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Old 29-08-2010, 15:14   #1
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Crash Blankets and Hull Damage

Just got done reading an article in 48* North about MacGyvering at sea.

In it there was talk of being prepared for just about any eventuality by caring odd bits of this or that which in turn can be used to Jerry rig some fashion of repair to get you by until a permanent fix is available.

Personally I have no questions or at least very, very few of my ability to do such things, some of you would probably shake your head at the amount of bits of stuff I pack on-board "just in-case" for our, so far inland sailing experience only...Katie bar the doors once we head off shore

All of this with one caveat....and that is for those things that go bump in the night compromising the hull directly not through hull or any of that lot... requiring quick action to not only locate the damaged area and source of water intrusion but effectively stopping such intrusion.

I know there is such a thing as a crash blanket and that also a spare sail will work as well...my question is How well do these work and does any one have first hand or second hand knowledge of there usage and how successful it was.

I have no experience with Marine-Tex either and was thinking of buying some for some underwater experimentation.. Not much concerns me regarding the ins and out of survival afloat....staying afloat concerns me a little....

Ya! Ya! buy a multi hull I can here it already...give it a rest or ill chain saw your hulls in half and prove you wrong..

All suggestions other then that one are welcome.
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Old 29-08-2010, 22:07   #2
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expanding foam under a braced piece of board?
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Old 29-08-2010, 22:19   #3
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Crash blankets, otherwise known as collision mats. My search here brought up a lot of threads, but not the one I was looking for. I'm not a patient searcher.
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Old 29-08-2010, 23:38   #4
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Ya! Ya! buy a multi hull I can here it already...give it a rest or ill chain saw your hulls in half and prove you wrong..

All suggestions other then that one are welcome.

 you can quarter most multihulls and they will still float!
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Old 30-08-2010, 01:13   #5
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Cheap Insurance

We carry a fully rigged crash blanket we made from an old sail. The principle seems to make sense. That said, successfully deploying one at night in moderate conditions seems like it could be a challenge.

If the collision is low and aft on the hull the keel may interfere with the positioning of the blanket. That said it seems like it should work most of the time if holed ahead of the keel.

A crash blanket is inexpensive, low volume and light weight and therefore low burden insurance. I think it should be one of the arrows in the quiver.
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Old 30-08-2010, 05:02   #6
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I once saw a French yacht that had sailed about 400 miles with a crash collision mat in-situ covering a hole about 5 inches across. They didn't have anything to repair the hole so just had to make port as best they could. Ever since I witnessed that I've had one in my stores but with lots of underwater epoxy, timber and a really big pan that I'd brace in place and then epoxy.

P.
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Old 30-08-2010, 07:17   #7
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Interesting that you would bring the subject up. On my last trip I encountered a deadhead the size of a telephone pole. It was bobbing vertically, varying from submerged to a couple feet exposed. I keep a close watch for that stuff but if I had missed seeing that one it might have ruined my day.

Todd
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Old 30-08-2010, 07:22   #8
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Good info so far...Love Fishwifes eye whitness story thats comforting to know!

yep! Idora thats exactly what Im talking about.
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Old 30-08-2010, 07:40   #9
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Blue poly tarps, and a LOT of plastic shopping bags, duct tape, odd sized pieces of wood (including cones and wedges), ratchet straps, zip ties, a small hydraulic jack, some neoprene sheet, a hundred feet of 1/4" polypro line, and mask, snorkel, fins and wetsuit if in cold water.
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Old 30-08-2010, 07:47   #10
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Blue poly tarps, and a LOT of plastic shopping bags, duct tape, odd sized pieces of wood (including cones and wedges), ratchet straps, zip ties, a small hydraulic jack, some neoprene sheet, a hundred feet of 1/4" polypro line, and mask, snorkel, fins and wetsuit if in cold water.
Sounds like theres a story in there somewhere.....Come on cough it up..
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Old 30-08-2010, 08:30   #11
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Blue poly tarps, and a LOT of plastic shopping bags, duct tape, odd sized pieces of wood (including cones and wedges), ratchet straps, zip ties, a small hydraulic jack, some neoprene sheet, a hundred feet of 1/4" polypro line, and mask, snorkel, fins and wetsuit if in cold water.
Good advice. From my damage control training in the navy the first priority is to stem the water flow from inside the vessel to a point that the pumps can control the leak. Once that is achieved an external fix can be carried out if warranted. External fixes are normally carried out on larger hull damages which cannot be contained by splinter boxes. Methods of stemming the flows can be achieved by using softwood wedges which come in a variety of shapes and sizes. For larger holes use a mattress or cushion braced (held in place) in position by wooden shoring. A handy item would be to have a fibreglass splinter box (military name) which is used after restricting the flow with wedges. The box is held in place with wooden shoring. Carry some neoprene/rubber sheets to seal the edges of the splinter boxes if you have curved hulls. The splinter boxes normally come with neoprene/rubber around the edges to achieve a seal on relatively flat surfaces. You could quite easily build these yourself. If you cannot be bothered with wooden shoring which needs to be cut to length to suit the situation you could lash out and buy telescopic shoring which would be a lot quicker to erect. Did a google search on damage control equipment and could not find the splinter boxes but did find a kit that has the wedges etc. Obviously the items in the kits are for larger vessels with exposed pipes etc but it gives you an idea of what a good damage control kit might contain.

SeaKits Damage Control Kit - Fourwinds Enterprises
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Old 30-08-2010, 09:43   #12
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Anyone who's been in the Navy went through damage control training, including putting you in the "dc trainer" where they start flooding the compartment and you have to use everything at your disposal to keep afloat. The real stories of guys who've made it work like on the USS Cole did exactly that: everything at their disposal. There's nothing you can buy in advance that will exactly fit a big hole or cracked hull, so you need enough materials to fabricate quickly and know how to use your hands (quickly).

There's a small locker where we keep all the DC gear; it doesn't seem a common way to do it on a yacht but it's a hold over for me from the Navy.

- bung plugs
- thru hull plugs
- hose clamps
- low clearance hack saw
- low clearance wrecking bar
- deadblow ballet
- collision mat
- two part underwater putty-epoxy
- zip ties
- various zip lock bag sized
- headlamp
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Old 30-08-2010, 12:10   #13
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Quote:
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Sounds like theres a story in there somewhere.....Come on cough it up..
Not one story I'm afraid... but a compilation of stories from 30 years of moving floating things around that inherently want to sink! I actually carry all that stuff in a big orange Pelican Box bungee corded to the deck whenever making a blue water passage (or not so blue water delivery on an unfamiliar vessel)

That same box has fresh water, inflatable vests, sunblock, mirror, compass, flares, sea dye, Knife, flashlights, a SPOT locater, waterproof VHF handheld, copies of passports/licenses/ID, First aid kit, and probably some other crap I'm forgetting. Everyone onboard is required to be familiar with the "OH S**T BOX".

The idea is to bungee it down in a central location... tight enough not to go over, but not enough to overcome the buoyancy of the box if the boat goes down.

I've been into it many times just for convenience, twice for emergencies, and once I got to watch it bob to the surface while I was swimming for the dink.
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Old 30-08-2010, 17:49   #14
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- deadblow ballet

I gotta get me one of those, whatever it is.

deadblow- something to do with bad breath?
ballet? Something to do while wearing a tutu?
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Old 30-08-2010, 18:09   #15
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Base on my personal experience with crack fiberglass hull. It was 19feet fishing boat. As long as the boat was moving, the water got suck up from hull. In the case of sailboat. When you discover a crack, crank the engine and go for a beach.
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