
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Old 20-01-2011, 14:52   #876
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You can attach a belt driven alternator directly to the prop shaft.
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Old 20-01-2011, 14:57   #877
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You can attach a belt driven alternator directly to the prop shaft.
Thanks !
That's what I was thinking with a little ingenuity and a lot of welding. I don't expect to make heaps of power but a few volts and amps would be great on a long haul.
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Old 20-01-2011, 14:57   #878
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one i made earlier,need minimum of 1000rpm on alternator spindle. ideally 40 cm dia pully on shaft,this one is 30 and alternator 5 cm but massive proppellor
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Old 20-01-2011, 15:10   #879
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Do they make a propeller big enough or will I have to fabricate one?
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Old 20-01-2011, 15:17   #880
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that was a 28" prop on a 52 ft yacht ,80 amp 24 volt alternator ,get the pully size correct,about 40 cm and it will chuck out power after about 4 knots, alternator shaft speed is more important than prop size.
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Old 20-01-2011, 15:24   #881
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that was a 28" prop on a 52 ft yacht ,80 amp 24 volt alternator ,get the pully size correct,about 40 cm and it will chuck out power after about 4 knots, alternator shaft speed is more important than prop size.
shaft speed will be a factor of boat speed, and a larger prop will slow the boat down. Spinning shaft + large pulley + easy to turn alternator with high output

You can learn a lot about this type of thing by research DIY wind generators. A lot of people make their own (not for marine environment) wind gens and they need the right alternator to make it spin better in light winds... I don't have any links on hand but its out there.
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Old 20-01-2011, 15:45   #882
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that was a 28" prop on a 52 ft yacht ,80 amp 24 volt alternator ,get the pully size correct,about 40 cm and it will chuck out power after about 4 knots, alternator shaft speed is more important than prop size.

Larger shaft pulley means more alternator revolutions. Medium prop means less resistance and more knots.
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Old 20-01-2011, 15:57   #883
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the pully you want as large as possable to give that all important 1000 rpm,as an alternator wont start charging till it gets to that rpm.

propellor pitch is what governs the speed, size only governs the amount of power it can transfere.

but my guess is it would be best to go with the prop allready in there,unless it is of the feathering type,which in this case wont work.

generally expect to lose about 1/2 knot of speed what ever fixed type of prop you use.
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Old 21-01-2011, 08:01   #884
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PJSSAILOR

I think I am one of those very lucky ones. I was very young when I learned how to work and both have fun at it and make a few bucks. Finally I even learned how to make money mosty easily. And most of a century ago my great grandma thought me that any woman with a brain knew it was a lot more fun to make on a full stomach than an empty one. And of course I discovered that true for me too. So my guess is that you too will discover that if those great looking women have a brain, they will tire of your budget. I have always found it a lot less work to make a few extra bucks the to cut it out of expenses. I'll you are lucky, I would be surprised if you don't also.

Lots of luck.

Oh about pretty women, I sure like looking at them too, but I always shut my eyes when I would think I would want them open. Darn.
Cheers
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Old 21-01-2011, 08:08   #885
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I think I am one of those very lucky ones. I was very young when I learned how to work and both have fun at it and make a few bucks. Finally I even learned how to make money mosty easily. And most of a century ago my great grandma thought me that any woman with a brain knew it was a lot more fun to make on a full stomach than an empty one. And of course I discovered that true for me too. So my guess is that you too will discover that if those great looking women have a brain, they will tire of your budget. I have always found it a lot less work to make a few extra bucks the to cut it out of expenses. I'll you are lucky, I would be surprised if you don't also.

Lots of luck.

Oh about pretty women, I sure like looking at them too, but I always shut my eyes when I would think I would want them open. Darn.
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Yes, of course... big boats, shiny nice cars, fancy restaurants, thats how to get the smart women!
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